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18 Years of Data Links Neonics to Bee Decline


#1

18 Years of Data Links Neonics to Bee Decline

Nadia Prupis, staff writer

New evidence shows that the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonics, could be linked to bee population decline.

A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, looks at wild bee populations relative to the use of neonics on the oilseed rape plant in England over 18 years. The researchers found that population extinction rates went up along with the pesticide use on the plants, which are widespread throughout the country.


#2

When the bees go, we go!; besides, Soylent Green will get old, and nasty quick.


#3

In the year 2525, if man is still alive,
He'll sow plant A & plant B side to side,
And maybe learn again how to thrive...


#4

Clearly, we need to encourage hardware stores/gardening stores to STOP selling
pesticides with neonics --

but, why aren't they mentioning what companies are making and selling pesticides
that kill bees because they use neonics?


#5

They are going to kick this ball around and kick this ball around until there's not one pollinator left on the planet.

Now for some action by those that KNOW that neonics, pesticides and herbicides are doing damage and have been for longer than this study has been going on.

And yes, we have been keeping bees since the 70's and seeing things go steadily to pot despite Goddess knows how much evidence. It's gonna be pretty tough to eat all that money that Bayer, Monsanto and their ilk are stashing away.


#6

Thanks for highlighting this important article. However your photo is of a hoverfly (bee mimic) and not an actual bee.


#7

That song was way too optimistic about the time-frame for time collapse of human civilization! The destruction of the ecosphere was rapidly accelerating at the time it was written, and the thousands of years have been telescoped into a few decades.

Now - less than 50 years after 2525 was a number one hit - we're already at the brink of the "10,000 years" referred to in the song, when "man's [sic] reign is through"...


#8

That's a tough call because neonics now seem to appear everywhere. It is extremely difficult to find sources of seeds that explicitly state that they are not pre-treated. Most commercial seed sold to professional greenhouses commonly is treated with fungicides and neonics, therefore, many of the the plants folks purchase may be contaminated. Unless there is some specific label guaranteeing that the source seed is either organic or chemical free, the only safe assumption to make is that it is not neonic safe.
Remember, neonics are taken up into the plants systemically, eventually including the flowers, pollen, and seeds produced by the plant. Neonics maintain what is termed 'persistence', meaning the compound remains active for a long time, at least months and in some cases years.


#9

The use of the term wild bees is not very accurate. Are we talking feral honeybees (Apis mellifera)? or the many species of bees (hymenoptera) that are pollinators but not nearly as colonial as honeybees? Also, I think the graphic used here is of a bee fly (fly family; diptera) not a hymenopteran bee (maybe someone else can respond to this assertion). Writers need to be a little bit more careful when communicating such important information.


#10

Neonics are affecting all varieties and species of bees.
As for the image, though the angle makes it difficult to really identify, one might guess it to be Bombus perplexus, the common Eastern Bumble---and yes, they too, are under threat.


#11

And yet, and yet...some of the major retailers say they'll stop selling products containing neonics in 2018 or 2019, or whenever.

Such commitment.


#12

P.S. After all, bees merely pollinate most of our fruits and vegetables.

No big deal.

First and utmost consideration, as always, is given to manufacturers and corporations.


#13

I see that you have now changed the photo. Thanks.


#15

BAYER and SYNGENTA make neonics

Syngenta and Bayer, neonics are the most widely used insecticides both in the ...

Million people urge Bayer to stop bee-killer...
phys.org/news/2016-04-million-people-urge-bayer-bee-killer.h...
Apr 29, 2016 ... German agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer was ... one million signatures urging it to stop manufacturing pesticides that ... "Bee killing is not really something that a company that is looking ... The studies also indicate the neonicotinoids can lower the bees' fertility and their resistance to disease.

Marketed by European chemical giants Syngenta and Bayer, neonics are the most widely used insecticides both in the United States and globally. In 2009, the agency commenced a long, slow process of reassessing them—not as a class, but rather one by one (there are five altogether). Meanwhile, tens of millions of acres of farmland are treated with neonics each year, and the health of US honeybee hives continues to be dismal.

BAYER has been fighting this effort to save bees at the cost of losing profits from their product --

Bayer is suing Europe for saving the bees -...
action.sumofus.org/a/bayer-bees-lawsuit/

Bayer revises position to propose extra...
www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jan/12/bayer-re...
Jan 12, 2016 ... Related: Neonicotinoids: new warning on pesticide harm to bees. The agency determined ... A spokesman said Bayer will look to work with the EPA to reduce risks to bees. “EPA concluded ... Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. ..... Kill it all as fast as possible is your agenda.

They're not mentioning the companies because they're protecting them -- it's a clear call -- not a "tough call."


#17

Jazzbo

You seem oddly upset -- rather than pleased -- that I provided the names of
the TWO LARGEST MANUFACTURERS of neonics where most of the production
could be stopped . . .

All while work would continue to STOP any other company insane enough to
produce neonics.

The production of this poison must be stopped at the source --

_BAYER and SYNGENTA make neonics _

_Syngenta and Bayer, neonics are the most widely used insecticides both in the ... _

**Million people urge Bayer to stop bee-killer...**
_ phys.org/news/2016-04-million-people-urge-bayer-bee-killer.h... _
_Apr 29, 2016 ... German agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer was ... one million signatures urging it to stop manufacturing pesticides that ... "Bee killing is not really something that a company that is looking ... The studies also indicate the neonicotinoids can lower the bees' fertility and their resistance to disease. _

Marketed by European chemical giants Syngenta and Bayer, neonics are the most widely used insecticides both in the United States and globally. In 2009, the agency commenced a long, slow process of reassessing them—not as a class, but rather one by one (there are five altogether). Meanwhile, tens of millions of acres of farmland are treated with neonics each year, and the health of US honeybee hives continues to be dismal.

_BAYER has been fighting this effort to save bees at the cost of losing profits from their product -- _

Bayer is suing Europe for saving the bees -...
_ action.sumofus.org/a/bayer-bees-lawsuit/ _

Bayer is concerned with saving its profits -- not nature.


#19

Not everyone knows that the largest suppliers are BAYER and SYNGENTA --

but, let's also get these names out to be watched:
The Scotts Company, as well as ArborSystems, Arysta LifeScience, Control Solutions, Inc., Gro Tec, Inc., Gulfstream Home and Garden, Lawn and Garden Products, Inc., Nufarm Americas Inc., OHP, Inc., Rainbow Treecare Scientific Advancements, Valent U.S.A. Corporation, and Voluntary Purchasing Groups, Sumitomo Chemicals, Mitsui Chemicals, Nippon Soda, Sumitomo Chemicals, and let's not omit Dow Agrosciences.

Agree, "PHASING" out these poisons is something to be closely watched by government --
and government should also be running an education program for anyone involved with agriculture
to advise against use of these products.

I'd suggest . . . If you have any other names -- get those out to the public.


#20

At the very least, this is a wakeup call for Canada. Here in my country, authorities would have us believe the main threat to bees is from CORN treated with neonics. Yet vast areas of Canada are sown to CANOLA, a huge oilseed crop here and the same one referenced in this story. Yet few, if any studies are aimed at determining how big a threat treated CANOLA is to pollinators. Here in my home province, Manitoba, most honey is produced from bees who forage on canola. This is a huge issue which needs to be tackled, now. Yet our politicians and regulators remain asleep at the switch, dumb-as-posts to the imminent dangers. www.PlanetInPeril.ca


#21

Green --
Also seems like a huge delay in acting whether Canada or US --
Obviously, they've known what the problem is for some time now.
And, again, corporate control over Congress, elected officials, and
government agencies prevents action against these monstrous corporations.