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50 Years Later, 'Catsonville 9' Burning of Vietnam Draft Notices Continues to Inspire Anti-War Activists


#1

50 Years Later, 'Catsonville 9' Burning of Vietnam Draft Notices Continues to Inspire Anti-War Activists

Jon Queally, staff writer

Fifty years ago today—on May 17, 1968 in the small town of Cantonsville, Maryland—nine Catholic Worker and anti-war activists made history, and inspired a wave of popular resistance, for their stance against the Vietnam War as they used homemade napalm to torch a pile of draft notices they had seized from the local federal office.


#2

In the 1970s I had the occasion to tour Whiteman AFB, including one of the missile launch control modules ??-feet underground where the two AFB personnel sit side by side with their “ignition” keys to be synchronously turned upon command. On the deck, I stood on the apron of a missile silo the doors of which were opened. I gazed into the abyss below at the Minuteman II missile readied for launching upon short notice. I truly have never been the same since, as nuclear war ceased to be an abstraction from the media for me. It was very tangible. It was awful to think how much humanity puts into its potential destruction whilst despoiling its (and all other life’s) home. It is a puzzle I shall never solve. Kudos to those who resisted and continue to resist war. I am not a religious person, but do believe that “blessed are the peacemakers.”


#3

Some things done in Jesus’ name I imagine he’d be quite proud of.