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'A Class of Its Own': Harvey Declared Most Intense Rain Event in US History


#1

'A Class of Its Own': Harvey Declared Most Intense Rain Event in US History

Jake Johnson, staff writer

Having dropped more than 50 inches of rain in an area east of Houston, Hurricane Harvey was officially declared "the most extreme rain event in U.S. history" on Tuesday.


#2

Even a report on Harvey has to include a plug for and video of Bernie. Of all the news to report about the most damaging storm in US history, I don’t see how Bernie Sanders matters right now. CD doesn’t seem as objective as it used to.


#3

Agreed. Also, it’s too bad Bernie had to spew his Trump comment. Unnecessary and divisive in itself.


#4

It is perfectly appropriate, both for Common Dreams and for Bernie Sanders, to recognize that this is precisely why we need to overcome the great divider, and honor everyone’s humanity. The crises and disasters we will face together will continue to accelerate. Addressing the political problem is a key part of the answer.

EDIT: In fact, now is precisely the correct time to hammer away at Trump’s denialism and divisiveness. Trump will be in Houston mouthing phony platitudes. EVERY responsible person, in politics and media, should sharply denounce him, call out his complete wrongheadedness, and look to the course of action that this world so desperately needs.


#5

The storm has been in the same general area for five days now. Not surprised therefore that it broke the record. It is an amazing meteorological event. The predictions were quite accurate about the storm not moving on but the weather models were not able to predict that the Houston area would take the brunt of it. The prediction also was for up to around 40 inches of rain and is seems that has now been exceeded by a good amount. Had most of the rain affected a less populated area, such a storm (Claudette) that hit Texas about 40 years ago and dropped up to 43 inches of the rain, the damage would have been far less.


#6

Sorry to say, but Harvey is likely not to be in a class of its own. It’s very likely that Harvey is the new normal of storms to come and may even be considered a small event as the future unfolds with storms ever bigger and stronger in the US and around the world.


#7

Actually, I wish we had even more congress critters speaking out against the whole tangerine turds administration!


#8

How does one define “most intense rain event?” Harvey produced 50" of rain over a period of 3-4 days. Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979 dropped an estimated 43 inches of rain in 24 hours on Alvin TX, compared to Harvey’s average of 14-17 inches per day. Smethport PA recorded 34.30 inches of rain in 12 hours on 18 Jul 1942 including 28.5" in three hours. At Burnsville WV, an estimated 13.80" of rain fell in one hour on 04 Aug 1943. And finally, on 04 Jul 1956 at Unionville MD, 1.23" of rain fell in one minute. Which is the most intense? Take your pick.


#9

So, acknowledging Claudette was 43" some four decades ago and now this Houston 50" event: can we stop pols and gov’t officials from talking about a ." thousand year event " and stop the damn obfuscation? If I live to be 90 that’ll be about 7-8 of these catastrophes. Can we find someone who can do division and who isn’t a bullshitting denier?
This helping the enemies of the 99s, imo.


#10

A seriously dreadful thought, how much Monsanto, and Dow chemicals, etc. to include oil, gasoline and other poisons are floating around in the water where people, and animals have to wade through, or swim for their lives in in Texas, Louisiana, and elsewhere from all this flooding from Harvey. Perhaps a national, and international discussion on storage, containment, or outright banning of such poisons needs to become a national, and international issue. After all, the above photograph looks like the future of America, and the world.


#11

I spent a year in Port Arthur, Texas on one very long weekend. There’s just not a lot of interesting things about that entire state, really. It’s got to be about the money.


#12

I agree; however, the musicians, singers coming from Texas is mind blowing, Scott Joplin, Janis Joplin ( Port Arthur, Texas), Buddy Holly, and the list is just endless…


#13

Yes, and Gene and Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff, Joe Ely, Buddy, Waylon ( my pick ), the list is very long… I love singing along along with Asleep At The Wheel, etc…:wink: But, music to me is poetry set to a rhythm ( even if it’s the one only in your head ) and so, these folks are universal and American. Texas has great blues, ( Freddy King ) and awesome roots stuff, as well. You ought to see me dance to Tighten Up :grinning:.
.


#14

Gettin’ by on gettin’ by’s my stock in trade…
Livin’ it day to day…

Days are gonna be tough, but Texas will ride it out. There are myriad great people in the Lone Star State. Don’t bash 'em people, especially not now. A genuine Texan would MUCH rather save your ass than shoot it.

Keep Austin Weird!


#15

Aye, and includes Stevie Ray Vaughan, who performed not one, but two prescient Harvey tributes in Texas Flood and The Sky is Crying …


#16

It is very simple. Bernie Sanders is the leader of the opposition, sometimes known as the democratic party, and that is why he is in the article. As the leader, he covers the country and brings a unified message of community. Who did you expect would show up. The dynamic duo in Congress who can barely remember what day it is? How about that bastion of compassion, Hillary Clinton? Yeah right, she is too busy for us little people.


#17

Lovin-It!


#18

Lets us also not forget Selena Quintanilla-Perez ( Selena ). The Queen of Tejano Music!


#19

Hey, I caught flack for all men and no Patty Griffin ( Maine ); left SRV out on purpose. Saw Jimmy this summer, does that count? … This is a test. This is only a test. Had it been an actual emergency you would have been directed to tune your radio to Clyde Clifford’s Beaker Street(?) in Oklahoma City…That is a long, long time gone. Great music, certainly. Better days, who knows… ?


#20

One of the things people talking about Harvey need to consider is that Harvey was only a Category 4 Hurricane.
Imagine what could have happened if it had made it to Category 5.

Because, sooner or later, there will be a Category 5 Hurricane just as full of Rain as Harvey.
In fact, probably even More Rain.

It really doesn’t pay to fool around with Mother Nature.