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A Visit to Heaven and Hell


#1

A Visit to Heaven and Hell

Eduardo Galeano

Mapping Planet Earth

Birds are the only free beings in this world inhabited by prisoners. They fly from pole to pole, powered by food alone, on the route they choose and at the hour they wish, without ever asking permission of officials who believe they own the heavens.

#2

Err…this is for the Commondreams Editor,

The blurb in this (wonderful) article need to be updated… Eduardo Galeano died on 13 April 2015…

R.I.P.

I wonder if Obama ever actually read that copy of “Open Veins of Latin America” that Eduardo Galeano gave him.

Naah, probably not…


#3

OutSTANDING ! Yunzer, you would have to rain on this moment. Oh well, we all die, as was mentioned so well above. I’ve never felt so… akin.

I knew Scheherazade was there before I read the name (and I am a non-athlete with ten plus years experience as a soccer referee). That tale made me learn about the Ginni, and the rest of the harem’s tale. I will have to find my copy of Seiji Azawa conducting the San Francisco Philharmonic and listen to that tonight. Thank you Rimsky-Korsikov and Eduardo.


#4

Beautiful, thought provoking article. I love Galeano. Ha! A prophet is never appreciated in his own town.


#5

How did I rain on it? Galeano’s greatness is not depreciated by his death, but the Commondreams staff not even taking enough interest in him to know that he is dead sure reflects poorly on Commondreams!

Editor: When you correct the blurb, you can delete my posts.


#6

Music ( And Poetry ) the Bitter Sweet Language of the Soul

May We All Fly


#7

Thank you, Tom. I intend to read more Galeano now.


#8

On Saturday, April 18, 2009 Hugo Chavez handed Obama a copy in a televised event. It was later broadcast repeatedly around the world. There would be an oddly appropriate rhythm to the account if Galeano himself had previously given Obama a copy. Once can be forgiven, twice is a jilting given that Obama never publicly acknowledged being moved by recognition of the book’s content - obviously not in policy. If he did not, your question seems to me to become even more quintessentially Galeano. The perception and the perceived; the heinously modern aspect of media obfuscation of subject, object and the intent to assure failure to be perceived. A form of collateral damage, you might say, a coffin for the body politic.

Some wag once noted that: What is [television] but the spreading of darkness at the speed of light. Sounds like George Carlin to me.


#9

I saw him on his last reading tour to the US. Such a profoundly gentle man with a wonderful humor. And yet, at the same time, containing such a moral fury. How did he do it?


#10

I have read and kept all his books and they will remain with me and then with my heirs. Just ordered the “Hunter of Stories” releasing tomorrow (11/4/17). Galeano’s wisdom, deep well of feelings, and erudition capture the essence of being/life and live on in his writings…a gentle man filled with a fiery spirit. Timeless.

How prophetic: “The market for fear feeds on the steady demand for monsters.”


#11

Poor choice of words on my part. I wasn’t aware of his life, let alone his death. As I guessed, a quick search came up with the Wikipedia tickler “a literary giant of the left.” In the USof A one must purposely pursue socialist writings and thinkers (especially true if they are not of the north and not English speaking,) and I have not, as you well know. My loss, and my bad - I shouldn’t have addressed you at all. Was merely saddened that this voice I’d just read for the first time was already gone. Of course you’re right; anyone who communicates as clearly as in those brief nuggets above, is not diminished by death.


#12

Not to nitpick but it is Ozawa. I saw him conduct the San Francisco Symphony once in a program that included Andre Watts playing Liszt at the piano and a modern work entitled “Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima”. I appreciated his eclecticism as Music Director.


#13

Chavez gave that to Obama.

When I returned to the U.S. after years in Latin America, I gave that book to all my friends on their birthdays. Should be required reading in our schools.