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All This Economic Inequality Sucks, Say Most Americans


#1

All This Economic Inequality Sucks, Say Most Americans

Jon Queally, staff writer

The populist sentiment that is sweeping the nation has both a source and a solid base, according to new polling that shows a majority of Americans feel like the growing gap between the rich and the poor is cause for serious concern and should be proactively addressed by government policies.


#2

Its good to see the article today on "aid" to Africa in tandem with this article. Perhaps we're really beginning to grasp the 'externalization of costs' (also read: denial of consequences) so absolutely essential to the economic model of constant growth currently based on rapacious and predatory extraction by WB and IMF backed transnational corporations larger than many nations not to mention the peoples who live in Constitutionally protected territories as a result of treaties in the centuries long legacy of the colonization process on the planet. In terms of representation and the nature of identity the front line peoples are our teachers when it comes to understanding the impacts of Citizens United and the legacy of politicization of what is claimed to be law for the good of society. On top of that, 'society' can no longer be defined as excluding nature.

A researcher pointed out an interesting aspect of the 'anthropocene'. Utilizing a image from the visual arts - figure and ground - it was pointed out that throughout western history humans have been seen as the 'figure' and nature the 'ground' (just a background).

The industrial model has configured 'labor' to 'function' as something in the background, stripping identity (humanity) by aligning dominance as 'natural order'.

The system is proving to be a victim of its own "success". Like the weather phenomenon of an inversion layer, the cold air is sinking and the warm air rising in natural equilibrium dynamics.

The good of society being determined under paternalistic guardianship by industrialist interests has been proving to be a largely unmitigated disaster for far too long. Surviving the cumulative problems has proven problematic at best and all too often deadly for those who see and speak clearly and legitimately about reform.


#3

Once again Occupy was ineffective?


#4

Put aside the fact that even our Congress doesn't know much about our trade agreements; since of course, they don't have any real input in writing them. They've been more than happy to subcontract that hard choice out to the lobbyists and lawyers of the Corporatocracy in exchange for political contributions and a cushy public relations job, afterwards. Why would we then expect an informed citizenry on trade when we have a willfully ignorant political class? And, a public information and educational business model, the MSM ( mainstream media and " news " ), owned by that same Corporatocracy. That's another LMAO conundrum the NYT/CBSs of our nation never address. The TEEVEE monopolies make enormous sums of money off the status quo and the endless soap operas we call discussion of national policy and elections. Aside from that, though, the only outlier to a purely progressive Home Run Here is a minor quibble over whether fast food workers deserve $15 an hour. Another sloppy job by the media because, again, the Fast Food Corps. & Their MSM Lackeys never tell the people it only adds about .68 cents to a burger, fries and medium soda. Peanuts in the great scheme of things, really!! The Bernie Sanders and Ralph Naders are right on political sentiment, right on the facts, right on policies and we citizens either must decide to take to the streets en masse or surrender to the Oligarchy and a 1% Economy. We need to reorganize the priorities of this economy, almost everyone agrees on that, now it's up to the citizens to work the details. Because, of course, the political leaders have proven themselves to worthless and completely compromised, as usual.


#5

Your overview is quite accurate. In the long term, these policies of the WB and IMF, must be aggressively addressed because the U.S. uses a " surrender or die " expansionist foreign policy which really hasn't changed since The Crusades. Another bad thing we inherited from European Aristocracy and Organized Theocratic Policy/Politics. Shorter term, instead of going into the weeds on this globalization as a deep dead end, we need to focus on paying enough and caring enough ( domestic policy ) to capture the attention of the 47%, abandoned by the Romney Rules of The World. The ACA is a classic example of not giving the people what they want, what they need and what they can afford. And, at twice the cost ( $$$ ) of our competition! True insanity, that. Progress, on a variety of issues, should remain America's most important product. Progress for the 99s, that is.


#6

Nice poll to back up what we already knew...


#7

Possible new handle for you could be rolling stone. Since, from your current one, you haven't gathered that this doesn't show a 100% agreement with your assessment. Are you the type who, discovering the basement is on fire, sits back and tells everyone who'll listen, " Yep, I'll bet that fire will spread to the attic if something isn't done. Yep. "


#8

Are you the type to snap at people who agree with you? I think you are.
That sort of behavior doesn't help what ever it is you are pretending to believe in here. Perhaps you could try getting up on the other side of the bed tomorrow morning.


#9

We don't already know 100% of these things. ( I'm not usually impressed by polling, either. ) That was my point and you responded like " same old, same old " or " move along here, nothing to see ". To my surprise, actually, I was surprised on the negative response to Fight for $15. More work/education needs to be done there when 70% of fast food workers are women and that broadens the issue to gov't supported daycare and other topics. Sorry, but I think what we assume other people know about these things is dangerous. And, I don't think we need any more commissions, studies, polls or other pacifiers, either. IMO, what we need is a Progressive version of the Contract With America. Any Federal office seeker, running as a Democrat/Green/Independent asking for voter support signs it or they can " go fish ". After 2016 all bets are off regarding the existence of a Democratic Party, going forward. H.S. Thompson said, after the 1968 elections, that no progress for the majority will be achieved until the Democratic Party goes the way of the Whigs. I tended to agree then, and I fully agree now with his observation, after seeing what has transpired in the last 25 years. But, I apologize for offending you.


#10

Say Bernie wins the election. What happens next?


#11

Well, let's see. Waving The Surrender Flag for 7 years hasn't worked for the Obama Adm. Nor, would it work for a Clinton Adm., either. So, the " very bloody pulpit " and an attack on media complacency and their obvious elitist sympathies/owners worked for the Roosevelts. And, finally, kicking the old Confederate States out of the Union or making them surrender again, would be good for starters. s/ Really, would America miss Sens. Jeff Sessions and Richard Shelby of Alabama, Vetter and Cassidy from Louisiana or, for that matter, Texas's Sens. Cornyn and Cruz? The MIC, The Family Research Council, Pamela Geller and Big Oil would, most others, not so much.


#12

I meant, what would really happen?


#13

My tea leaves are shipped from California so they're much harder to read during severe drought conditions.


#14

Public attitudes have always been similar to those expressed in this poll - going way back before occupy - and are generally well to the left of the elite viewpoints the corporate media trumpets. For example, substantial majorities of those in the US have always favored a Canada-style single-payer healthcare too.

The magic of the corporate media is that they lead most USAns to believe the prevailing viewpoints of their community is well to the right of their own - so, feeling isolated, they will either keep their mouths shut or go along with the minority reactionary agenda out of fear of being called a "socialist".


#15

Don't they also have to kick out Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Maine and a number of others? The governments of these states are at about as hard-right reactionary as any southern state. The idea that southern US states are uniquely reactionary and racist has not been valid for decades. Their more conservative voting patterns is simply a consequence of their small urban populations. Take Philadelphia and Pittsburgh away and Pennsylvania would probably be well to the right of Texas.


#16

Take the cities of Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco and Sacramento out of California and your left with something resembling Arizona. Take your car out of the garage, turn right 4 times and park it in the same parking space. Take my wife,... please! As for the Old Confederate States the racist, segregationist actions were overt and legally enforced by statutes. The voting laws, and on and on....these states, including Texas, are receiving about 15% more in gov't benefits ( subsidies ) than they pay in. Their labor and union laws are regressive. Their environmental laws are lax... Sorry, but in many ways the South is retrograde and a huge drag on even the Northern conservative leaning states. The South was built on free labor and free energy ( slavery ) and doesn't want to adapt to the 21st Century. Not my problem.


#17

That's just the rabble talking. No one who counts is worried about income inequality.


#18

Sorry, you misunderstood me. I get misunderstood a lot and part of that is my poor choice of words in most cases. I know that we can be a grouchy bunch here. This world gives us much to be grouchy about. I really do appreciate that "a study" supports what we already knew... Your thoughts about the Democratic Party folding is interesting. Personally, I'd like to see both of the Ds and Rs to fold.