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Amid Civil War Ghosts, Sanders says: 'I Worry about Future of Democracy in America'


#1

Amid Civil War Ghosts, Sanders says: 'I Worry about Future of Democracy in America'

Jon Queally, staff writer

While campaigning in Pennsylvania on Friday ahead of next week's primary in that state, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders took time to visit the Civil War memorial at Gettysburg and invoked the spirit of Abraham Lincoln as he expressed concern about the troubling direction the nation is now heading.


#2

"Four score and seven years ago..." Why did Lincoln use this language? What is four score and seven years? I think he used this round about way of saying eighty seven years to make the audience think, and by so doing place greater emphasis on the year 1776. Lincoln could have used any number of important dates, not the least of which is 1789, he chose the nation's birth as being with The Declaration, not the Constitution. He knew the Constitution to be a work in progress, it legalized slavery and had other aristocratic elements. The Declaration is the great democratic document of U. S. History., all "men" are created equal. Bernie's effort truly is an attempt to give real meaning to government Of, By, and For the people.


#3

Never realized that -- Lincoln stressing the Declaration of Independence rather than the Constitution.

We are taught to celebrate the Constitution rather than the Declaration of Independence ..
though we have a schizophrenic Constitution which -- rather than establishing a basis for equality for all --
actually created a patriarchy -- and they then granted them Elite status via land grants and immense
influence over our nation's wealth, natural resources, animal-life -- and in general over our government.
They not only had a great advantage over the people to control them and the future of the nation --
they had the will to destroy democracy and the time to do it.

Our Constitution also made a pact with slave owners in supporting the System of Slavery which led to the Civil
War. Not only supporting that system, but protecting it via militias and the "Runaway Slave Act."
Even after Emancipation, our government failed to provide any compensation for former slaves, or to protect
them during 100 years of Segregation which prevented them from exercising their rights of full citizenship --
to vote and to run for office.

All of this makes clear just who has ruled our nation from its very first days and the lie of a "people's
government.

We have a choice between two 1%'ers -- Trump and Hillary -- or Sanders.
Sanders has given us a Revolution on a platter -- we need to find a way to move it forward for all time.


#4

It's another way of saying, "four generations ago." 20 years was roughly one generation. By 1863 the nation was "old" and all of the patriots had died off.

I'm sad that Bernie is coming to town exactly when we have a critical meeting.


#5

It is disappointing that none of the candidates are focusing on the surveillance society. If that is not a threat to democracy I don't know what is. Lincoln of course could never imagined a society where personal information was constantly streaming from cell phones and computers into the hands of corporations and even in many instances to government agencies. Not to mention surveillance cameras on the streets and facial recognition software able to identify people as they go by. And we are now entering the next stage which is the Internet of Things. Data will now be streaming from cars traveling the streets with or without drivers, refrigerators, TVs, electrical systems, heating systems, whatever. Even if corporate campaign contributions were zero democracy is in trouble. Even if everyone in the US made the same income democracy is in trouble. If corporations and the government can know pretty much what all citizens are doing and even in many cases what their physiological status is at any given time is democracy really possible?


#6

The articles of confederation precede the current constitution, which is mostly concerned with commerce and a few amendments. The articles of confederation made war difficult and are lambasted by history.


#7

Everyone knows that the democracy we take for granted is under attack, by those who live above the law.
Sanders is the ONLY candidate from whom we will hear this concern.


#9

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#10

'course another candidate we all know might have referred to the Declaration as a naive and non-realistic attempt to change the status quo….


#11

pretty sure Bernie voted against the Patriot Act, and if we get corporate money out of politics, we won't have to employ so many surveillance people, so he's still best by far on that.


#12

Another key was no imperial supreme court for life semi royal third branch.

Plan b Bernie will look to other interesting aspects of the articles of confederation. For example; declaration of war — The articles of confederation made war very difficult.


#13

We need to put corporations back in the box ... obviously.

At one time, corporations would be erected to deal with one project or another --
and then folded again.

And, we need to put our anti-trust laws back in action while we await that "putting back in the box."

Especially since Elites/Royals/Wealthy seem to have morphed into corporations.


#15

And rightly lambasted by history. The Articles were a disaster.

Each state only had one vote in Congress, regardless of size.
Congress did not have the power to tax.
Congress did not have the power to regulate foreign and interstate commerce.
There was no executive branch to enforce any acts passed by Congress.
There was no national court system.
Amendments to the Articles of Confederation required a unanimous vote.
Laws required a 9/13 majority to pass in Congress.
Under the Articles of Confederation, each state was concerned with preserving their own sovereignty and power. This led to frequent arguments between the states. In addition, the states would not willingly give money to financially support the national government.

The national government was powerless to enforce any acts that Congress passed. Further, some states began to make agreements with foreign governments. Almost every state had its own military. Each printed its own money. This along with issues with trade meant that there was no stable economy.

Just imagine how the the Peculiar Institution would have prospered in this system. Imagine these sovereign states fighting for the land to the west, slavery might end up all over this land. The Articles were a disaster.


#16

A model for how distributed intelligence focuses?

The eerie part of real democracy is where it is going is like predicting the weather. No single human or human organization can see far enough to decipher distributed intelligence.


#17

Okay. Let's imagine.

Would it have been possible for the imperfect confederation you describe to unleash organized genocide on the indigenous nations?

I think not.

What alternate non violent evolution might the US have taken? That is a rich question for writers to explore from every angle.


#18

They would have been just as genocidal, the slaves were there, the indigenous people would be just as persecuted, but individually by state. Slavery would extend well into the next century under such petty fiefdoms.


#21

Of course, but whatever happened, The Articles were a dissolution waiting to happen.


#22

Good for you. Have you crossed paths with any former students?

Yes, about distributed intelligence focusing in some undefined manner. That is why we remain collectively gullible to hierarchy etc. Another perspective is distributed intelligence as an aspect of cosmic powered biology, full partner in accelerating big bang still banging.

Brain washing is futile from this perspective.


#23
A curious thing happened on the way to the Democratic nomination. Quite unexpectedly, an over-whelming majority of young people throughout the land flocked to Sanders. Since his message is political revolution, that has to give the establishment indigestion. Before Sanders, the only advantage the 99% had was its numerical superiority. That, and a few were fed up enough to be willing to throw their bodies on the gears. But that has changed drastically during Sanders’ campaign. This youthful passion to change the status quo, channeled into concerted action, will move mountains. This is power worthy of determined encouragement by the others of the 99%.

The percentage of young people supporting Sanders is stupefying in itself, but even more striking is the manner they chose to do it, not in the streets but in social networking, online organizing, and hands on persuasion. Not since the sixties have we seen this degree of willingness to engage in public affairs by the youth, but these in a practical, thoughtful manner. Not flower children; the flower of a generation. Now, those among the 1% who are accustomed to exploiting their wealth, to press their advantages relentlessly, are probably taken aback, just as the rest of the country has. But make no mistake, even now they are plotting to nip things in the bud, and if need be, trample the flowers into the ground.

#25

But the task of keeping people ignorant has been made difficult to impossible with the arrived of the Internet which connects the global community. That's precisely the reason why people 45 and younger support Bernie Sanders by wide margins. That age group gets it's information from the internet.