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Are Protests Enough to Bring Down the G20?


#1

Are Protests Enough to Bring Down the G20?

Srecko Horvat

According to a recent poll, every third person living in Hamburg wants to leave the city during the G20 summit on July 7-8. Their decision is not surprising: who is crazy enough to be in a city with Trump, Erdogan, Putin, Merkel and the Saudis, 20,000 policeman and most likely 100,000 people protesting on the streets?


#2

These G20 protests are important in their own right, but they provide the same important questions to be asked for any resistance movement to Trump and the Republicans, here at home. The many observations Horvat makes apply to our political situation in the U.S. Given that the Democratic party stubbornly clings to its corporate ways, the resistance in this country still has no political representation or organized home front going into the 2018 election cycle.


#3

I'm going with "No" for 200, Alex.


#4

Nobody in their right mind would advocate to "bring down" the G20. It is an ideal forum for the world leaders to meet and discuss as well as, hopefully, resolve some of their differences.

It is also an ideal stage for protesters to present their views and make their voices heard, through the megaphone of global media and show the leaders, where we stand and what we won't stand for. Neither Erdogan nor King Salman of Saudi Arabia get any enough or even any of that at home.

I am aware, that many would like to add Putin to that list, but with an approval rating hovering around 80% at home, he is pretty well fortified against anything protesters in Hamburg can throw at him.


#5

This will do little to bring about productive change in the progressive direction. Here are the first three paragraphs to the FirstRateCrowd website. I suggest if you like what you read here that you then go to the site and join up as I did to actually get something done. There is a way out and it is not just by protesting.

Respectfully,

Dr. Lipkowitz

Let there be no doubt, the single most important aspect we are really battling for here is to control the future—our future—for the good of the whole. Will we control it or let the wealthy elite control our destiny? Make no mistake; what happens here will determine the outcome of humanity.

We are fast approaching the Technological Singularity, an era of runaway technological growth, where the wealthy elite will continue to manipulate Income Inequality and Economic Inequality more and more to their advantage. In the end they will gain the unrestricted authority to control our lives—that is—if we are even allowed to live at all.

Taking action now is the only way for us to survive. At long last we must awake, open our eyes, and act on our own behalf; not doing so guarantees humanity’s death. Join us to stop them now before it is too late.


#6

What's your doctorate in?


#7

Does that really matter??


#8

Don't ask me, I'm not the one who brought it up.


#9

I agree completely, but, given the reality of our two party system and the unlikely possibility of a third party managing to get even 1/4 of the popular vote, I do believe we must work from within the Democratic party, bring as many Independents under the progressive umbrella as possible, and not let the fringe parties (Libertarian, Green, etc.) siphon away any of these voters.

BTW, two-time US Green party candidate, Jill Stein was sitting at the table with Flynn and Putin at the 12/10/15 anniversary celebration of Russian TV network (RT; Putin's state controlled propaganda machine and what passes for news in Russia)... what's up with that, Jill?? Was she paid by RT/Putin as well? We do know that her campaign was heavily promoted by RT. Her vote totals in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan were all greater than Clinton's margin of defeat and ended up denying Clinton the electoral college win. All of this was written up for NBCNews.com ("Guess who came to dinner with Flynn and Putin" by Robert Windrem), but I don't think it was broadcast - could be wrong. But I digress...

Progressives must organize around a "more progressive" Democrat than the typical corporate Democrat. I don't know if that is Elizabeth Warren, but I do like her ideas and drive. I wish Bernie were a Democrat... and were a few years younger. Maybe a Bernie/Elizabeth or Elizabeth/Bernie ticket? I honestly cannot name another Democrat who does not have corporate ties. Maybe Adam Schiff or Kamala Harris but I have not done the research, although I am impressed with how both of them have handled themselves during these Congressional investigations. Ultimately, in 2018 and 2020, progressives need to mobilize the rest of the country that has not participated in elections at all. Amazingly, these non-voting citizens represent something like 60% of the electorate. After a couple of years of Trump, I imagine many of those individuals will be ready to jump into the fray and cast their first votes. We need to be ready to bring them to our progressive candidates, whoever they end up being.


#10

OK a quick google search (which would need further confirmation) tells me Schiff has strong ties to weapons manufacturing, so he's probably not our progressive candidate! Further, he seems to think progressives and Trump resistance activists equate with the Tea Party ("Adam Sciff is a Moderate war Hawk, Not the Liberal Hero Democrats Need" posted on observer.com by Michael Sainato).


#11

I just saw commercial video of violent G20 night protests in Hamburg--the kind of thing news outlets always highlight: individuals prancing around taunting police (as though their only audience was the police), setting fires, just displaying themselves waving their warms, or braving water cannons alone rather than with any body-to-body solidarity line. Of course they were knocked over! This might've been exhilarating to those people, and I understand the anger, but it is less than helpful and just confirms the establishment's notion that they alone are rational. Groups who have alternative policy visions need an orchestrated public voice (and farther-reaching outlets than Democracy Now!). The media I checked didn't even report on the ideas peaceful people brought to Hamburg. With no media exposure, however politically astute or correct they're just dreaming or chanting to the choir.

A monster has to be attacked from all sides. Let some groups try to work within the Dem Party, float progressive candidates for office, and figure out themselves whether this is a good idea; others with already established efforts of churches and ngos, or local institutions, political networks, and immigration groups. Let others weasel their way into schools, speak from their university platforms, and do public education efforts; let still others join large scale well-funded environmental groups that haven't sold out and advocate for going bolder; support their lawsuits . . . . But let us PLEASE have more coordination of efforts, and not proliferation of more little organizations or self-aggrandizing Twitter storms--and recognize the limits of the type of exhibitionist individualism on night display in Hamburg.


#12

My left-wing uncle and aunt liked Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio.
Although he has retired from Congress and from running for President.

Maybe you can go deeper into the minor leagues. Many people in Seattle like Socialist Kshama Sawant. Or maybe you can persuade Rep. Keith Ellison to run. :slight_smile:


#13

Words Matter---"internet commons"--how about we simply support the COMMONS! Who owns the land,water,natural resources------Why are these protesters resorting to violence----because they have no voice-----The G20 is a meeting of the elite to figure out how to keep the wealth in their hands.
The number one issue on the world stage should be calling out the US AS THE WORLDS BIGGEST ARMS DEALER. Trumps idea of a great deal is selling MEGA weapons to Saudi Arabia with no concern of the consequences.Then all kinds of guns are funneled to Mexico from the US destabilizing the whole country.
Just as "healthcare is a right" cuts through the corporate media BS the word COMMONS speaks of something real but forgotten.