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Are we Egypt?


#1

Are we Egypt?

Tom Hastings

When the world watched Egyptians bravely gather en masse in Tahrir Square in Cairo in January 2011 to Arab Spring Hosni Mubarak out of office, we were mightily impressed and most of us cheered the nonviolent resistance.

The western press lionized the Egyptian military as it seemed to support the uprising and the generals kindly offered to run the country on an interim basis. Sure enough, there was an election eventually, Mohammed Morsi won, and the military handed over power.

For a minute.


#2

“None of these generals is a Dwight Eisenhower, all are dedicated to the Trump agenda—ramping up global climate chaos, sowing race hate and violence, targeting refugees and immigrants fleeing from wars we supply arms to wage, rolling back civil rights, being cozy with the likes of autocrats Putin, Duterte, and yes, General al-Sisi, while scorning democratic humane clean energy leaders like Merkel.”

The authors analysis is very accurate - malleable lock-step generals have risen to the top, while those of wider experience and integrity - like General Eisenhower - have been cashiered-out and forced in to retirement- like Admiral William “Fox” Fallon, replaced by MIC sycophants and career Pentagon ass-kissers.

“The problem in defense is how far you can go without destroying from within what you are trying to defend from without.” - Dwight D. Eisenhower

Fallon said “the constant drumbeat of conflict” out of Washington about war with Iran was “not helpful and not useful - An attack on Iran will not happen on my watch.”

The path to overt fascism has its roots in for-profit war - “When Fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross” perhaps led by a general serving a pathological ignorant idiot rather than our civilian republic.


#3

Actually some of the military types are Deep State folks intent on neutering Trump. Needles to say, in this intra-power elite struggle we are the losers.


#4

Great piece lousy title! It needed a reference to the generals!

Who is handing over what? Is it Trump hiring ‘the Generals’ or were the ‘Generals’ imposed on the Trump White House overshadowed by looming impeachment? Did the Repubs lay down the law to the princeling? Accept (appoint) the ‘Generals’ or you face impeachment hearings without the Republican party’s support!

It sure looks like the man with lots of free time to golf and tweet and watch TV, has that free time because the ‘Generals’ are already running things.


#5

Trump may have been pressured into putting the general in charge after A.Mooch’s string of vulgar tirades. It doesn’t seem like a move he would make-it calls for logical thinking. (Not that I’m excited about generals in charge of staff at the White House)


#6

Is it me or did Trump go on vacation a few days after North Korea launched a long range missile and thereby precipitated a hot war (irradiated hot) crisis situation that is now absorbing the best minds in our government in trying to dampen a dangerous and unwelcome nuclear instability? Was Trump told to ‘leave the room because the adults are talking’?

The Repubs don’t want to make it that obvious but they don’t want Trump either. The problem is that they don’t want anixonian impeachment battle! Trump has embarrassed himself, our country and most of all… he stands now in the spotlight of history as a petty and reckless (and corrupt) fool. Trump and Kim together is too much of a bad thing for everybody!

‘How did you do on the 18 today Mr. President? Gee that’s great! Gonna’ do better tomorrow? Great! Great!’


#7

Quite possible, he has alienated so many with his arrogance and ignorant rants/provocations and enormous ego/pathology. On the other hand calmer war-mongers may just want some time absent his insanity to plan how to profit without being blown-up. We are likely screwed either way, as has been usual. Peace


#8

i see a related, much deeper problem throughout our society - the General-styled rule of CEOs in the economy. People who “get things done” and impose chain-of-command and tight messaging, with the skilled support of well-staffed Human Resources Management and Public Relations departments.

We need daylight, and democracy, throughout society and the economy. Not just in Egypt, or the White House.


#9

I think it should be pointed out that the Muslim Brotherhood completely deceived the public. First they promised not to run enough candidates to control the legislature but they did and won control. Then Morsi claimed that he would not turn Egypt into a religious state but he and the legislature promptly passed laws to turn Egypt into a religious state. So the deception became obvious and the military acted. And now things are worse than ever. You have to feel sorry for all the protestors who wanted a secular democratic state because although they did get a secular state it is a horrible military dictatorship. We could turn into Egypt if people don’t resist. We have a much better press and courts than Egypt had but Trump is whittling away at democracy. It is eroding slowly and many people may not even notice.


#10

The system is rigged by Neoliberal Democrats for Banana Republicans.

For how long will the people stay on the hamster wheel? Countries are dumping the rigged pay for play system. They are taking their cue from the Swiss and switching to grassroots democratic systems having great success in addressing inequality.


#11

Tom, I hope enough Americans have enough of an understanding of history to heed your warnings!
I must say, however, that I have my doubts.


#12

Very well put, Emphyrio! I love the Ike quote. Had not seen that one.


#13

The author intentionally omitted that fact the 30 million Egyptians made the largest gathering in humanity to get rid of Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood (a terrorist group), then and only after 30 million took to the streets did the army interfere,.

This only proves that the author colludes with them (Muslim Brotherhood) or has been paid to write such an article.


#14

At least this article didn’t repeat the falsehood that Obama and HRC had pushed out Mubarak. Mubarak at the time was nearly 80 years old and his health was evidently poor. Before his ouster I read articles about the succession, and that many people weren’t comfortable with Mubarak’s plan to slot his son for the job. Mubarak was headed for the exit regardless of what Obama or HRC might have done.

At the time of Mubarak’s ouster I read many statements from the far-American left, people you might find here, who were heartened by what had happened, and hoped for our own Tahrir Square to oust our own government.

The largest organized opposition group in Egypt is the Muslim Brotherhood. If you were to write down words describing the Muslim Brotherhood and their beliefs you would find yourself using many words that people here use to describe Republicans: right-wing, glued to the Bible (Quran), religious-fundamentalist-oppressive, bitter-clingers to their guns and religion, impose their religion on others, and so forth.

– Many people here should look at themselves and examine themselves for hypocrisy: fans of such people as the Muslim Brotherhood over there, and opponents of such people here at home.


#15

the comparison isn’t a good one, even though I agree that the whitehouse’s militarization of that staff bodes ill.

first, the egyptian and US military are not synonymous. They are radically different institutions. in Egypt, the military is one of the largest business and property holders in the state. In the US, they control much, but own nothing.

second, the coup in Egypt was largely a result of Morsi’s proposed reforms of the judiciary, which was the branch vital to protecting military ownership of public assets. A clean judiciary would’ve threatened the sweetheart deal Egyptian generals had for decades in which their loyalty was a product of their profits from their enterprises.

Egyptian generals had a strong financial motive to topple morsi. Here in the US, there is no such motive.

Most of these officers are retired from service, and the US has a long history of retired officers going on to serve in civilian capacities. This is as old as the country itself.

There are far bigger concerns than a military coup.


#16

Exactly, either you believe in Democracy or you don’t.