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Arpaio Pardon: The First Verifiable Impeachable Offense?


#1

Arpaio Pardon: The First Verifiable Impeachable Offense?

Tom Sullivan

The fallout from the president’s pardon of Joe Arpaio is as thick as it is toxic. Almost as heavy as the rains from Hurricane Harvey. Whether either will do sufficient damage to our “child king” (as one Republican member of Congress described the president) to limit further damage to the fabric of the nation is still to be determined.


#2

From what I hear the clearer impeachability comes from his having asked Sessions before the judge convicted Arpaio whether it could be prevented. That makes it clear the pardon was intended to obstruct justice. But also remember that the pardon does not void the conviction, and in fact Arpaio’s accepting the pardon constitutes, according to SCOTUS, a confession of guilt, and makes his conviction no longer eligible for appeal.


#3

It’s nuts to think a pardon is an impeachable offense … but then … humans are insane.


#4

Appeal? Who needs to appeal when he’s already been pardoned? I seriously doubt that the a**hole is concerned about a ‘confession of guilt’ after having gotten away with horrors for decades.

This executive pardon is reprehensible on many levels. Arpaio deserved to spend that paltry six months in jail. Contempt of court = contempt for the law, something he and Trump share. While I have been reluctant to call for impeachment (for fear of Pence) in the past - this president is condoning lawlessness against people of color and should be thrown in jail himself.


#5

Glenn Greenwald retweeted this:

It’s a reply to a tweet about Arpaio’s department burning a dog to death in front of his sobbing owner. It’s a really high level of psycho-evil if true, and whoever was there representing law enforcement should be fired and in prison.

Even if Arpaio can’t be jailed for what he was convicted of this time, there are other crimes to go after him on, and other people involved who could be prosecuted.

Would Trump pardon him each time? Maybe, but it still might be worth it.


#6

He’d announced intention to appeal, rescinding his waiver of jury trial on no grounds but not liking the judge’s ruling (and the flimsy point that the judge released her ruling to the press before reading it in court to himself). But confession / appeal / pardon is all a matter of law, not what he’s concerned about or what we think. We have to stay focused on the legalities and not get carried away with normal life. djt doesn’t know the law, and fortunately has in several cases acted rashly on his assumption of privilege rather than understanding where he is under law.


#9

A crime. And grounds for impeachment.


#11

Not for me to define:


#12

Even the greatest of nations may suffer a catastrophic leader, but the nation can survive the test and protect its resilience — if the public stays true to its values, institutions and traditions. That was true two millennia ago, and remains true today.

OMG. We are a nation with no defined values. Our institutions are riddled with systemic oppression towards the poor, people of color, First Nations, non-cisgendered people, and certain practitioners of religion. Our traditions have morphed into reasons to spend ever more money on stuff we don’t really need.

I ask, What rule of law? The rule of law that says you can change the rule of law whenever anyone or anything ponies up enough money?

The nutshell: What is clearly not working now for We the People. has never worked for the We the People, without an uprising by We the People, in the form of a social movement making demands. There have been a few truly democratic moments in our history, and they were created by We the People, not our institutions. Many of those gains have been lost in recent years as corporations and their wealthy directors and boards buy up both GOP and Democratic government officials. Resist with every fiber of your being!

Arpaio’s pardon serves as a reminder to privileged folks just how institutionalized racism is in this country. When it seems like justice is about to be served (and a very small dollop of it at that), some other lever is pulled to deny it.