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As 1.5 Million Flee Hurricane Florence, Worries Grow Over Half Dozen Nuclear Power Plants in Storm's Path


#102

Trog –

Solar installations nor wind will cause evacuations to save the lives of citizens.

I have every idea that the companies themselves will NOT take the risk even if they could
find an insurance company – a million to one prospect that it wouldn’t happen –
because the private company and the government would want the public to back what is
overwhelming costs: What’s Fukushima cost so far? How about Chernobyl?

Fukushima nuclear clean-up to cost $58 bn - Phys.org
phys.org
Fukushima nuclear clean-up to cost $58 bn … ($58 billion), far more than the 1 trillion yen the government has so far allocated. …

No one needs me to supply a reason why using nuclear reactors to boil water for steam is insane.
Everyone is capable of thinking that one out for themselves.

Radiation is good for fish and humans? Don’t think so.

I don’t have to present anything – you’re making the insanities clear.

But I’d also encourage readers to find out for themselves the dangers of nuclear reactors –

NOTE –

Nuclear Power Plants Threaten Drinking Water for 49 Million …
** environmentamerica.org/news/ame/nuclear-power… **
he drinking water for 49 million Americans could be at risk of radioactive contamination from a leak or accident at a local nuclear power plant, according to a new study released today by Environment America Research & Policy Center and the US Public Interest Research Group Education Fund.

**Toxic water at Fukushima likely contaminating sea - Japan’s …www.rt.com/news/fukushima-nuclear-water… **
On Tuesday, the electric giant that is in charge of the nuclear disaster cleanup said that the levels of possibly cancer-causing radioactive substances in the ground waters at the plant have risen 90 times in just three days. The test results show that cesium-134 levels in the ground water are 150 times the legal level.

**Nuclear Power Plants, Radiation & Drinking Water **
Although some people assert that nuclear power plants pose, at worst, a mostly-manageable threat to our drinking water, many environmental groups strongly disagree. Despite the disagreements, some important facts cannot be disputed. Firstly, nuclear power plants, in spite of disasters like the one in Japan, will continue to be built and operated. Secondly, since the purpose of such plants is to produce boiled water with which to power huge electricity generators, water will continue to be consumed by such plants in huge quantities. Thirdly, a substantial amount of the water thus used will continue to be dangerously contaminated since we do not yet have the capacity to completely control radiation.

The nuclear crisis in Japan is good example of the dangers of nuclear power. A week after the partial meltdown of their nuclear plants, high levels of radionuclides were found in the surrounding water sources. Seawater collected 330 meters from the crippled plants showed levels of iodine-131 were 126 times higher than the maximum limit set by the Japanese government. This radioactive iodine can accumulate in the thyroid and as it decays, it will cause damage to the gland. It is among the family of radionuclides that can cause increased thyroid cancer and disease risk for human beings. It was so bad, that Japan’s health ministry even advised residents in five towns in Fukushima Prefecture to avoid using tap water for making formula milk for babies due to abnormally high radiation levels detected in the water. **
** https://www.freedrinkingwater.com/water_quality/quality1/1-nuclear-power-plant-radiation-water.htm


#103

I highly encourage you to actually look up a diagram of a boiling water reactor. It would really help you understand why I am so heavily questioning your claims.

Notice that in this diagram the main coolant plumbing feeds directly into and out of the reactor core. If these pipes ruptured the lower containment structure would be filled with coolant and steam from the nuclear reactor measuring about 300 degrees C. With this in mind lets look at a quote of someone in the article you are using as evidence: “I personally saw pipes that came apart and I assume that there were many more that had been broken throughout the plant. There’s no doubt that the earthquake did a lot of damage inside the plant,”

If this employee was talking about the coolant pipes this would indicate that he was standing directly next to plumbing where 300 degree C (572 degrees F) steam was filling into the room. At those temperatures he would be 100% dead. Furthermore this steam would not have gone through wetwell suppression pools, which means that he would have received a fatal dose of radiation. The event you are describing would be impossible for this employee to describe in an interview days after the incident, because we would’ve been dead before he even left the plant.

Another good indication that your source is absolutely not talking about coolant pipes is this quote: “It felt like the earthquake hit in two waves, the first impact was so intense you could see the building shaking, the pipes buckling, and within minutes, I saw pipes bursting. Some fell off the wall”
These coolant pipes are not secured on the walls of a reactor, as these pipes have to flow into and out of the reactor core. This employee is not talking about coolant pipes. There is a significant amount of MEP in a nuclear reactor that does not have anything to do with coolant.

“But I was severely alarmed because as I was leaving I was told and I could see that several pipes had cracked open, including what I believe were cold water supply pipes.”
I have a very hard time believing they were cold water supply pipes, because those pipes are under high pressure. If the pipe was cracked open then his story would absolutely include an anecdote about how coolant was flowing out of pipe onto the floor.

“Sometime between 4 and 6 a.m. on March 12, Masao Yoshida, the plant manager decided it was time to pump seawater into the reactor core and notified TEPCO.”
How do you pump seawater into a reactor core if all the plumbing connections into the reactor core are destroyed?


#104

Parlimentary Report described by the NYT July 5, 2012:

The nuclear accident at Fukushima was a preventable disaster rooted in government-industry collusion…

The 641-page report criticized Tepco as being too quick to dismiss earthquake damage as a cause of the fuel meltdowns at three of the plant’s six reactors, which overheated when the site lost power. Tepco has contended that the plant withstood the earthquake that rocked eastern Japan, instead placing blame for the disaster on what some experts have called a “once in a millennium” tsunami that followed. Such a rare calamity was beyond the scope of contingency planning, Tepco executives have suggested, and was unlikely to pose a threat to Japan’s other nuclear reactors in the foreseeable future.

The parliamentary report, based on more than 900 hours of hearings and interviews with 1,167 people, suggests that Reactor No. 1, in particular, might have suffered earthquake damage, including the possibility that pipes burst from the shaking, leading to a loss of coolant even before the tsunami hit the plant about 30 minutes after the initial earthquake. It emphasized that a full assessment would require better access to the inner workings of the reactors, which may not be possible for years.


#105

And likewise, we could have reactors which also would never require evacuations.

“What’s Fukushima cost so far? How about Chernobyl?”

Their cost has nothing to do with the insurability of entirely different kinds of reactors which could never experience any meltdown failures like those.

“No one needs me to supply a reason why using nuclear reactors to boil water for steam is insane.
Everyone is capable of thinking that one out for themselves.”

In other words, you couldn’t think of a single reason it’s insane.

“Radiation is good for fish and humans? Don’t think so.”

In other words, you couldn’t find a single example of a biological effect on any Pacific marine or West Coast species, so you are trying to cover that up by arguing against a claim I never made.

“I don’t have to present anything – you’re making the insanities clear.”

In other words, you couldn’t come up with any science-based argument for why dumping the water from Fukushima in the Pacific would be insane–or even harmful to anything.

And also still nothing on how letting this water freeze on Antarctica could harm anything.

“But I’d also encourage readers to find out for themselves the dangers of nuclear reactors –”

I think you mean the dangers of some nuclear reactors.

“Nuclear Power Plants Threaten Drinking Water for 49 Million …”

Or more specifically, today’s nuclear power plants (at low risk). But we could have plants for which there would be no such contamination risk.

“Toxic water at Fukushima likely contaminating sea”

With said contamination only being at significant levels close to the harbor. And again, this only has relevance to reactors which can have a core meltdown.

“Despite the disagreements, some important facts cannot be disputed. Firstly, nuclear power plants, in spite of disasters like the one in Japan, will continue to be built and operated.”

There will probably be no more old-tech reactors built in the U.S.

“Secondly, since the purpose of such plants is to produce boiled water with which to power huge electricity generators,”

Nuclear reactors could be used for other purposes, and they could use non-steam generators, and smaller nuclear plants wouldn’t need huge generators.

“water will continue to be consumed by such plants in huge quantities.”

The water isn’t “consumed”. It is taken in, warmed, and released. And smaller nukes could operate by air-cooling.

“Thirdly, a substantial amount of the water thus used will continue to be dangerously contaminated since we do not yet have the capacity to completely control radiation.”

The cooling water is used to cool the condensers to turn steam back into water so that it doesn’t take as much energy to inject it back into the boiler. The boiling water loop is separate from the coolant water. And in PWR reactors, the boiling water loop is also separate from the core-coolant water.

“The nuclear crisis in Japan is good example of the dangers of nuclear power.”

Or rather, the dangers of aging, old-tech nuclear power.

“A week after the partial meltdown of their nuclear plants, high levels of radionuclides were found in the surrounding water sources. Seawater collected 330 meters from the crippled plants showed levels of iodine-131 were 126 times higher than the maximum limit set by the Japanese government.”

Which only has application to reactors which can melt down and release iodine-131. For some reactors, such as molten salt reactors, there would be no such risk.


#106

Do we have the chance of six Fukushimas here? Why did we build nuclear power plants in an area subject to hurricane damage? When in hell are our government planners going to look beyond their noses?


#107

Because we have tech wannabes like Trog and ol Swanee.

Ask them about the USS Regan which sailed into the Radioactive plume from Fukushima.

It’s SO SAFE. We are entering a new Atomic Age.
Locals will experience that Age as Clean Up Sites.

But let us confuse you with lights, bells and whistles, cause it ain’t ENGINEERING.
Let me dazzle you with my knowledge of “ISOTOPES”

Shit…I spent half of my career cleaning up after these kind of twerps.
They are full of it and will never admit it.
Industry shills who only show up for these articles, to pump BS.

It is estimated that it will take 4-5 years to move the Diablo Canyon Rods, and
it is virtually sitting on the San Andreas Fault.
And no Swanee, the rods aren’t processed and in casks, god what a lie.

But they won’t talk about the 70+ sailors suffering medical problems and cancers.
Nor will they talk about the sailors that died or the birth defects.

And the Navy and Tepco are taking the Agent Orange route to resolution.
Class actions suits continually dismissed for non jurisdiction.
Japan Poisons US Sailors, so where IS jurisdiction, evidently not Home Port.

Christ the Commander sailed into radioactive debris waters with his water system still open,
thus contaminating all onboard Reverse Osmosis Systems,
Now you have a carrier and crew without fresh water. NONE

This is the way the untrained perform under stress, using False Science,
Perpetrated by the Industry Shills, and this is the position Trog and ol Swanee want you to sign up for blindly.

Wait, let me blind you with Pseudo Science…It has worked in the past…


#108

Molten Flouride Salts…ha ha ha ha

How corrosive could that be to engineer around…LOTS

Must be why there are SO MANY in production.


#109

I highly encourage you to tell the truth about something in your articles


#110

Trog –

We DO NOT have reactors which aren’t a problem – or insurable.

The water is “consumed” as it is returned in a “used” condition – contaminated/radioactive and
WARM which is less habitable for marine life.

Sadly, no doubt reckless men seeking profit will put our futures in greater jeopardy with nuclear reactors.


#111

“Reactor 1, in particular, might have suffered earthquake damage, including the possibility that pipes burst from the shaking, leading to a loss of coolant even before the tsunami hit the plant about 30 minutes after the initial earthquake. It emphasized that a full assessment would require better access to the inner workings of the reactors, which may not be possible for years.”

I would believe those full assessments before listening to what the newspaper states today. I have two problems with these assessments in that they do not make any sense in the context of the hydrogen explosions.

  1. If the majority of plumbing was already damaged, how did the operators send excess hydrogen through chimney lines so that hydrogen filled the upper containment compartments that led to hydrogen explosions at the top of nuclear reactors?

  2. If the steam and coolant pipes were broken, how on earth is it possible for hydrogen to fill lower containment compartments but not explode and then magically travel to the upper containment compartments and then decide to only explode in the upper compartments? That does not make any sense.


#112

I really wish there was some way we could penalize people for making claims such as yourself in the case that you are woefully wrong.

“When in hell are our government planners going to look beyond their noses”
You do realize that the NRC actually makes safety assessments for all nuclear reactors for almost every conceivable disaster, which includes hurricanes. For example the Brunswick Nuclear reactor is already rated to withstand 135-150 mph winds and 22-26 ft. storm surges.

When are anti-nuclear supporters ever going to actually do their research on nuclear energy and nuclear safety?


#113

How about you actually provide some credible source material and explain exactly what I have said that is wrong?

Nobody is denying that Fukushima released radioactive contaminants. I am saying that is inaccurate to claim that Fukushima melted down and broke all of its coolant systems within 30 minutes before the tsunami even hit the nuclear reactors. There are significant problems with first hand information in that employees are talking about events in which they absolutely would not have survived if experienced. Additionally the hydrogen explosions make zero sense in the context of the idea that reactor core pipes were ruptured prior to the tsunami.


#114

How about you READ yourself

And quit ignoring the Sick and Dying

With your Blind Hubris


#115

How about you provide evidence that any of the reactors have suffered contamination and significant damage from Hurricane Florence?


#116

So now that the storm does anyone care to show me how these nuclear plants melted down and made South Carolina unlivable? Can anyone even show me the extreme flood damage caused at these plants?


#117

Care to show me the 6 fukushimas now?


#118