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As DAPL Protesters Brace for Winter, Feds Say No Evictions From Encampment


#1

As DAPL Protesters Brace for Winter, Feds Say No Evictions From Encampment

Andrea Germanos, staff writer

As protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline continue—as well as signs of solidarity—federal officials say they are not going to throw out protesters from an encampment where water protectors are ready to face increasing chilly temperatures to stop the four-state, fossil fuel project.


#2

Along with slavery, genocide of indigenous people is coming back to haunt this settler nation. So ironic that the salvation from fossil fuels destroying life on earth comes from the same people that were pushed out of the way to allow for the exploitation of this land.
The respect for mother nature that the protectors cherish is needed more now than ever.


#3

My wife, who is Native American, and I are so proud of the Lakota Sioux for trying to protect their home from this " black snake ". We cannot be there but we will support, with warm blankets and anything else they need. Please support these brave, albeit non-violent, warriors that are willing spend a cold, North Dakota winter to protect Mother Earth for all of us.


#5

I have gone to the Standing rock website and then written email and phoned. Both email and telephone answering are full. Here's what I want to share with the camp that is too far away to drive to.


Hello and thank you honored protectors,

Check ferrocement.com for bamboo frame structures that are more like the teepee. (Duct tape will hold bamboo framing for at least two winters) (note that a plastic tarp over chicken wire will hold through at least one winter and a summer).

http://ferrocement.com/Shelter-2010/post-1_5-2010.html $9.20 per square foot fiber house and temprary shelter for less than a delivered red cross tent.

http://ferrocement.com/Compost_Toilet/compost-toilet.en.html flycatcher compost toilet and inexpensive upgrade for any pit latrine.

Your struggle is my struggle,

Garrett


#7

I wish it were that easy. But what we need to end fossils before they end us is so complete a turnaround of our economy that it simply cannot be accomplished in time to stop this pipeline. Not to mention that Bakken oil is already in the system, and this is just a new and "less" risky way to ship it.

We do need to make our commitment to the turnaround clear, in just those words. I use almost no plastics that don't get reused directly or recycled, right down to single bottle tops and plugs. I live mostly in my 3/4-below-grade kitchen, so I'm using passive geothermal to heat/cool as much as possible. But I live in a semirural area (little public transit) and am semidisabled, which makes it unworkable for me to even combine trips when I do go out. But if each of us does what they can and is vocal about it, the message will get through in time.


#8

De acuerdo, these brave souls are an inspiration. Their struggle is our struggle, and together we shall triumph!


#9

Send clothes, blankets, socks, boots, head coverings, and money. I also understand that a plan is being made to lay in cords of wood for fire and wood burning stoves...the winter is going to be brutal. Push your local "news" stations to start running the truth about what's going on up there on the reservation and sacred lands. It's extirpate the Indians as much as we can time.....again......

Damn!


#10

The article should have mentioned the history of the outfit that is constructing the pipeline. They have the absolute worst record of any of the pipeline companies in preventing leaks. They have more spills than any other pipeline company, so it is sort of silly to allow someone like that to build a pipeline through such an important area. When, not if, this pipeline springs a major spill into the river, it will end up in New Orleans and the Gulf.

This is what happens when jobs go to the lowest bidder without there being any requirements for competence.