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As Global 1% Seize Economy's Gains, 'Unprecedented Wage Stagnation' for Everyone Else


#61

Interesting stuff on participatory economics. One system that always interested me is that of the Incan Empire. They had no money, no traders and no marketplaces yet were building large scale Public works across their empire. From what is known there was little if any Poverty yet the region they were in was not condusive to large scale agriculture given it was not overly fertile.

The First nations “Gift economy” also thrived for a long period of their history.

Digs in Turkey have turned up a culture that existed for generations in Çatalhöyük wherein there appears to have been no noble or priestly cast and where women and men were seen as equals. The society was eglatarian as far as can be determined.

Reading that article on participatory economics I tend to feel that the Incan model was something like it.

I always read the supporters of the current system claim TINA as if the system called Capitalism as we know it has existed since the dawn of time and no other economic model lasted as long. This simply false as it has really only been around for a few Centuries and in that time has helped to fuel environmental destruction on a scale never seen before. I just can not deem it a success. To me it very much like running up a Credit Card to its max to buy stuff NOW while putting off the payback that needs to happen in the future.


#62

Joan –

Thank you and trust will be helpful for all of us –
I did copy both replies and will hope to read at some point soon.

But I can immediately connect with much of the thinking and hope that we all recognize the destruction of “communities” from earlier times and the control lost and harm done – but which is still happening all over America. One excellent example of this was a town in Boston near BU University (Brookline/Coolidge Corner) which had continued to thrive – the kind of town which those moving to suburbs hope to find. It had wealthy and poor, but once Rent Controls were destroyed so was this community and I imagine many more in Mass.

There were many communities like this in NYC, as well. And I imagine many other states and I think while we may think we know all the ways that these communities have been and can be destroyed, probably wise to find out what Elinor Ostrom found out in her studies of how they were destroyed. The very core of Capitalism, of course, is destruction and moving the assets of the many into the hands of the few by those means.

“The Commons” – not entirely gone, I think – but the concept is rarely discussed or acknowledged.

“Local” and “Public” – the enemy of capitalism and privatization.

Worker owned cooperatives, communities taking over formerly privatized utilities, public banking, financial cooperatives, etc.

About ten years ago they were reporting that something like 50,000 manufacturing plants were no longer in operation. Not sure whether this was due to environmental regulations the owners wanted to escape, or products no longer required – or loss of businesses.

Elin Ostrom … showed how the Commons were successfully managed, for centuries, around the world – but also studied how some were destroyed. Environmental Commons, Knowledge Commons, Institution diversity. COOPERATION

A lot there to think about.

At this point, it seems essential to recreate community and wider community contact – but is everyone ready to think about that and try for it? And can it really be done? We may be finding out soon.

Just want to add to that none of these communities lived with gun violence as we are being encouraged to adapt to today.


#63

You realize that the majority of your “global 1%” are progressives!


#64

As long as those that rule keep an economy running, no matter how meager, we will play along to the end. Just as we did prior to the Great Recession. Did we notice when the arsonists that started the barn on fire were able to keep their matches and their jobs while everyone else had to scratch back to a living.
It’s obvious by now that the power brokers will not trickle a fair living down to the worker bees. We have to take it because as we have seen, even unions can;t help us keep up any longer.
Strike, boycott, burning businesses down, rallying to get progressives in office, and speaking out the truth in the face of Trumpism. G


#65

Capitalism is a system in which the rich have the power to create any new money that is to be created. Thus they perpetuate their power. This will last until the money creation power is taken from them, and from their banks, and money is created openly and democratically, When money is created it should be given in equal measure to all citizens. Money creation by the banks is the essential key that allows the 1% to lock up the control of the 99%.
They call it ‘quantitative easing’. I call it antidemocratic fraud.


#66

Sadly, the more time and money the get the harder it will be to stop them.

I hate to say, “Kill the Fed,” because that’s what Kennedy was going to do, and they stopped him cold.
As long as banksters are able to do anything more than just lend out depositors money we will be in trouble.
How about an amnesty on credit card debt and home mortgages for us?
And a COMPLETE audit of the governments budget, all of it?
We could get a fresh start, and it would make the rich less of a problem. G


#67

Nothing in your comment gives justification for starting a violent revolution.

Here’s the secret of the ages, no government, no matter how brutal, has ever been able to rule without the consent of the people. When there is mass consensus to overthrow a government, it gets overthrown. The reason is because a dictator’s army is part of the people. When the people rise up, the army commits mutiny. Then, violence is minimal and is usually inflicted upon those in power.


#68

Kevin –

I have never recommended anything but non-violent revolution.

Violence only benefits the right wing – fascism.

Here’s the secret of the ages, no government, no matter how brutal, has ever been able to rule without the consent of the people. When there is mass consensus to overthrow a government, it gets overthrown. The reason is because a dictator’s army is part of the people. When the people rise up, the army commits mutiny. Then, violence is minimal and is usually inflicted upon those in power.

The power of the powerless – I agree.
However, as our police enforcement has been militarized, it’s questionable as to whether our population can rely on the “army committing mutiny” – or doing so in a timely manner. ???


#69

Not so, CR4U…

Have you forgotten Gandhi and how intelligent passive resistance ultimately forced the Brits out of India? That wasn’t exactly zero. Recent modern non-violent resistance in various places and countries have achieved their goals; e.g. the suffragettes of early 20th century, for one. Sure, there are those who get nowhere. But, there is only one reactive certainty to violent resistance from the masses - and I don’t need to spell it out, do I? Especially these days of increasingly pervasive police states…