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As Pandemic Rages On, Analysis Finds 1 in 5 People in US Prisons Infected With Covid-19

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/12/18/pandemic-rages-analysis-finds-1-5-people-us-prisons-infected-covid-19

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My neighbor bought a used car in October and still has not received his license plates…guess the prison license plate shops are just one more example of Covid impacts.

My take is that one of the main reasons prisoners are not released is because we have a unique for-profit prison system and these jerks who run them don’t want to lose money. The more prisoners, the more money from the feds.

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From Andrea Germanos’ article:

Over 200 health experts this month said that prison population reductions “would save lives and help limit the spread of the virus to communities nationwide.”

We may never know, with so many causes converging simultaneously – among them: another new strain in the mix, fresh from UK. We know that USA has an exceptional habit of caging humans, for one reason or another – but the keepers of the keys aren’t kept behind those bars, and those bars are no barrier at all to nimble Covid. The ongoing outcome is easy to see and foresee. Covid spreads asymptomatically. Four year old children know this today, but not CA prison administrators, such as Gavin Newsom.

Nobody has explained why California’s outbreak explodes more quickly than than of any other state. You know there are zero ICU beds available in Southern California today? I think we all have prisons and migrant detention centers to thank for this catastrophe – Covid drifting in where it flows like karma. It turns out all the states with the worst outbreaks are chock full o’ jails, but we’re not talking about New Zealand provinces, after all. This is USA: land of shackles.

STATE COVID-19 OUTBREAKS

Ranking is momentum-based on Johns Hopkins’ test-positivity factored with “per-capita newcases” & “immediate mortality” – the ratio of totals on hand for deaths and cases.

>                       JH      per-capita    immed
>                   positivity   newcases   mortality
>                       %           %           %
>  1. Pennsylvania     36.5        68.8        1.64
>  2. Idaho            48.4        76.5        1.15
>  3. Alabama          34.6        63.3        1.02
> --- --------------------- ----------- -----------
>  4. Tennessee        17.5        93.6        1.04
>  5. South Dakota     43.0        92.8        2.57
>  6. Kansas           37.0        81.4        1.48
>  7. California       11.2        66.6        0.54
>  8. Mississippi      22.5        60.9        1.46
>  9. Texas            18.3        48.9        1.18
> 10. Ohio             16.2        80.5        0.78
> 11. Oklahoma         18.5        76.9        0.68
> 12. Nevada           15.9        79.4        1.07
> 13. Arkansas         16.9        66.6        1.56
> 14. Kentucky         14.5        68.1        0.70
> 15. Iowa             36.8        67.4        2.68
> 16. Utah             18.5        86.8        0.49
> 17. New Mexico       12.8        90.0        1.57
> 18. Indiana          12.4        91.2        1.20
> 19. New Hampshire    10.2        49.6        0.69
> 20. Delaware          8.5        69.2        0.58
> 21. Arizona          14.1        75.2        0.93
> 22. Georgia          12.5        46.0        0.89
> 23. Rhode Island      7.3       104.1        1.05
> 24. West Virginia     8.9        63.3        1.49
> --- --------------------- ----------- -----------
> 25. South Carolina   10.2        45.1        1.05
> 26. Missouri         17.2        59.4        1.40
> 27. Wyoming          11.8        86.4        1.34
> 28. Montana          14.0        77.6        1.22
> 29. North Carolina    9.8        46.8        0.86
> 30. Wisconsin        12.7        77.0        1.23
> 31. Louisiana         9.0        52.1        1.17
> 32. Virginia         11.2        36.2        0.82
> 33. Connecticut       6.2        62.3        1.22
> 34. Colorado          9.0        71.2        1.37
> 35. New Jersey        8.2        50.7        1.16
> 36. Massachusetts     5.1        58.6        1.03
> 37. Illinois          9.1        72.0        1.72
> 38. Nebraska         10.4        79.9        1.33
> 39. Alaska            5.7        78.8        0.52
> 40. Minnesota         9.4        83.5        1.25
> 41. Florida           9.0        43.4        0.98
> 42. Michigan         10.1        60.4        1.88
> 43. North Dakota      8.5        90.3        2.06
> 44. New York          4.8        44.3        0.82
> 45. Washington        9.9        31.0        0.71
> 46. Maryland          6.0        41.3        1.40
> 47. Maine             4.5        23.3        1.21
> --- --------------------- ----------- -----------
> 48. D.C.              3.4        31.6        0.99
> 49. Vermont           2.1        16.4        1.64
> --- --------------------- ----------- -----------
> 50. Oregon            5.6        31.7        1.34
> 51. Hawaii            2.5         7.7        1.73
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Yeah, I think you have to look at peer group settings and preexisting conditions that would include hospitals. These have all been responsible for the spread of infection to the larger community. It just so happens to present at a more noticeable level. Also, you have to look at the rate of transfer between settings. By observation, making these type of changes would be of great benefit, that and improved conditions based on responsible planning not just economic models.

Prisoners have been released, I’m not sure how that is working or if it actually reduced risk and have benefitted from getting a stimulus check. Being the little criminals that they are, they are also responsible for some of the fraudulent claims too.

Most of those private prisons have contracts where they get paid either way. In other words, they are paid to provide available space. A few other programs are like that too, but you have to apply for it.

Ruminating
on
the similarity of the cages
that eat

pigs, chicken, children, prisoners,
populations.

FUCK CAGES

In the spring there was news about a slew of prison releases. Much more has been done according to news dated this month.

A quick search shows me that quite a few prisoners have been released, that the Department of Corrections has a website that shows state by state what is happening, and that a federal court has weighed in trying to cut prison populations because of COVID.

Still, of course, the US has too many in jail. And overcrowding is obvious from the high amounts of COVID spread.

~https://www.foxnews.com/us/here-is-how-many-prisoners-have-been-released-covid-19
~https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-08-09/covid-19-california-releases-violent-crime-murder-prisoners
~https://www.prisonpolicy.org/virus/virusresponse.html
~https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/research-reports/reducing-jail-and-prison-populations-during-covid-19-pandemic