Home | About | Donate

As Pandemic Rages, Trump Admin. Approves Tennessee's "Reckless" Plan to Slash Medicaid

And go where? India has more conflict than the US right now.
There are some US states that are fairly solidly Democrat that can provide you more stability. New Mexico for instance. Not perfect, but better than Tennessee.

I said I would leave Tennessee when the time is right (no more social distancing, no more mask wearing), I did not say I would leave the US. India is where my ancestry is from. I do not want to go there, it is very backward and has a lot of turmoil. Modi is like Trump on the Corona Virus, not doing anything to contain it nor working on a cure for it.
According to you, the best place is New Mexico.

1 Like

ALL of them ? That’s a broad brush.

2 Likes

It depends, either way removing Social Security from the economy would be a huge factor in creating instability. (if done by intentional or indirectly by policy) Anyway, if that happens then we are all pretty much in big trouble. Not that we aren’t anyway.

1 Like

Oh. I used to live in the Northeast and sill have family there, I’m well versed in the con of the Donald.

2 Likes

True, mainly because the wounded can’t fight back.

1 Like

Yeah, no kidding. A new age so to speak and always a little disconcerting at first glance. I’m not sure why this isn’t obvious but it is going to be a lot harder for some than others. Mind if I ask what you do for a living or did or what ever you care to share?

1 Like

Ok thanks, I’m always curious in world views. I worked in social services which is or was quite different. It is more like managing resources than creating them. (at least a different level of creativity) You must be fairly young as well. I’m a short timer.

1 Like

I recognize that vernacular, and your “short attitude.” I don’t know if prison inmates use the same turn of phrase as their sentences shorten, but I have known young folks sick of the Army, anxious to get out. I doubt you’re talking about either type of service, though. You usage seems metaphorical. Hmmm.

That cinematic cliché where you see a hyper-condensed version of your life-history playing back with surprising vividness… I keep getting that. At first I found it somewhat spooky, because in the movies it means you’re about to die. But it’s been going on for months now – so my demise is only approximately imminent, I suppose, as usual. I’m finally getting around to reading The Plague by Albert Camus, which doesn’t markedly improve the drain-circling ambience, either.

A brief history of USA COVID-19 cases (latest CDC numbers):

> WEEK    9 WEEKS              CASES
>         ENDING          NEW       TOTAL
> 
>   9.  02/29/2020          24          24
>  18.  05/02/2020   1,122,585   1,122,609
>  27.  07/04/2020   1,719,297   2,841,906
>  36.  09/05/2020   3,384,973   6,226,879
>  45.  11/07/2020   3,581,532   9,808,411
>  54.  01/09/2021  12,293,658  22,102,069
1 Like

Oh, yes it is a commonly used term for when one is not quite finished with something. I reference it in relation to the size of the task and anticipated results, speaking to the ability to effect change. Feeling my age I guess but never actually did time unless you count all the years I worked with institutionalized people but that had more to do with getting them out.

Seeing your life pass before you is real. I almost drowned one time and that happened to me. It was explained to me as when the spirit thinks it is the end of the line, so it is gathering up life experience information. (It doesn’t always mean death, maybe reminiscing) Neurologists think it is the brain doing its own thing. Like most things shades and variations.

Albert Camus is a real challenge for me, but I applaud your bravery. Herman Hess is one I use to like, many of his books are astral explorations of a sort. But the Plague, one of the members of Congress tested positive with the virus in the Capital building and may have exposed a lot of people. It would be so horrifying with the added surreal events of the day.

Take care of yourself, we would miss your well tuned discourse and thank you for the updates.

You really don’t understand, Trump was elected because enough people realized that their government did not work for them and were desperate to try anything. Trump promised he would end the perpetual wars for profit, get rid of disastrous international trade agreements that exported American jobs, and provide healthcare to all Americans. He didn’t accomplish even one of these campaign promises and was opposed by the Democratic party, the political establishment and the media when he announced US troop withdrawals from illegal foreign occupations.

Trump probably lied when he promised all those things in order to get elected in 2016, but the Democrats WON’T EVEN DO THAT. Biden says students should just “give him a break” and stop whining about student debt. Biden says that if the congress were to pass universal, single-payer healthcare he would veto the bill.

The Trump riots may have cost the lives of 5 people, but the recalcitrance of the congress to fix Americans’ healthcare system costs the lives of 40,000 Americans needlessly dying every year because the congress will not fulfill their needs. Plus, they allocate another trillion dollars every year to murder and intimidate foreigners while spying on its own citizens. Trump’s bad, but the rest are barely worth a bucket of spit.

1 Like

Thanks for the information about the Walking Horse. I did a quick search and found a moving article by Pricilla Presley on this practice and the attempts to outlaw them. I hope they are successful.

What about the people to sick or can’t afford to move. We have insanely cruel people in this nation.

1 Like

Hi fern:
Oh my, I was defending Tennessee in the first place, because it seemed so mean of BigB to trash them all. sigh----so the elected ones of Tennessee voted to screw over the people, and 10 other states did the same?
Maybe we should just devolve into city states ike Greece did. And then people would leave those creepy states-----and in order to have a functioning economy, perhaps this would force the elected ones to pay people decent wages,

1 Like

Hi Stardust

Some states have other systems so I would like to hear how they provide medical care, some parts of the country still have public hospitals. In terms of available care I have to wonder about their disabled population. The main issue is that by not participating in Medicaid expansion it changes that provision for others as well.

I have to think there is not much solidarity in that state. Right now I would say addressing pandemic related needs is a tall enough order.

2 Likes

Hi fern:
sigh—I guess I never thought about states being so different. Wow, I am amazed. I grew up in CA, so—yes, I never realized how , not only different, but so substandard states can be. But on, the pandemic,----I’m so glad I left CA in September of 2019 and then in January 2020 Covid19 appeared!
Considering the differences in health care among states —this is why all people in America should have Medicare 4 All.

1 Like

Shame on you. Nobody deserves to be deprived of healthcare in a country as rich as ours. Nobody.

The US healthcare system is not what anybody voted for. It’s been forced on us by commitments which virtually nobody knows about, in a trade agreement.

That changes everything.

1 Like

Hi stardust

I didn’t either for a long time. There are still other provisions that apply but these services have changed over the last 20 or so years. It is more the federal standards that keep people safe and apart from that a state\federal contribution (Medicaid) that covers what other things don’t. The problem with M4A as it currently exists is that it caps Medicaid and changes funding for both Medicare and Medicaid among other things. It wouldn’t necessarily change how states meet their requirements either.

CA is very different but we still have a few public or general hospitals but there are far fewer across the nation. The biggest one is in Los Angeles, and serves a lot of people needing care, it is always on the verge of closing or maybe it already has.

1 Like

That isn’t entirely true, for Medicaid states match federal contributions and they decide how much money is spent and how it is spent. I read that Tennessee was trying to use some of that money to build roads. I’m not certain but I think I read that. Some states just don’t spend money on healthcare. They intentionally voted not to expand Medicaid.

1 Like

proving that they are willing to kill their constituents for a profit(and that the Republicans are a criminal organization posing as a political party) —this is a sign of the evil that infests our system from stem to stern

1 Like