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As Spain Votes, Can Podemos Shine Light Amid Brexit Blackness?


#1

As Spain Votes, Can Podemos Shine Light Amid Brexit Blackness?

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

This post will be updated.

Seeking a spark of light in the darkness that followed this week's Brexit vote, the European left has its attention firmly fixed on the Spanish election Sunday, where a coalition led by the populist Podemos Party could upend the conservative establishment and breath new hope into a continental movement.


#2

For Spain and Europe and the world I hope 'THEY CAN' and will.


#3

What blackness, it was just a confluence of opposite ideologies interests voting against a corrupt government forcing it to look at the reality its ruling class created and to come up with a way to fix it.


#7

Right on! Only, I think it is even more bizarre. It wasn't even nationalism that motivated the anti-EU vote but an admirable desire to to be able to control one's own laws and future - a thing I believe they use to call democracy. Among the anti-EU campaigners was Labour MP George Galloway. The Brexit vote was a great victory for democracy and local control.


#8

US imperialism the BREXIT culprit | Michael Hudson
http://michael-hudson.com/2016/06/us-imperialism-the-brexit-culprit/


#10

Furthermore, the vote is non-binding and could prove to be meaningless. The British people voted overwhelmingly in favor of naming their navy's new research vessel 'Boaty McBoatface,' but the powers that be didn't like that name and unfortunately they will be going with another name instead. Who's to say the same thing won't happen with this result as well? That also demands the question, 'why do they even seek the public's input on anything, anyways?'


#11

The lesson of Podemos for us is that a movement which began as an Occupy style protest in the streets quickly evolved into a major left wing political party.

Can we do that here? We have to organize on ALL levels: electoral, labor, community and street.

We need conferences in every city now about how to bring the various parts of our work together.


#12

Why is Brexit termed "blackness"?

I don't see it as blackness at all.

There is no way on this Earth power & privilege, which includes most well-heeled writers and commenters, will ever figure out what is going on, much less do something about it.

It is "Let them eat cake" syndrome all over again - hierarchy out of touch - as indeed all hierarchies must be - like a law of Nautre.

Truly it has been said:

'Only Nature can qualify a man for knowledge'.

It is why the nomadic tribes living in small groups were egalitarian, or at least as egalitarian as it is possible to be. A matter of intimate and daily contact with the natural world for survival - necessity really is the only really good reason for doing things.

And it is why the most 'in touch' members of 'well-heeled' society' are physical scientists - or at least quite a few of them.

But even they are insulated from the 'madding crowd' - and so really there is only collapse to save us.

And I mean that, for our current course is predictable enough - environmental Armageddon followed and or accompanied by societal collapse, war, possibly nuclear, and descent into a living hell - very possibly resulting in the extinction of our species and and the complete oblivion which extinction implies.

Joseph Tainter pointed out in his book "The Collapse of Complex Societies" that collapse need not signify 'the end', but rather a return to some form of normalcy - a more understandable world at human scale.

If the powers that be in the United States of America are so obtuse as to allow Clinton to run, I sincerely hope that Trump wins and wins big, precipitating an earlier collapse than if the dead as a doornail Democratic Party takes power again.

Your very own nineteenth century jurist Lysander Spooner made the transition from constitutional lawyer to individual anarchist, and this I think is what we all need to become.

As Lincoln pointed out in his First Inaugural Address, if majority rule is not working, only despotism and anarchy remain as alternatives.

I choose anarchy - or perhaps we need another word, as anarchy implies disorder.

I know, lets call it democracy, the Apache way. (see "Life Among the Apache", by John C. Cremony.

   - 30 -

#13

Your missing word might be 'agorism.'


#15

Yes, that kind of political organizing is absolutely necessary. And don't forget that political change goes hand in hand with economic and social change - all three are interconnected and work simultaneously. In other words, we do not need to wait for political change to transform economically and socially - we cannot afford to wait.


#16

I wonder what effect the Brexit had on people's votes - the conservatives seem to have done slightly better than expected while Podemos and the Socialists did slightly worse.


#17

When are leaders of countries going to wise up - when you are about to seriously ruffle the feathers of the powers elite, don't ever get into a helicopter or plane.


#18

PP had increased its lead on last time, taking 137 seats on 33% of the vote. The socialists came second with 85 seats, Unidos Podemos third with 71 seats, and the centrist Ciudadanos party fourth with 32.


#19

Little by little, bit by bit, the center collapses and the left, left-center duke it out on policy and programs. With a robust conservative minority to rebut and analyze gov't overreach. This is what Kennedy and FDR, disciples of a wise progressive federalism, envisioned. Coupled to a conservative ( non-militaristic and non-interventionist ) foreign policy is the correct approach for the U.S. and we'd be wise to understand the best minds of a modern Spain, in these matters. Multi-party countries seem to understand the inherent tensions informed citizens face today. American tastes run to only money and cheap political spectacles. Another example of how tawdry our country is.


#20

Perfectly put.

Remember that in the '30's FDR was pushed to the left by the the organizing drive of the CIO, and by co-op and anti-eviction organizing.

We need all of that and more, and we need conferences in every city to talk about how.


#24

Really? WW1, WW2? Also, the living standard, of most Europeans has improved vastly since the EU was founded.

It is pretty rich, a USAn from a country that is practically third-world compared to Europe, commenting about the Deficiencies of Europe. Please refrain from commenting on the EU and Berxit from your insular US point of view (do you even have a passport?) until you learn more about Europe.


#25

Quite possibly. I've been taken aback by the wrath he's endured over this. Seems disproportionate to the situation.


#27

Thanks for the update, CD. Disappointing results. The rebellion in Spain will apparently have to wait some more. But at least the reactionaries haven't taken power outright again, so there's that. It seems that the problem is more the same old stink of the long-ago-sold-out "Socialist" parties that are preventing the rise of a more truly leftist political movement.


#28

So being a tourist and having a passport is now the basis for expertise?
I'm past tired of your pathetic schtick, Yunzer, you fraud.
Your arguments--which are more appropriately labelled tantrums--continue to assert as fact whatever opinion jumps out of your coffee cup at any given time.
I have ten years of residency in Europe. You? I thought so.
Europe's standard of living is directly tied to its latent social democratic institutions--you know, the ones in existence PRIOR to Brussels assuming the throne. The same mechanisms being eroded and attacked slowly in the more affluent countries, where workers are going backwards. It's an admittedly slow slide, but it is a slide. I mean, I'm glad you enjoy your time at the continent's Marriots and all, but that's not a basis for declaring yourself expert at crap.
You study rocks or chemicals or some crap like that. You have no training or expertise in politics, sociology, or history, yet you're convinced that your opinions are infallible.
They're not. They're generally boring and derivative from establishment press.

Your entire view of the EU 'experience' is a bourgeois tapestry from the eyes of a comfortable professional class American, which makes it no surprise that you would be jumping down the throats of the dirty peasants. Again.

The EU's standards are declining in several countries. FOR WORKERS, not for your kind, obviously. Hence the rebellion in the first place. Tell working class Greeks their standards of living are improving under EU rule. Tell the working class Spaniards and French, Dutch and Danish, all of whom want out. The only people crying in their lattes are the yuppies who might lose some of the perks of professional mobility.

It's beyond comprehension that you could correctly ascribe financier motivation and influence on American life, but utterly ignore that same dynamic when it's happening in Europe.

I love Europe. Unlike you, I lived there for a large chunk of my life. I worked there. My family is from there. But the Europe of your brochures and your tours or business trips is only a reality for some. The promise that began brightly has been slowly draining away for years. You call yourself a leftist, yet you mourn most of all for the affects on your fellow professionals and heap scorn on the people you pretend to champion.

Decide who you are. And we're not speaking again. You are still the same jerk you used to be; the guy who blows up over any disagreement because he can never, ever get anything wrong. Now do what you do best and cry to the mods and flag me. You might get lucky again.