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As Trump Hits a New Low, Here’s How We Go High


#1

As Trump Hits a New Low, Here’s How We Go High

Isaiah Poole

It has, today, come to this: The person holding the title of president of the United States in 2017 decries the loss of “beautiful statues and monuments” to white supremacy, “sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart.”

This is a new low for a presidency that is remarkable in its ability to sink to new levels of moral and intellectual depravity.

"Trump has unapologetically poured fuel on the fires of racial hate."


#2

So true - mindless reaction to mindless reaction =mindlessness. That is the equivalent of rendering oneself food for a parasite.

I have found myself confounded by the incoherence of this cadre administration- that is until I stepped back and asked myself: What do these have in common? I propose but one aspect that might be called a ‘political BOT’ based on, what else, like the bannon, pumping what seems otherwise to be an unidentifiable wave of hate feeding on hate.
I would submit that this cadre is attempting to - along with “leaders” in various places all over the world, to create a ‘history’ that coincides with and reinforces ALL of the false narratives of colonization: the dehumanization, claims of race supremacy, divine right to resources, control of modes of " exchange", virtual enslavement among the other methodologies.

Look at ALEC, the Wisconsin debacle under Walker and ask what these share… might it be a Koch bot?


#3

I’m not sure how you define or create the “unity” that Poole calls for, except that I’m seeing it in the quiet or noisy removal of Confederate monuments. Charlottesville, intended to provoke race war, instead has brought us to another tipping point, where those monuments have become as embarrassing as the battle flag.

I’ve just posted a meme that uses the “ripping apart” quote and asks “Wasn’t that the point?”


#4

This is the true radicalism, as King saw it: not just a rejection of the systems of oppression and the values upon which they are built, but a repudiation of the tools the keepers of this system use to gain and maintain power.

That is the best justification for non-violence I know, and there are, of course, others.

Yet, when Hitler’s Storm Troopers rounded up “undesirables” including Jews and shipped them off to the ovens, I think I would have committed violence in response, had I known what they were doing. I am glad America joined the Allies to defeat Germany. There is a point where non-violence does not stop violence – it may only work if there is a conscience in the violent, such as when a people are fighting among themselves.


#5

Exactly the point, and there’s less excuse for such ignorance today. We must intervene while nonviolence is still possible, and while the atrocities are contained in another sovereign nation. The error in the 1930s was that we waited until the Nazis invaded “our” countries, until Japan attacked our territory.


#6

Agreed. We should probably always offer non-violence in the beginning, and only respond violently ourselves if that doesn’t work. I do think non-violence is more likely to work to dissipate violence if the people actually have common grounds and are not totally depraved with no conscience, as Hitler’s Storm Troopers were.


#7

If we write anyone off as inhuman, we’re as bad as they are. Hope lies in appealing human to human.


#8

bks,

Hope, maybe, but I’m sure the Jews in Poland had hope they wouldn’t be murdered.


#9

Bannon out. Now for the rest of the piles of shit💩that inhabit our White House… Not one at a time. Three quarters out now!


#10

The opposite of hope is fear. The great nonviolent leaders didn’t fear death.


#11

Not sure what your last line meant, but there is an inflection point here that needs to be looked at honestly.

I’m guessing that many people of good conscience have pondered the meaning and effect of these monuments, at least in the last week or so. My own thoughts have some added nuance today. The recent pointing out that many of them were erected during Jim Crow and the rise of the Klan, alongside the historical awareness that the losing side suffered as great a loss of life, of fathers, sons, and brothers as did the Union. Many of the north did not fight for emancipation or equal rights and treatment of “the negro,” and many of the south did not fight for slavery. It is not out of the question that 60 years later that at least some of the desire to commemorate was just for the loss of their presence, and not so much of their cause. Yet another reason that war is the summation of all evils and must be avoided at all costs, because this one so distant and without living participants today, continues to vex us.

Recall that Lincoln counseled Grant and Sherman, as the end came into view to “Let 'em up easy.” This was not a backhanded endorsement of slavery or winking acceptance of the justness of the secessionists cause. It was the acknowledgement of their great loss, and the need to heal.

I myself would see all memorials that would legitimize the cause of the secessionists removed. But I am not a son of the south, and can’t personally feel that it is the very memory of my ancestors lives that is being delegitimized, and not just the cause that brought them to their end.


#12

Think, though, how you might feel if you were “JustaBlackman,” that the memory of your ancestors is delegitimized by the presence of those monuments, rather than their removal.

My maiden name, Kellam, which I still incorporate in my legal surname, is somewhat rare where we got it (Indiana) but all over the DelMarVa peninsula and, as my Dad discovered when he traveled in the days of paper phone books, most common otherwise in Black neighborhoods. Though my ancestors who went to Indiana were Quakers, and we like to think part of the reason they left DelMarVa was opposition to slavery, I have that very obvious name connection to people who are probably descended from the chattel of some of my ancestors. I bear that shameful label, which may speak more loudly to a Kellam (Kellum, Kellem) of color than anything I can say about what I’ve done to break my racist assumptions and ‘rip apart the culture and history’ of racism in my society. I can’t show that my Kellam grandfather married the daughter of a Union captain. All that is obvious is my connection to slavery.

And there’s the other thing: The memorials are to “secessionists,” those who strove to disUnite the States. It’s time we let that division scab over and put our energies into some of the other difficulties that confront us 150 years later.


#13

My screen name isn’t Justawhiteman, and of course I understand what this represents to blacks. That’s not the element of our national convulsion I was trying to corner. This isn’t the first time you’ve responded in a patronizing manner to a comment of mine pertaining to race. Why do you do that?

I’ll take another run at what I was trying to get at. Yes, they should all come down. Secessionism in the cause of enslavement should not be celebrated or memorialized. But there will be consequences, probably hidden and festering. Let’s do it as a committee organizing a final internment, and not as a mob.

This screen name is a pseudo proper name I coined for an entirely different purpose, and since I wasn’t using it for that purpose I decided to use it here. If it has any significance at all it is Red Green’s meaning: “I’m an man, I can change, if I have to, I guess.” I’ve often considered changing it to Roy Baty, or even Boffo the Clown.


#14

Definitely nonviolence. Using violence just plays into the hands of the white supremacists. They want to be seen as victims of society. That is how they get recruits probably, posing as victims and seeking people to help their cause. I think we need to be very concerned about this anti-fas group that seems determined to use violence to stop these white supremacists. I think this is counterproductive. One thing that has worked recently in some German towns is making fun of the marching Nazis rather than taking them seriously which is what they want. However, Germany does not have these open-carry laws so the Nazis were not marching carrying guns. These open-carry laws should be of real concern. Neo-Nazis marching down streets carrying rifles is a whole different ballgame. That makes them very dangerous and you really have to take them seriously. The ACLU says it will not work to protect free speech of people carrying guns. This mixture of the US gun culture and neo-Nazis, KKK, skinheads, etc is really alarming. This is gong to be very challenging for the police.


#15

Bannon resigned. One for our side. This does not mean Bannon will not be indicted. Meanwhile the Supremes who made corporations into people so they can buy our representative republic’s elections have punched Gorsuch’s ticket to perform at the Trump Hotel, headliner, a Supreme. Mel Brooks should still be alive parody the insanity of American politics. Nazis and evil have always been with us. Lead America toward the light liberals. The terrified may not be convinced but they can be led.


#16

I’m not so certain dis-uniting the USA isn’t a bad idea.

The civil war never ended. We just square off in different ways now.

On the other hand, I’ve lived in 6 states and the true representations of our cultural heritage–fast food, strip malls, houses of worship, segregation, general fear and loathing–are omni-present.


#17

This is, sadly, so true.


#18

dr. king was greatly influenced by mahatma gandhi’s satyagarah movement in the fight for india’s independence from british imperialist rule.
the term has been translated as non-violence, but it goes beyond that.
the actual meaning of satyagarah is obstinate truth. this was the core of the movement in india.
it is an active form of non-violent resistance and essential to this is the speaking of
"obstinate truth"
i am proud to be a citizen of canada, an immigrant from india.
peace.


#19

[quote=“Annie12, post:4, topic:44211”]
when Hitler’s Storm Troopers rounded up “undesirables” including Jews and shipped them off to the ovens,[/quote]
Read some history on how Germany was left after WWI, not the ‘how the US came to save the world’ nonsense. Why Hitler made the cover of Time, why Churchill lauded Hitler and said that if ever Britain was defeated he hoped that they would find somebody as competent as Hitler to help them rebuild.

Nor was anybody ‘shipped off t the ovens’, whatever the truth of the matter, nobody who is credible has ever suggested that Jews, or anybody else, was killed in ‘ovens’.


#20

We knew the Japanese were coming. We watched them approach. We were frothing at the mouth to use our fancy new bombs. Another myth to expose.