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Beneath Dramatic G20 Clashes, a Deep Demand for a Better World


#1

Beneath Dramatic G20 Clashes, a Deep Demand for a Better World

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

With the focus on dramatic images of German riot police using tear gas and high-powered water cannons to disperse G20 protesters in Hamburg on Thursday, the message from those demonstrating in the streets was clear for those willing to listen: a better world is possible.


#2

Hamburg is very much akin to Portland, Oregon. Both sit on major inland river ways that serve as major ports. The Elbe and the Columbia rivers, both run about 60 miles to the sea, the North Sea and the Pacific Ocean, respectively. To have the G-20 corporate, neoliberal meeting here is reminiscent of Seattle protests in many ways. Both large cities, wealthy cities and liberal-leaning, politically. This choice of a city that is easy for protesters to get to will be quite a refreshing transparency to see the will of We the People on display. "Can we just get along?"- Rodney King, after the 1992 LA riots. Bernie? Jill? 2020?


#3

Maybe we are learning that politicians and the wealthy are not all that smart, after all. The money, fame and glory crowd are just symptoms of a world gone bad - cunning, focused, ruthless - yes. But smart - no.

Stupid is as stupid does - Forrest Gump.

As we are all heading off a cliff, the Davos bunch has little to offer I think.

Ray Kurzweil contends, I believe, that the purpose of the brain is to anticipate the future.

The next election or quarterly report is not what we need to be thinking about, as our very own Greenhouse Mass Extinction Event unfolds.


#4

To any who, like myself, hear donald trump project the undermining of Ukraine by the mafia of the ilk of Victoria Nuland as a 'destabilizing' by russia - I invite keeping on file this little tidbit

and this:


to which the refrain comes to mind: '... oh the candyman can...'

#5

I want more free stuff!


#6

Apparently after one day of protesting pretty much all the protesters went home. So much for the "resistance" huh.


#7

Boycott. They can't turn their weapons on those who boycott.


#8

They don't jail you for not buying their stuff...yet...except maybe Monsanto ...and anyone who violates the international corporate trade deals...oh wait...I think I should quit while I'm ahead...Boycotts will become their next targets! Yikes!


#9

Is that you corporate "citizen"? Is that you, the 1%, looking for the next meal at the government trough?


#10

Nice. They really are gluttonous pigs at the corrupt government trough, taking our culture's social benefits to obnoxious excess while working incessantly to deny others fair and equitable opportunity (method: they purchase political influence, make laws that exclude but a few--democratic selfishism as opposed to democratic socialism). Needy bunch of bastards they.


#11

Credexit. Stop borrowing from them. Cut up your credit cards. Use cash only. Stop patronizing corporate businesses. Shop local, keep your money local. Start a garden. Reuse, repurpose, repair, recycle, or at least REDUCE your consumption.
Join a credit union, hell, join a labor union.


#12

For a better world:

WHAT THE HEALTH?


#13

You're a meat puppet. Read the article, even? What did you expect, open gunfire in the streets? The German security forces were prepared and they simply corralled the marchers. There were children in the marches; please, it was a draw at worst.

Are you listening to the NRA's commercials and Trump supported appeals for real weaponized politics? They're the crazies; let the police figure out if they want to shoot unarmed children and whole families marching on the streets, or deal with armed to-the-teeth, white angry males looking to keep America a racist and hollow shell of a country.
Boycotting hasn't even been publicized; what are we boycotting, again?


#14

What breaks my heart is that the world's young along with older adults who have so much to lose are risking their lives and well-being to protest the cruel, inhumane practices of the powers-that-be, oligarchs, tyrants, etc. They should be looking forward to everyday and their futures rather than having to fight to stay alive and make a living/find affordable housing day-in and day-out...and fearing for their futures.

Where is the loving-kindness, altruism, communal caring?

So very sad...me pongo muy triste y desolado....:cry:


#15

All the while the American Catholic hierarchy praises the troops for their service. Killing around the world for the oligarchy. And they preach, the Peace of Christ in church. Kafkaesque !


#16

I'm down with it all except for the credit card part. Taking on debt to build assets is a good thing, as long as you are able to pay it down quickly and look for opportune moments like 1 year interest free offers. We built a 4 car garage with sweat equity by charging materials to credit cards. When the interest-free term was nearing its end, there was always another 1 year interest free offer from another bank. Granted we had to buckle down to pay the bill off in 3 years, but the cost of using their money for those years cost us nothing because we always made a larger than required payment when due, until it was paid off.

The interest free offers are not as common as they once were, but now there are myriad cards that pay you back based on the amount of your purchases. Get one of those and pay for everything you possibly can by credit card, but (and this is the important part) do not carry a balance. Pay it off in its entirety every month. This costs the banks money in administration and actual dollars with the pay back feature. (I got back nearly $900 last year on my credit card account by charging my mortgage, insurance, and utility payments, along with groceries, gas, clothing, travel and incidentals.)

For those people fortunate enough to be able to do this, do it now! I realize there are far too many people who are unable to pay off their cards for economic reasons beyond their control. That's called capitalism in a neo-liberalism framework, and it's why I'm really happy to see the streets of Hamburg alive with resistance.


#18

PROTESTERS ALSO NEED TO ORGANIZE THE CITY THEY'RE IN.

"Even if there are 150,000 people in the streets, this massive mobilization won't produce any concrete change."

That's pretty obvious. So what do you do? Well, if you have 150,000 protesters, at least half of them should be trained to CANVASS THE CITY. Some on downtown street corners, some at farmer's markets (the best) at concerts, festivals & other events, and some door to door in working class neighborhoods.

Here's what can be accomplished.
1) We can PERSONALLY invite average city dwellers to come down to the main demo.
2) Also personally, we can inform people of the ISSUES, which they won't get much over the mass media.
3) We can look for LOCAL LEADERS who may want to help organize their neighborhoods, workplaces or schools.
4) The protesters who go out canvassing will be building up EXPERIENCE which they can bring home to our own cities, and to the next demo.

Sure, a new world is possible. But only if we begin to develop new ways of protesting and organizing. Bringing together large masses in the hope of impressing TV audiences isn't doing it. We need to expand our person to person networks.


#19

Oxfam says wealth of richest 1% equal to other 99%


Who are they? How do we hold them accountable? How can you have a free market we say 10 companies control 90% of the food you eat? How can you have a democracy when so few control all the wealth and pay no taxes and are beyond the law?


#20

Meanwhile, in the US the Democratic party, the erstwhile party of opposition, is actively promoting the maintenance of the neoliberal status quo while actively repressing the emergence of any vision of the future that does not maintain the position of the big Wall Street donors.

Amerikkka: Welcome2Hell.