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Bernie Sanders: Strong Words on Structural Racism and Inequality


#1

Bernie Sanders: Strong Words on Structural Racism and Inequality

Terrance Heath

The stakes were high for the speech by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) to the national gathering of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Baton Rouge, Louisiana on Saturday night. Sanders’ speech to the civil rights organization, whose first president was Rev.


#2

What's Sanders position on the human rights of the Palestinians, who Sanders' sponsor Israel treats with brutality and oppression?

What's Sanders position on the human rights of Muslims in Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, Libya, and other countries where the USA wages its brutal wars of aggression? Would Sanders be able to tell his sponsors at the Pentagon that enough is enough, time to come home from the battle?


#4

Whew... I knew, hoped, prayed he would stand up on the humans rights and freedom from opression side of this.


#5

Addressing Empire at home is huge step in the right direction. I've posted many criticisms of Sander's support for the F35 and I think such criticisms are valid. I also have come to the conclusion that Bernie Sanders is right now the only practical hope whatsoever to chip away at what is already an entrenched duopoly, oligarchy, rule of billionaire sociopaths et al.


#8

Please don't generalize about Progressives. Speaking for myself, am not blind to the different candidate's positions and past mistakes.


#11

Johnny, given all that I have written on each point you are making, I'm the last person that needs that lecture.

His support for the F35 and all of the rest, you will find no argument with me. I also currently do not trust that Sanders is in it for the win, and have stated this before.

That said, he can't possibly be making much of the oligarchy happy with singling out the "billionaire class", his repeated calls for a single payer system, and now his taking up the cause of the militarization of police and especially his clear language aligning himself with the BLM movement.

I may be compromising my core principles in supporting Bernie Sanders at this point, but there is no chance in hell that any of this message would make it into the MSM at this point otherwise.

My hope ( give me a break on the use of that word will you?) is that enough of the message gets through the MSM to inspire more and more people to show up at his events. Stadium size events such that there is SOME F'NG MOVEMENT among the masses compromised as much of the masses are.

There has to be room for some kind of forgiveness of others' blind spots that have been manufactured "blind spots" to the extent there is some movement toward a shared understanding that US citizens have to take care of each other in a growing awareness of single payer, policing reforms, and the rest.

I'm not naive. I'm quite aware this is a shred of a glimmer of hope. I'm fully aware of the Deep State, and how one person as President is unlikely to make much of a change.

I'm hoping, yes HOPING for some kind of spark that might even surprise Bernie Sanders.

I'm hoping that he ultimately is just a tool of the people to be discarded if need be.


#13

I won't care if Sanders endorses HRC in the general election, except of course for the implication, which is that he will not have won the Democratic nomination himself.

I don't see any reason to sweat this; the algorithm is simple:

  1. vote for Sanders in the Dem primary
  2. if HRC wins the primary, vote Green or Socialist in the general election
  3. if Sanders wins the primary, then you may consider voting for him in the general election if you believe there's a substantial difference between him and whoever is the Republican candidate (different people will have different feelings about this). If you believe there is no substantial difference, then vote Green or Socialist.
  4. immediately following the election, and regardless of who wins, resume your struggle for the revolution.

#15

Abe Lincoln felt the same way you do. He thought it was much more important to bring the Confederate states back into the Union than it was to end slavery.


#18

i'm hoping that as a tool of the people he wins. :O)


#19

I think we're at a point in our history where we're not sure of what we're talking about. This can be especially useful for politicians. Sen. Sanders opposes inequality. OK, who says they support it? More importantly, which inequality does Sen. Sanders oppose? Racial? What would he change, to reduce racial inequality? Can there be racial equality without a measure of economic equality -- at least, ensuring that people have the means to get back on their feet and work their way up? Up until recent years, "inequality" also focused on economic/class issues. Sen. Sanders used to speak out powerfully about US poverty, then dropped the issue to focus on the gap between the better-off and the well-off. Sen. Sanders knows (and used to talk about) that it's impossible to save/rebuild the middle class without shoring up the poor. Today's Dem pols lack the courage to address US poverty (beyond the trickle-down agenda). In reality, not everyone can work, and there aren't jobs for all. We shipped out a HUGE number of jobs since the 1980s, ended actual welfare in the 1990s. No pol will legitimately address our poverty crisis. It defies logic to say you oppose inequality while implicitly supporting it.


#20

This is still the pre-game entertainment. The VP usually goes on the run for president, and Joe Biden will be launching his campaign in early 2016. Any Dem can challenge him for the nomination, and the primaries will determine which one goes on to run in 2016.

As for Sen. Sanders endorsing Clinton, I think it matters a lot, since it reflects his actual views/potential agenda. He is a well-seasoned speaker who can rally a crowd, but the devil's in the details. Quite a switch -- a one-time Socialist endorsing a neoliberal. Complex issue, but based on our own history, I understand why our our poverty crisis is a critical issue. The last I checked the Green Party platform, they had dropped this issue to focus on the middle class. America's Socialist Party is strictly for the employed. We need a leader who has the courage to recognize how gravely our economic system was damaged since the 1980s -- the jobs are gone, and people can't eat trickle-down economics.

Final point: If we had a revolution today, who would fight whom? We're deeply divided and subdivided by class and race. Overall, the US is at a point where the rich are now doing to the middle class what the middle class already did to the poor.


#21

Though Lincoln would accept a Union even if it was half-slave, half-free, if we study this man's attitude towards slavery, we could surmise that he felt it would be, ultimately, easier to end slavery in all parts of the Union only if the Confederated states remain in the Union. If the South had achieved secession, slavery might've had remained in most areas of the north American continent for many more decades, if not longer.


#22

'Saying, “enough is enough,” and “creating a political revolution from the ground up” is what Black Lives Matter activists are doing.'

Well, yes, but kicking your allies or potential allies in the teeth with an ambush is not exactly helping 'create a political revolution from the ground up' so much as it makes everyone who notices find less reasons to trust you and your intentions.

We must never welcome violent misbehavior disrupting the very most civil discourse we have! There is no excuse for that ill-considered behavior, and over-looking it or pandering to it is also irresponsible.


#23

Bull shit. The Middle Class didn't do anything to the poor. You live in a nation that is based on aristocratic families and hegemonic concentrations of wealth, and THAT wealth purchases politicians and with them, policies. To insert the Middle Class into the narrative--as Talking Point used by you and a few of your tag team buddies--comes straight out of Frank Luntz. It's also hilarious for you to pretend to decry class interests when you yourself posit this ridiculous (and divisive) meme.


#24

Violent misbehavior? What that Bernie Sanders was interrupted? He is a professional politician last time I checked. It goes with the territory and he has handled it quite well.

Sure there is an excuse for such aggressive acting up IN A POLITICAL FORUM. The "excuse" is derived from the absolutely rational sense of urgency BLM movement has for getting as much attention as possible as it is a life or death situation for so many blacks each and every day for just wearing their skin color while going about their life.


#25

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#26

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#28

Their statement on economic justice struck me as pie in the sky wonderful if you can get it. I favor strictly chaperoned single sex schools from shortly before puberty until either the students can get private sector jobs that pay enough to live on, or more likely, need to be transferred to halfway houses where they can live still well-chaperoned and be bused five days a week to minimum wage jobs with 1/3 of take home pay to pay for room, 13 for board, and 1/3 to first pay off any debts then save up for a nest egg, either when they get promoted to a job that pays enough to live on, or they reach retirement age, when they can continue to live there but do whatever useful work they are still able to do at the halfway house, until or unless they get so disabled they have to be transferred to a nursing home. Nobody should be considered breeding stock, until they can support themselves with a private sector job. .


#29

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