Home | About | Donate

Big Oil Faces Historic Human Rights Inquiry for 'Complicity in Climate Change'


#1


#2

QUOTE: Whether the plaintiffs win their case or receive compensation... UNQUOTE
The term 'plaintiff', if used judiciously, suggests to me as a layman, that the complaint has already been filed or is about to be filed in some court. The article has not divulged, which court. I believe, that the location and jurisdiction of the court would be of primary importance.


#3

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#4

It matters not the outcome of such a lawsuit.What matters is the doing. Making the oil companies justify profiteering is a step in the right direction. Telling the human story of watching the floating dead and being incapacitated by flood waters is a consequence of our addiction to oil. Addiction and death, violation of human rights, uncontrolled environmental disasters are connected to Big Business. Shedding light on how frequently this occurs is an issue of justice.


#5

Massive natural gas storage leak alarms California residents, climate activists

It’s the climate equivalent of the BP disaster in the Gulf of Mexico: the rupture of a natural gas storage site in California that is spewing vast amounts of methane into the atmosphere and is likely to go unchecked for three months.

The breach of the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage site, near Porter Ranch has forced the relocation of hundreds of families, who complained of headaches, nosebleeds and nausea from the rotten-egg smell of the odorant added to the gas to aid in leak detection.

The leak, which was detected on 23 October, now accounts for at least a quarter of California’s emissions of methane – a far more powerful climate-altering gas than carbon dioxide.

Already, the ruptured storage facility has released well over the equivalent of 800,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide – about the same amount that would be generated by driving 160,000 cars for a year, according to the California Air Resources Board. ..

The California breach has caused no serious injury so far, but it is already having a marked global warming effect, campaign groups said.

Melissa Bailey, a spokeswoman for the company, said on Friday it could take three or four months to plug the leak. “This is a very unique leak,” she said. “All of our attempts to kill the well haven’t worked.” She said crews had made six attempts to stop the release of methane by pumping fluid into the storage well, which extends to a depth of 8,500ft. She said the relief well was assured of success.

“These types of wells are a proven approach to shutting down oil and gas wells. Once cement is pumped in, the gas reservoir is cut off from the leaking well and gas can no longer escape. The new well will not be placed into storage operations. It will only be an observation well to monitor the storage reservoir,” Bailey wrote in an email.

However, plugging the well won’t be quick. “The relief well process will probably take three or four months to complete. It takes that long because it essentially involves steering a tool to find a seven-inch pipe, more than a thousand feet away, thousands of feet below ground. Magnetics are used to locate the leaking well,” Bailey said.


#6

Correction. The Philippines are not a cluster of "low-lying" islands. Some are quite mountainous. However, a great many people live at sea-level.

This is an interesting issue. WE have had a choice whether or not to use petroleum products, and WE have fully accepted their use. The Philippines are grossly overpopulated, and hence when typhoons strike a great many die and when sea-level rises a great many will be displaced. For that one can blame the Catholic Church, which has imposed its ruling against contraception across the vast Catholic community, as well as the corrupt political system that has kept a great many Philippinos in unremitting poverty.

By all means indict the oil companies for refusing to recognise anthropogenic global heating, but they are not solely responsible for this mess.


#7

Hopefully, our children and grandchildren won't spoil the holidays by asking what we are doing to save their planet.


#8

Wow. But what could possibly go wrong?


#9

"This is yet another indication that we are seeing the end of the fossil fuel era."

i'm awaiting the sudden drop in demand, as USans begin to recognize that 2 + 2 = 4, and reduce their automobile use. One month or another, this shift will begin.


#10

If CEOs of Dirty Oil Corporations are going on trial for their human rights abuses, then I trust we need to see a whole lot of ministers, presidents, and other political leaders accused of human rights violations as well. The Dirty Oil Corporation can only thrive due to the assistance they so generously receive from governments worldwide; governments even spend tax payers money to subsidies these dirty activities.


#11

Once the TPP etc. are rammed up our collective asses, none of this will matter any more. Massive oil spill? No sweat to Exxon as the cost of cleanup will be laid on the backs of taxpayers. Human rights abuses? If compliance with law means lower expected profits (i.e. whatever the corp decides is the right, huge number), the taxpayers make up the difference. Climate change and ecological destruction? Hello taxpayers once again (if there will be any taxpayers left as our bleak corporate future proceeds to our extinction). Any jurisdiction from which any law proceeds to regulate corporate behavior (which means everywhere) will be rendered irrelevant. There will be no control whatsoever. Lawmaking as community control over corporate wrongdoing will be obsolete. Koyaanisqatsi.


#12

Yeah, that "cluster of low lying islands" remark stuck out to me too. Pretty ironic that a Brit had to correct a USAn about the geography of one of the US's former colonies. And aside from being not-so-low-lying, to call such large islands as the Philippines a "cluster" (Is Japan, or even the UK, a "cluster of islands"?) calls into question whether Ms. Prupis can even find the Philippines on a map!

USAns are not known for their geographical literacy. I will never forget how the first birthday gift from an Australian girlfriend of mine, when I was younger and a typical geographically illiterate USan myself, was a big atlas!. But in this age of "Google Earth", geographical illiteracy becomes especially inexcusable.


#13

Thanks, I had no idea that was still leaking....


#14

Ha!! Good point.........


#15

With gasoline prices on the verge of falling below $2.00 a gallon, and some college kids in the bar district openly ridiculing my scooter last night when I told them it is battery electric, and the incredible traffic everywhere today, I really don't see any such trends. And they will love the way winter this year seems to be on track to resemble a southern California winter...