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Big Wine Fails to Dry Farm During California's Relentless Drought


#1

Big Wine Fails to Dry Farm During California's Relentless Drought

Shepherd Bliss

California Governor Jerry Brown spent this year’s Earth Day at the elite Iron Horse Winery in the Sebastopol countryside. It was a great photo opportunity and promotion for the winery. Iron Horse is known for donations to President Bill Clinton and other politicians, with whom it has cozy relationships, and from whom it receives favors, such as these visits. I operate a small berry and apple farm nearby and teach sustainable agriculture, mainly to college students.


#2

I just love it when the powers that be tell us to conserve water while simultaneously doing EVERYTHING they can do accommodate land "development".


#3

Very nice informative article Mr. Bliss. "... If grapes can’t grow in non-irrigated areas, they shouldn’t be planted there.” As humanity increases, a general mandate may emerge - crops that can't be grown in arid regions will not be grown there with pumped groundwater.


#4

Thank you for the informative article. I love it when people fit their names--Shepherd Bliss--truly born to the calling of sacred stewardship.


#5

If grapes can’t grow in non-irrigated areas, they shouldn’t be planted there.”

Yep and this applies to most everything. Understand nature and work with nature. Do not try and recreate it in mans image.


#6

Indeed. One gallon of water for one almond (66% of this crop is exported). Close to five for one walnut.
But let's pretend there's not an historic drought, and just keep right on burying ourselves. This is the implicit message from Jerry Brown.
Not to mention: Uber rogue corporation Nestle' pays the state $.65 for every 450 gallons of water it takes from California.
Gosh, I'd like to have that rate, too.


#8

I didn't really understand that, since it would be backwards to most cautionary labeling. It seems to me that it would be better to label wines with the amount of water used, e.g. "this vineyard used [amount] of extra water to produce this wine". Or just ban irrigation of vineyards all together.

Wines from the Moselgebiet (formerly Mosel-Saar-Ruwer) in western Germany are sumptuous, much more delicious (to me, anyway) than the wine the Rheingebiet produces from the same Riesling grape. As far as I know, the Moselgebiet vineyards never use supplementary water.