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Boeing’s Homicides Will Give Way to Safety Reforms if Flyers Organize

Boeing’s Homicides Will Give Way to Safety Reforms if Flyers Organize

Ralph Nader

To understand the enormity of the Boeing 737 Max 8 crashes (Lion Air 610 and Ethiopian Airlines 302) that took a combined total of 346 lives, it is useful to look at past events and anticipate future possible problems.

Flying blind(ed by greed)

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I guess Boeing is not interested in safety–and the FAA lets Boeing do a lot of their own testing—hmmm—that’s scary. It’s all about the Benjamins, isn’t it, Boeing : (

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Let’s just leave it all up to the regulators appointed by our elected president - Donald J.Trump. Does anyone feel safer now? Would you put your children on a plane fully approved by one of the political sycophants Trump has packed the regulatory agencies with.?

Their CEO probably has his own corporate jet and it is not a B737 MAX.

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HI reader 21, and oh yes, the American versions will have all the NECESSARY software. The latest reports show that the Lion Air and the Ethiopian airlines pilots did nothing wrong----it was the software Boeing----the U flights have all the extras, Boeing- ( supposedly) —maybe it’s time for corporate people who so worship money and power—maybe it’s time Boeing for some jail time----where you will have time to think over just what you have become----soulless. : (

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April 5, see today’s Democracy Now! The entire show was about Boeing, including an interview with Ralph Nader.
Again, Thank you Amy Goodman.

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Jail time - yes, yes!!!

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This plane is safe.
It is so safe, Boeing should donate one to be used as Air Force One.
Okay Donald: Do you support unbridled corporate greed or not?
We dare you.

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"This plane is so safe, even Donald J. Trump could fly it ".

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Given the health of Boeing is deemed an issue of National Security by the Pentagon , the US Government will do all in its power to ensure this does not pose a risk to Boeings future. Passenger deaths due design decisions intended to maximize profits will be deemed “Collateral Damage”.

Watch for bills to be put in place that will limit Boeings exposure to financial liability.

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Nicky Haley has gone from governor of South Carolina to the Trump Administration to the Board of Boeing. She is spiraling out of control like the airplanes she builds. Unfortunately, she’ll get rich while the people she affects literally and figuratively hit the ground.

Just for the sake of transparency, it should be noted that Nader’s great niece, Samya Stumo, died on the Ethiopian flight. It also should be a warning to Boeing that he will be coming after the Max 8 with even more passion than he went after the Chevy Corvair. Unsafe At Any Speed 2.0

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And many thanks to Ralph Nader!
He is absolutely correct. Boeing (and most of corporate America) puts the Benjamins ahead of human life.
In Boeings case they ignored and I’m sure threatened their engineering people who are without doubt among the world’s best.
Those that made the decision to ignore them and tried to save their own asses with a software patch should spend the rest of their lives behind bars.

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Condolences, Ralph Nader. Thank you for the breakdown and detailing for organizing.

Something eerily reminiscent of whatshername from Alaska:
Hey … hows that corporate capture easy money Citizens United thingie dingy workin’ there for ya?

Visit the monopoly presentation of Boeing military. This is another connection that, not unlike the priorities exhibited here, really needs to be assessed in the context of MAGA dissociative premises of take-whatever-you-can-and-want-for as much-as-you-can-get.

We’re not talking about the conventions of a “nation state”, this is a wholly ‘other’ entity we need to come to terms with. Can you truly wrap your mind around the scale of the operation these represent?

Organize? you betcha

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I’m a pilot.

“The overriding problem is the basic unstable design of the 737 Max.” (Ralph Nader)

Concur - though I would substitute ‘unsafe’ for ‘unstable’ (all maneuverable planes are inherently somewhat unstable).

But - this is a recurring problem, encountered many many times in the Space Program, for example.

More generally - in a civilization you’ve got massive hierarchy - and a divorce of middle and upper management and admin from the guys who really know what they are doing - on the ground or in the air - and real live ‘skin in the game’.

Yea - pilots and unions cowed by the threat of job loss and banishment, effectively - I can relate.

So can everyone reading this.

Sully was a damn good pilot, that is the only reason the people on board survived.

Mercury, Gemini and Apollo proved time and again the value of top notch humans at the controls.

In a human world - there is no substitute for - humans.

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Her’s a good diagram - for those interested:

Basic Aerodynamics

Regarding this topic, I see a lot of sentiment on the left such as this:

For insight, articles on personal investing warn us of the two mortal sins of Wall Street, “greed” and “fear”, greed such as buying Bitcoin when it is going up, and fear such as selling Bitcoin when it is on its way down.

People who accuse Boeing of “greed” on this subject probably have it wrong. It looks more like “fear”, the fear that competitor Airbus (or a new entrant to the market, like Bombardier, or a Chinese company) will get orders instead and Boeing will lose money. It was fear that prompted Boeing to prioritize modifying the 737 over a new airplane, despite their original engineering judgment that a new airplane was a better idea.

The same thing about “fear” could be said of the FAA. Boeing provides good paying unionized jobs, something politicians, particularly Democrat politicians, like. And Boeing is a big and prominent exporter, another thing politicians, particularly Democrat politicians, like. So the FAA took cues from their political bosses, and made certifying the 737 MAX “easier” than it might have been.

I have two unanswered questions about this, so far.
First, executives are supposed to know that “getting caught out” is really bad for the company and their careers. As a recent example, just ask CEO Tim Sloan formerly of Wells Fargo about that. You would think that they make a note of what their engineers report to them, and even if they feel obliged to cut corners in getting a product out the door, that they would go back and revisit those corners to make sure that nothing “deadly” got out, and if some such did, to come up with a fix before a front-page-news disaster made them do it. Just look at Microsoft, which puts out fixes to each new version of Windows all the time. So did this, or did this not, happen with the 737 MAX?

Second, the buyers of airplanes for the airliners are supposed to be smarter than your average housewife buying breakfast cereal. That they know something about airplanes and developing them, and so can tell if the makers are blowing smoke in their faces; not totally reliant on the FAA saying “it’s good!” When Boeing’s CEO first says that designing a new airplane is the plan, and then says “We can modify a 737 to do it”, that should be a flag to look at how Boeing is modifying the 737, what the implications of that are, and what precautions they the airliners should take.

This article brings up a third, smaller, discrepancy in the news accounts.
Article “Using only one operating sensor (Airbus A320neo has three sensors), an optional warning light …”
Other articles say that the optional warning light tells the pilots that the two angle of attack sensors disagree. ¿How many angle of attack sensors does it have?

Whichever the case, I read recently about robust design the advice to have one chronometer or three chronometers, never two; because if they disagree, how do you know which is wrong?

Last,

I have read that military fighter jets are so maneuverable, and therefore so unstable, that they could not fly for more than three seconds if the flight control program failed. They require minute control surface adjustments that frequently in order to avoid crashing, something that even the best fighter pilot can’t do.
- So software can be a fix…

Since I’ve worked in a nearby industry, I will mention an idea and norm that Ralph Nader has not. When something, like a rocket such as the space shuttle, has a failure or an abnormal flight, then the rocket is grounded until the problem is identified and fixed. In this case, all 737 MAX-s should have been grounded after the Indonesian Lion flight, or earlier, and stayed grounded until the problem was found and fixed. [Ralph Nader’s opinion is that the problem is not fixable, and the planes should be ash-canned.]

A load of hooey from the resident Capitalist.

You would defend Attila the Hun and claim “He provided a lot of jobs for gravediggers”.

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If that is word you want to label me with, it isn’t worth my time to argue over it.

Dismissive, rather than responding to any of my statements.

As for Attila the Hun, it was someone else who wrote ‘The Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun’. I have heard the title, haven’t read it and have no recommendation.

Disgusting that they are using coercion to silence air traffic controllers, pilots, etc,etc! Also the hollow lobbyists are malicious as usual. This is textbook corporate homicide!