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Bolstering Call for Urgent Global Action, New Study Shows Microplastic Pollution 'Absolutely Everywhere'

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Bolstering Call for Urgent Global Action, New Study Shows Microplastic Pollution 'Absolutely Everywhere'

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

Bolstering global demands to #BreakFreeFromPlastic and end the world's worsening pollution crisis, a new study from the United Kingdom shows that "microplastics are being found absolutely everywhere."

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#2

Silicon Dioxide micro-particles are absolutely everywhere too. Generally sand at the beach(or anywhere else) isn’t considered to be a health hazard for anything though. :sunglasses:

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#3

The chemical industry really did a great job of promoting their products !
The precautionary principle was something from a science fiction novel .

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#4

Some industrial genius somewhere in China figured out that if you water down cow’s milk, then dump plastic into the mixture, the milk will still pass the government’s protein test for baby formula. It worked, but then 50 infants died from plastic ingestion.

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#5

Water is part of the COMMONS! We as individuals have a right to clean water beyond the power of the STATE!

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#6

Plastics are one of many toxins that are poisoning our water. Add in Oil Drilling, Fracking, Lawn Fertilizer runoff, Acid Rain and Radiation from Nuke Power Plants. Who’s gonna fix all of it? I don’t think there is Any Clean Water left on the Planet.

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#7

Pesticides too, and all of industrial ag, not just lawn fertilizer. Although studies show that chemical lawns are often more heavily dosed per area, than farms are.

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#8

The main problem getting effective action is:
The industries that need to be regulated or stopped from poisoning us, own and operate the “democracy” that is supposed to regulate the industries to protect our health and the ecology.

What we need at this stage of ecological degradation, is broad roll-back of “economic activity.” We need FAR LESS production, FAR LESS “consumer goods.” We need far less energy production, far less plastics, far less toxic chemical production. And of course, FAR LESS / NONE of war and military “production.”

We also need to replace chemical-intensive industrial agriculture producing mono-cropped industrial commodity crops, with ecologically-intensive, LABOR-INTENSIVE agroecology, permaculture, and regenerative organic agriculture.

But, the interested parties that profit immensely from war, from agriculture as war, from fossil fuels, and from toxics and plastics in general, have immense influence over politics and public policy, as well as over media and public discussion.

So, it is very nearly impossible to have a simple reality-based conversation about any of this with any of our “elected representatives.” Let alone, actually move forward any serious policy proposals to SLOW DOWN the predatory profiteering colonizing corporate industrial assault on the ecology.

We need a mass movement of self-educating people to free ourselves from the endless propaganda and start taking action outside of electoral or representative politics to shift both the public debate and the real political power on the ground.

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#9

The Graduate “One Word: Plastics”

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#10

Yes… Add that to the list!

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#11

Hi everyone,
This’ll be a little lengthy, and no doubt trivial, considering the magnitude of the problem, but based on the theory that “every little bit helps”, here’s the story:
I’m a professional “gardener”. In my neck of the woods (Northern California) I cut a lot of firebreak, chopping down weeds around homes, which, when dry, create a fire hazard. On slopes, where a lawnmower isn’t practical, the weapon of choice is usually a string trimmer, commonly, though inaccurately, called a “weedeater”. The plastic string is advanced as it is “used”, i. e., spewed into the environment… In an average season, I’ll spew tens of pounds of this stuff, already in micro size, all over the jobsites, from which it is no doubt carried, in the later rains, into Corte Madera Creek or Lagunitas Creek, and thence into the ocean. Some probably lingers and poisons the soil.
For many years now, every time I’ve fired up this 2-cycle, heavily air-polluting, noisy machine, at the end of the job, I’ve been saying to myself, “Man, I really need to buy a scythe, and learn how to use it.” But I’m 65, and loathe to embark on learning an entire new skill, and a possibly physically challenging one.
Anyway, I recently overcame my reluctance and ordered an Austrian scythe from a supply place in Maine. Last week I took it out for a test drive. All I can say, to quote the youth, OMG! This elegant, beautiful expression of appropriate technology is not only effortless to operate, but way faster than the string trimmer, the latter of which I have 40 years of practice with. And no more plastic into the environment, no more stress from the noise, vibration, and the rocks thrown in my face at the speed of a bullet, all of which the string trimmer has as fringe benefits.

I’m considering replacing the rototiller, now. Anybody got an ox and a plow you want to get rid of?

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#12

I was the first to address this over 30 years ago. Our first priority must be the demise of phytoplankton. Phytoplankton sequesters most of the CO2, feeds most of the lifeforms, and produces most of the oxygen. Phytoplankton has diminished by half in my lifetime because of PCB laced marine microplastic that originates on our roadways. As plankton goes we go and it’s going fast. We won’t need to pause and ponder climate change the plankton issue is imminent and will cause massive migration and starvation.

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#13

And manure runoff around any outdoor livestock operation.

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#14

HHmmm, so pharmaceutical pollution is becoming a problem eh? Well, with the “opioid crisis” currently underway this could prove interesting. The latest news on the opioid crisis tells us that pain management docs are becoming so paranoid of losing their license to the DEA they have stopped prescribing opioid painkillers to patients. This in turn had driven more people to heroin to control pain and stop withdrawal. Well it seems that a lot of today’s heroin is being cut with fentanyl which is apps. 100 times more potent than heroin. Since the DEA is most certainly cracking down on illicit fentanyl labs there is probably quite a lot of fentanyl being flushed into the wastewater system and eventually ends up in our water supply. No wonder I have this constant feeling of throwing my hands up and have this “just fuck it all” attitude!!! Oh by the way, did you ever imagine when you were growing up as a child that someday you would pay more for a glass of water than a gallon of gasoline? Well when you buy bottled water that is almost what you are doing. As for the plastic, one use bottle? Well that winds up in either the local landfill or eventually the ocean where it’s sits for eons trying to decompose but never does. Don’t buy bottled water!!! Get a reuseable jug, a water filter for your tap, and enjoy water that is more than likely cleaner than bottled water for less than one cent per jug and without the one use polluting plastic bottle. Sorry but bottled water is one of my pet peeves.

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#15

It’s in OUR water too.

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#16

Yes and many fish have become sterile from contraceptive pills being flushed. They however would love to say “just fuck it all”. (In their “speak” that’s probably what they are saying) What an abomination humans have turned this planet into.

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#17

Well a bit of fentanyl and those fishies should be smiling gill to gill. Oh and speaking of fish being sterile due to flushed birth control pills… well that just goes to show you that W.C.Fields was right in his refusal to drink water. (“Water? Never touch the stuff… fish fuck in water”)

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#18

I was there. I bought milk straight from farmers roadside stands, while my professional associate cautioned me to only buy the boxed stuff in stores because it was safer. They said the roadside stuff was watered down. My vendor wasn’t doing that, I know milk. A few months later the scandal broke out. It was melamine to up the protein content to pass watered down milk.
US and China share another food problem–oil. In the past the problem in China was recycling used deep frying oil. That was widespread and has been largely stopped. I still think the deep frying oil used everywhere should be filtered daily, as required in the US, but the smell tells me it has often not been. Using old oil can cause cancers.
The other world problem with oil is just the Canola–Canadian oil–is really better called car oil, because that is all it is good for. I am talking about the stuff from the yellow-flowered plant. Corn oil is as bad for you as sugar. And oils are in, well, just about everything. Skip fried food if you can. Few people can afford the better stuff, olive oil. You can bet the restaurants don’t use it.

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#19

I’m worried about metals in water, not the germs so much. Few places on earth actually add chlorine–and fluorine–like the US does. I am not sure that the big bottle that I get refilled weekly is anything but filtered water, but I would like more than just the germs out. Charcoal filter perhaps?

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#20

Synthetic fibres from our synthetic textiles go into the water every time we do laundry.

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