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Bolstering Single-Payer Case, Report Shows How For-Profit Insurers Fuel Opioid Crisis


#1

Bolstering Single-Payer Case, Report Shows How For-Profit Insurers Fuel Opioid Crisis

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

Showcasing yet another downside of the nation's for-profit system, a new report by ProPublica and the New York Times reveals that despite the U.S. opioid crisis, many insurance companies provide easy access to highly addictive opioid medications for pain relief while restricting access to less-risky but more costly alternatives.


#2

Lame-duck New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, by all accounts the most unpopular person ever to hold that office, has lately been barnstorming the opioid-crisis circuit in an attempt to salvage something positive out of his legacy.

It will be interesting to discover whether this article, which flies in the face of Brand R dogma, manages to inform his thinking. I’m not optimistic.


#3

There is no possibility of a privatized system for health care. That is an oxymoron. The so called free market system was never intended to work with a monopoly. I just paid the lowest possible price for LYRICA 461.00 for a month’s supply. We are trying to privatize the highway system by selling the interstate system to China. We have flirted with privatizing the military. We have hired goons and thugs as police and our legal system is corrupt all the way to the top. We have a flawed election system and whine like dying pigs about the government we have elected, proud of our meaningless vote.


#4

If there was ever justification for a congressional investigation it is now. The pharmaceutical industry should be investigated for malfeasance from top to bottom.

We could do this if the congress wasn’t corrupt.


#5

Last time I filled my Rx for 60 morphene, the cost to me was $3.20. Makes me wonder just how much opioids are such a big profit center?

Can we "fix’ this problem without sending more people to prison; and without making it more difficult for sick people to get needed medication?


#6

In my state it is pretty difficult to get an opioid pain medication. Several large chain pharmacies were charged for how they handle these medications and can only fill so many prescriptions. Many people were left untreated for pain on the basis of profiling that did not follow medical guidelines. So, now at least people are referred to pain management which should have been done in the first place.


#7

" . . . many insurance companies provide easy access to highly addictive opioid medications for pain relief while restricting access to less-risky but more costly alternatives." As stated, this is misleading. Surely when people become addicted to opioids, the drug manufacturers and insurance companies make money because addiction fuels the demand for the opioids. Selling the “less-risky but more costly alternatives” would mean making less money in the long run, because the demand for the “alternatives” would be less, since they would be less addictive.


#8

Illinois’ Attorney General Lisa Madigan just won a $4.5 million settlement 8/2017 for Illionois from Illinois’ opioid lawsuit with Insys Pharm. Insys was, for one, off label marketing their cancer pain drug subsys (fentanyl) through their paid off doctors for such things as migraines. Nail the devious Pharm, and for-profit insurers, and not the patients undergoing pain management. Opioids are very much needed, and marijuana also can help with lower level pain issues; however, this congress most likely is heavily invested in the problem pharms, and insurers, no use there. State Attorney Generals are the ones fighting the fights, and winning.