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BP-Sponsored 'Sunken Cities' Show Provokes Museum-Climbing Climate Protest


#1

BP-Sponsored 'Sunken Cities' Show Provokes Museum-Climbing Climate Protest

Nika Knight, staff writer

London's British Museum was shut down on Thursday after Greenpeace activists scaled its columns to call on the museum to drop BP's sponsorship for a "blockbuster" exhibit—about flooded cities.

"Sunken cities aren't a thing of the past, they are happening now. And if BP gets its way, they could come to define our future."
—Greenpeace


#2

Great action to bring public focus to the despicable reality of BP.

(Aside: The British Museum should return all its stolen treasures to the places they were originally looted from by the British Empire.)


#3

This is a real interesting exhibition showing the mix of Egyptian and Greek cultures thousands of years ago. About 90% of the artifacts are still underwater so it will be a long time before they can all be retrieved if that is the goal. However, I can think of better sponsors than BP.


#4

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#5

BP - Bloody Pikers or Big Polluters.. Wonder how many "Sunken Cities" they have destroyed over the years with their offshore drilling and I am not referring to only those created by man...cities created by corals that brim with life but are endangered to day by BIG POLLUTERS.


#6

i saw a headline in Prensa Libre yesterday (i read the on-line version of the Guatemalan newspaper), asserting that geologic records show that at the current temperature of the Earth, past sea levels were 8 meters higher than today's sea level. More than 27 feet higher. Bye-bye London (or Ta-ta as the Brits say), along with most major coastal cities.

And the global heating has not stopped, by any means. Atmospheric carbon has not been at this level (now over 400 ppm CO2, swiftly approaching a 50% increase caused by human activities in the geologic eye-blink of less than 400 years) since millions of years ago.

If we stop burning fossil fuels; stop deforestation; transform industrial agriculture; and roll out a humanity-wide practice of agroecology, permaculture, and tree-planting: we may avert catastrophic collapse of the ecology and civilization.

Absent such transformation, it seems the die is cast.


#7

It's a pity that all the Iraqi treasures were not in the British Museum when the USA and UK invaded Iraq.

BP is simply working to create more underwater treasures for the benefit of the future generations; just think of the potential for mini-submarine tours through the network of London's underground railway system! View the wine cellars of Parliament on one of my scuba-diving wine-tasting expeditions!


#8

No, the pity is the invasion.

Way back in 1958, the great American director Frank Capra produced this film about the mighty sea, in which he projected into the future where Miami would be below water from global warming, viewable by tourists from glass-bottomed boats...