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Bring Them Home: The Grisly Legacy of Kill the Indian, Save the Man


#1

Bring Them Home: The Grisly Legacy of Kill the Indian, Save the Man

Over 100 years after the children of their ancestors were taken East by white men who cut their hair, changed their names, banned their language and cleansed their "savage natures" - while, alas, often killing them with disease - Native Americans are now fighting to bring back from the infamous Carlisle School the small bodies of those lost to the "noble experiment" of forced assimilation. Says one, "We're trying to make peace with those spirits, and bring them home."


#2

Carlisle - closed in 1918, it is now the U.S. Army War College - and the cemetery

Boy if that doesn't say it all. Army, War, Death. Get a Clue.

The deeper one looks into this the worse it becomes.This was the US's version of Mengele experimentation.
If you ever have the chance to discuss Carlisle with a Native American,and it's affect on their families, it comes across like Auschwitz.

The carving of the Founding Fathers over the mountain known to the Sioux as Six Grandfathers was no mistake either. It is a constant reminder of the Domination.

Seek out the Old Ones, they have much to teach.


#3

This is America's legacy in promoting freedom and liberty...... NOT!!!!!
Democracy?..... NOT!!!!!
Now we got those white boys in Oregon complaining about "their land" being taken away by the mean ole gubmint? Poor wittle babies.....
I dance at powwows in the SE and most if not all the "natives" around here are so colonized that they are largely unrecognizable as natives. It saddens me. They'll be praying to jesus and even doing christian worship sunday morning before the tourists start coming in. Sometimes, I just want to give them a mouthful peyote to eat.... Let's breakthrough all that colonization in your mind there. Yet even the Native American Church is very christianized.


#4

Early on In Canada's own history the First nations people fared relatively well alongside the European migrants. This due in great part because the French saw the First nations peoples as trading partners and wanted close relationships with them. The British followed this practice early on when they took over as they felt the First Nations peoples would help as a bulwark against American expansionism.

This changed around 1880 when numbers of peoples in Government came to subscribe to the beliefs of one Cecil Rhodes an Imperialist and racist who believed that the Anglo-saxon race was destined to rule the globe and was the first race amongst races. Yes this stuff was going on in the Empire long before it happened in Germany.

They then enforced the policy of forced assimilation much like in the USA where children were forcibly taken from their Communities to be raised and schooled hundreds of miles away. Many saw their parents for only a few short weeks each year.

6000 in total died while attending school by official numbers but it my opinion the numbers higher. It was felt that the First Nations peoples were inferior to the Whites so the education they would receive would be that of servants so that they could work FOR whites.

The last of these schools was not closed until in the 1990s.


#5

Yesterday I had the good fortune to meet and listen to Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States. Her talk focused on the connection of US military history to the war on Indians or so-called "Indian Wars". She made the very convincing argument that the entire history of the US including the present Empire sprawl with military bases across almost every nation on Earth stem directly from this and that this mentality and reflex is carried out in all the intentions of the US in all their wars. Perhaps the deepest part of her discussion was the insight that unless the US as a nation brings the crimes against the original peoples to the fore of the national consciousness we as a nation will continue on the current path until we self destruct. She talked about this need for descendants of the original invaders and the immigrants who keep coming to the US to see themselves as innocent but the problem is that this intention to utterly destroy the indigenes is at the heart of all the institutions in the US and plays out its most ominous role in the US military adventures. Until we who are not indigenes take on the role of resisters to this historic wrong and insist that it be first brought to the consciousness of the nation so as to atone for it we will be trapped in an escalating circle of violence which will ultimately destroy us all. I recommend seeing Michael Moore's new film, Where to Invade Next, and pay particular attention to the scene in a German High school where a person of color, having accepted his German citizenship recognizes his responsibility to take on the "karma" of the German peoples as it especially played out in Nazi Germany. Every where in Germany there are reminders of the crimes of the Holocaust and it is part of the educational intent to remind all Germans of their horrific history so it does not get repeated.


#6

Thanks for that bit of Canadian history. The same racists who also populated Australia had very similar forced assimilation of Aboriginal children.


#7

The desire to destroy all of the Natives goes right back to the beginning. Jefferson wrote of his vision of the Anglo-saxon race ruling all of North America. In his writings he suggested the Native Americans would simply vanish from the scene as an inferior groups of people.

An excellent book on the subject was recommended by a reader here.

Facing West: The Metaphysics of Indian-Hating and Empire-Building

By Richard Drinnon


#8

American Exceptionalism!? This country was built on genocide and slavery, on the graves of natives and on the backs of slaves. Today's racist, sexist, authoritarian, ignorant, oligarchic right wing embodies this 'exceptionalism'.


#9

I'd add Pagans in the Promised Land by Steven Newcomb. A slim little volume chock full of documentation of the linguistic contortions used to create 'nullius' (to make you think the 'other' does not exist) concepts. The title itself being a case in point of insidiously constructed polarities.


#10

Thanks for that. Will pick it up. Jefferson is no one I admire for his racism against Black and indigenous people. The "American" experiment, in my view, belonged in Europe, England specifically. Ortiz mentioned this author.


#11

Thanks!


#12

Most of the American people are brainwashed into thinking this nation always has been & always will be exceptional & the greatest nation in the world. The USA was built on land stolen from Native Americans, Since most Native Americans died from wars & diseases, Blacks were brought from Africa to be slaves. Later in its history, the USA took land from Mexico in the Mexican War, took Spain's last colonies in the Western Hemisphere & the Pacific, treated Asian immigrants badly when they were allowed to immigrate , annexed Hawaii & imprisoned its queen and put Japanese-Americans in concentration camps & dropped 2 A-bombs on Japan after they surrendered.


#13

The Native American Genocide is still ongoing!
"As the U.S. government waged its turn-of-the-century cultural genocide - taking native lands, corralling native survivors into reservations and erasing native identities" The Feds are still stealing Native American lands, still "whitening" them, and still depriving NA's their rights!
http://endgenocide.org/learn/past-genocides/native-americans/

Another aspect of the Native American cultural genocide was the slaughter/extermination of the Native American wild horse/pony - central to the culture of the Lakota/Dakota plains tribes. Lakota oral history speaks of the wild horse as part of their culture BEFORE horses were brought to the Americas by the Spanish! Evidence the wild horse survived the last mega-fauna die-off!
Most of those native North American horses were destroyed, shot by the Federal troops in the 1800's, but the wild horse genocide is still ongoing along with the Native American Cultural Genocide!

The wild horse, buffalo, and other indigenous animals especially large predators, are STILL being exterminated and deprived of their habitat/lands, along with NA's, to protect millions of domestic cattle/sheep run on "public" lands! Those animals are an integral part of Native American culture!

http://www.savingamericashorses.org/In_Truth_of_Wild%20Horses_on_Native_Lands_and_Tongue.pdf

http://www.law.seattleu.edu/Documents/ailj/Spring%202015/EagleWoman.pdf


#15

Right on the mark.

Check this out:

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/35381-the-indigenous-world-under-a-nuclear-cloud


#17

The indigenous peoples of the world will have the last laugh as this gargantuan mistake known as western civilization collapses. They always warned this path was unwise and not sustainable. Now with the oceans dying, forests gone, air and water polluted, soil blown away on the wind, deserts expanding everywhere, entire webs of life collapsing, 200 species every day going extinct, and a climate spinning inexorably into runaway catastrophe, the obvious could not be any more clear.

They were right. The European dominator culture was wrong. It is a sick, demented, power-lusting techno-industrial death cult.

The hubris of this filthy, sociopathic culture will be its downfall. And soon. Good riddance. Good riddance.


#18

Thanks for this information about what happened in Canada.


#19

Thanks for telling us about this insight from Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, the author of "An Indigenous People's History of the United States." It helped me to understand some things that have been going on, not only on this continent, but all over the world.


#20

Thanks Giovanna, ordered the book...


#22

Thanks bluedolphin_9, l was discussing our warring habits with a friend yesterday and he mentioned statistics that began with the carpet bombing of Dresden through Tokyo, that changed War from a fight the enemy troops scenario, to a civilian casualty scenario. While l can't support the statistics, I do know that FDR formed a commission to look at the "effectiveness" of such warfare headed by none other than Curtis LeMay. That commission found that it Was effective (not suprising considering LeMay) but a minority report was insisted on by John Kenneth Galbreath that stated that they were ineffective and probably War Crimes. Just another aspect of our hidden history.


#24

Once more a major factor of Native Americans has been lost in argument about historical right and wrongs.

"We're trying to make peace with those spirits, and bring them home." the relevant statement from the
posted article is the factor ignored. The attempt to "Christianize" the "natives" is contrary to the belief system
shared by most groups related to death and dying. Perhaps it might be more acceptable if each soul
removed back to their origins would be buried with a cross?

"Although Native Americans represent a large and diverse group, they hold some common beliefs regarding
burials and the proliferation of souls in the afterlife. A basic understanding of these beliefs can be helpful
when attending a native funeral, or when providing comfort to a native friend or coworker mourning the loss
of a loved one.
Afterlife
According to Native American beliefs, a spirit never dies. Rather, death is the beginning of a journey to
another world. Prior to beginning this final journey, the deceased's spirit typically travels to the places it
has known on earth. This earthly journey may take up to four days, sometimes longer. If the spirit does
not have a good journey, the soul may return as a ghost to haunt the living. Ghost stories are common in
Native American folklore, although ghosts are not necessarily viewed as malicious.