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Brits Battle Floods and Transport Troubles to Vote in Historic Brexit Referendum


#1


#7

it really don't matter how the vote goes is 'non binding' and regardless the govt will do what they want


#8

http://southendnewsnetwork.com/news/breaking-referendum-in-chaos-as-ballot-counting-computers-only-register-remain-votes-in-tests/

More fraud? I always find it odd how these errors always error on the side of what the 1 percent desires.


#9

It seems as if the "Leaves" will win.

"Don't you just love it when a good plan comes together?"

I have been tracking the live feeds since the polls closed. And, I am ever so excited. By the way, to whomever makes statements as to the non-binding nature of the referendum's outcome, I say, "A pox on you!."

Ahhh... Okay now... Where was I? Oh, yeah,...

That said, why can't the purportedly democratic state of the United States embrace such an institution such as a national referendum, instead of permitting those nasty "fast-track" deals and ominous presidential executive orders? Pardon me for saying so, but, I find those such practices to be tantamount to inveiglement, subterfuge and "unholy" machinations. For, they appear to be used almost invariably to ultimately circumvent the express wishes of the citizenry and undermine the collective welfare. (Go figure!)

I mean wouldn't a democratic nation allow for its constituents to have a direct voice in deciding free-trade pacts like TPP and TTIP? Why instead permit shady, back-room deals and then rush the process of Congressional approval that is probably tainted with undue coercion and also lack of genuine understanding as to just on what they are voting.

By the way, I consider certain free-trade deals as dubious mechanisms by which the powers behind the government usurp the power of of the citizenry. Moreover, those sorts of pacts arguably seek to accomplish many of the same goals of European Union and the drive toward a one-world government; but it is being done piece-meal and in slow-motion. (Nice!)


#12

Live Tracking here:

Regardless of an expected Brexit, I am substantially certain that the aristocrats and entrenched global power-brokers will simply regard it as a temporary set back. I do suppose that—in the long-run— they have a Plan B, just in case. After all, they haven't maintained a historic stranglehold on the status quo by giving up so easily. Sooo... If history is any testament, they will inevitably recoup their losses, with interest, one way or another. In closing, at the risk of seeming overly pessimistic, it would be ever so naïve of me to expect otherwise.


#13

11:45 PM east coast US

BBC just called it, and the people of Britain will wake - up to independent Britain.BREXIT IT IS!
Markets are reeling!


#15

WWWoooowwww!!!!! Real change.... I can't believe it....


#16

Good! It will be painful for a while, but good for the rest of the EU in the long run. The UK was much too insular, to fit into the community, always demanded special treatment, never a team player


#17

Folks, this is not a mandatory call. British Pundits are already claiming this merely an advisory referendum and are claiming Cameron can ignore the results.

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Labour former Europe Minister Keith Vaz told the BBC the British people had voted with their "emotions" and rejected the advice of experts who had warned about the economic impact of leaving the EU.
He said the EU should call an emergency summit to deal with the aftermath of the vote, which he described as "catastrophic for our country, for the rest of Europe and for the rest of the world".

Now it going to be hard for Cameron to do this but some insist that he should simply stay in the EU and placate the "leave crowd" with some changes to the treaty of membership so as to give the UK a bit more independence when it comes to the hot button issues.

That said even if Cameron tries to cheat on the results, the move to leave the EU will spread to other Countries.


#18

Well, dammit. I'll just have to go off and find me an Empire again! One could well wonder how it will affect soccer in the UK. Will the excellent foreign players be able to play for UK's teams? Will our mediocre players still be able to go to Italy and Spain to learn how soccer should be played? And I really would have liked to have kept my EU passport so I could work and live in Europe anywhere I chose; maybe I could have picked up some of those Greek islands for a couple of quid................Now all I can do is steal any of the Greek marbles we haven't stolen.

Once in, we should've stayed in; at least we would have been able to have kept teaching those Frenchies a proper language............


#19

Tariq Ali makes a great case for the left supporting leave as well.


#20

Chances are this is the last Euro Cup for all those pieces of UK: England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland who are allowed to play as separate teams. What a farce.


#22

Let's see we have the financial elites all favouring one side. All things on the left don't get media attention whilst the loud-mouthed louts with their neoNazi, racist hate mongering are front and center. Which side to choose?

And then there is this UK-EU thingy.


#24

With all due respect, myriad articles and comments by leading UK states-persons almost invariably state the opposite. Brexit is a done deal! Also, for the sake of expediency and in support of my assertion, I provide the following BBC quote:

"The campaign to leave the European Union has won the referendum. It means the UK is now committed to withdrawing from the group of 28 countries, a process that has come to be known as Brexit. What does this mean for the UK and EU?" (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36575186)

That said, it will be interesting to see just how Scotland and Northern Ireland ultimately react to the Brexit victory, as those countries find it to be contrary to their welfare.

Also, I did read a rather succinct listing by Andrew Sparrow of what may lie ahead for the PM. I took the liberty of including its content below:

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/24/eight-questions-cameron-must-address-when-he-speaks-to-nation

8 questions Cameron must address when he speaks to the nation

David Cameron is expected to address the nation this morning, and he may well be writing his speech now. Here are some of the questions he has to address.
1 - What will be done to calm the markets? With the pound in freefall, will the Bank of England intervene? There has even been talk of closing the stock market to stop panic selling of share. Cameron will have to say something to steady nerves.
2 - Will he remain as prime minister? No one expects him to leave Number 10 this morning, but does he really think he will be able to oversee the EU withdrawal process over the next few year? Perhaps he does. More likely, he will recognise that is unrealistic. In that case it is possible that he may announce his intention to stand down later this year, possibly before the Tory conference.
3 - Will he invoke article 50 of the Lisbon treaty immediately? This is the process that starts the two-year countdown to Brexit. Before the referendum Cameron said he would trigger article 50 straightaway, but there is no reason why he should and every reason to delay. It makes no sense to start the two-year clock running until the UK knows what it wants. He would be wise to clarify his intentions.
4 - Will parliament be recalled? There is a strong case for saying it should sit on Saturday, to allow the government to assure MPs that it has a plan before markets open again on Monday.
5 - Who will be in charge of the withdrawal negotiations? This begs the huge question as to what mandate will apply to those doing the negotiating. Will Cameron seek cross-party agreement? Will he take the Vote Leave programme as a manifesto he is bound to honour? For example, will the UK definitely withdraw from the single market?
6 - Will there be an emergency budget? George Osborne said an emergency budget would be necessary this summer. Does that still apply, or will Cameron write that off as campaign scaremongering?
7 - Will there be an election? There is a case for saying a new prime minister may need a mandate for the withdrawal negotiations – although there are probably very few people in Westminster with the appetite for another election now?
8 - Does Cameron accept that the Scots have the right to have a second independence referendum? During the campaign he said the 2014 referendum was supposed to last for a generation, but there were some moments during the campaign when he accepted that the Scots would have a case for demanding a second referendum if they voted to stay in the EU while the UK as a whole voted out. And that is what has happened.


#25

Never mind; all our little bits and pieces can still all lose the World Cup every four years. And the Isle of Wight is still part of Empire!


#27

Thank you CSPAN for covering this vote as it happened. Just heard the results announced-I think the US could learn something about counting votes---they actually announced votes that could not be counted????

The message before the vote was that if Britain votes to leave-that's it! your out! now we are hearing"its non-binding" and maybe there needs to be a vote on the final deal.

Some guy representing the EU referred to Britain as" tenants"

Another guy from Blackstone was saying the EU needs to get tough with other countries that might be thinking of leaving---a commentator challenged back that this might be the problem????

Another commentator was perplexed that people don't understand that nationalism is ending and trade agreements trump sovereign rights??????

Just remember both major parties labor and tory supported to stay in the EU. And sadly listening to media outlets here even on the "left" those for exit were right wing haters-----but many in the labor party supported exit.

And today I'm actually listening to MSNBC talk about economic issues--wow!

Thank you Britain for having the guts to send a message to the corporate elite


#28

Hmm, Makes me wonder if this Tory vote will give the U.S. red states ideas -- again. This time, I'm inclined to let them. They'll then try to exist without the federal largesse they so highly depend on as it is, all the while complaining about the deficits. My bet is the first thing they'll do is re-institute slavery. After all, that is what states' rights are all about. Then the blue states' surviving corporates can outsource their labor to the slavers without extensive logistics being involved.

SPLF


#30

See also the Guardian's Brexit Live column which posted the following item:

David Cameron Resigns aftter EU Referendum Result

"Here is the key quote from Cameron, where he announces his resignation.
I was absolutely clear [in the referendum] about my belief that Britain is stronger, safer and better off inside the European Union. And I made clear the referendum was about this and this alone, not the future of any single politician, including myself. But the British people have made a very clear decision to take a different path and as such I think the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction. I will do everything I can as prime minister to steady the ship over the coming weeks and months. But I do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination.

This is not a decision I have taken lightly. But I do believe it’s in the national interest to have a period of stability and then the new leadership required. There is no need for a precise timetable today. But in my view we should aim to have a new prime minister in place by the start of the Conservative party conference in October."

That said, until the UK invokes and subsequently abides by the provisions of article 50 of the Lisbon treaty, it is still has rights and obligations pursuant to its EU mandate.

The European council president, Donald Tusk, stated, “On behalf of the 27 leaders I can say that we determined to keep our unity as 27, for us the union is the framework for our common future. I would like to reassure you that there will be no legal vacuum. Until the United Kingdom formerly leaves the European Union, EU law will continue to apply to and within the UK. By this I mean rights as well as obligations. All the procedures for the withdrawal of the UK from the EU are clear and set out in the treaties.” ((http://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2016/jun/23/eu-referendum-result-live-counting-leave-remain-brain-in-europe))


#31

Yes. when the results are ignored, there can be a general strike, tax revolt and citizen arrest of the government. People have had enough..


#32

Can we now have a vote in the US to leave the WTO?