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Calling for 'Radical Shift' in Drug Policy, Ireland Moves to Decriminalize


#1

Calling for 'Radical Shift' in Drug Policy, Ireland Moves to Decriminalize

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

Moving away from the prevailing Drug War paradigm under which users and addicts are shamed and criminalized, Ireland's chief of National Drugs Strategy said Monday that he is backing the decriminalization of a number of narcotics and will be opening supervised injection rooms beginning next year.


#2

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#3

The War on Drugs has never really been about drugs, per se. It's about the various branches of gov't using their powers, to war on certain groups, ( Control freaks and worse, anyone ) who have been more inclined to use drugs. And, the profiteers are stockholders and racists who control the mechanisms of LE & The Judiciary who, in turn, enforce the orders and rules handed them. The Iran-Contra debacle is prima facie evidence of what has really been going on since Nixon's War on Drugs, started. There's another War going on, alright, but it's not about drugs but laundering $$$. Good for Ireland and the countries who are seeing this for what it really is; hoodwinkery, bamboozlement and gov't criminality of the highest order.


#4

No problem with legalization of everything.

What's gonna happen tho, the Irish taxpayer is gonna be on the hook for those "supervised injection rooms". They were just complaining last year about having to pay more for water.


#6

More and more, I am considering Ireland as my choice destination to get OUT of this shitty toilet called "murka" in all seriousness by the brain dead trailer park set who vote against their own interests. I also have the advantage of my mama being from there, which can get me in with no problem at all, now.

The problem will likely be the neo-nazis NOT letting people get out.


#7

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#8

Oh, i totally agree. I just don't want to shift the cost from locking them up to feeding their habit.

Anyone should be able to smoke, sniff, shoot up or ingest whatever they want, if they can afford it. Looking at the possession imprisonment rate, seems a lot of people are not so poor after all.


#9

I too have my eyes on Ireland as a possible new home. Ireland manages to educate their children right through college or a technical degree, and now this.

The U.S. federal government spent over $15 billion dollars in 2010 on the War on Drugs, at a rate of about $500 per second. The failed US drug war has not only cost taxpayers over a trillion dollars since its inception, it has helped foster the privatization of prisons and locked up more people per capita than any other nation, and is driving violent crime south of the border. It is interesting that the cost of this failed war equals the debt carried by today's college students. Talk about a misappropriation of taxpayer dollars.


#10

The number one US top forty song for at least two weeks is "I can't feel my face when I'm with You,
a supposed ballad to cocaine. (I know, Clapton said the same thing, and society did not collapse)

The Roseburg Oregon school shooter posted: " I have a bottle with 5 kinds of pills in it. I don't know which ones are the sleep aids so I took 2 of each". Maybe scrip psych drug control is as important as gun control??

My mom took an extra job to send me to private school with the ruling class. In 7th grade we had a three day drug education class. All other classes were canceled and we spent all morning and afternoon for three days learning about drugs. We learned the types of drugs: stimulants,depressants, narcotics, psycho actives, and how they affect the brain, body and nervous system. We learned the addiction mechanisms, and studied dysfunctional / co dependent / enabling behavior. We learned that if you are blacked out on alcohol, stage 3, you are one step from stage 4; comatose and death. We learned that if someone is blacked out do not let them sleep on their back or they might drown in their vomit. We learned that marijuana is a psychoactive, not a narcotic.

Guess what, I have never tried narcotics, crack, or meth. We also had a three day sex education class.

I would not condone legalization of meth, heroin, or coke. I would not care if the non narcotic marijuana were legal.

Educate!


#11

You might have a case if it weren't for the legal use of alcohol which kills more people annually than all illicit drug use combined. Layer over that abuse of legal prescription drugs which take additional lives.

The fact is the human species has been self-medicating throughout civilization, legal or not. Our laws should coincide with human behavior, and it is nothing short of hypocritical to indiscriminately make some drugs legal and other drugs illegal.

The war on drugs is a profit machine for the MIC, law enforcement, and criminal elements who run the black market. Legalization, regulation, and treatment of addiction for illicit drugs is the answer, the same way we treat alcohol and pharmaceutical sales and consumption.


#12

Agreed, I have said the same that all peoples on all continents have found ways to intoxicate for millennia, as do I.

I do not think it is indiscriminate to have PCP or meth or heroin be illegal. They are wholly addictive drugs that destroy lives faster than alcohol, and might destroy many more lives if they were legal and available.

I agree with your 2nd & 3rd comments. I also agree that alcohol is dangerous. I find it somewhat crazy that the US is 5% of the global populous but takes 50% of global scrip drugs. Add to that that some public health officials now think Oxycontin is a getaway drug to heroin, and I would say our war on drugs is poorly founded. Maybe we need better choices?

Off to work now Thanx, Tom


#13

I trust drug addiction has little or even nothing to do with addicting to substances; it relates more to lack of adequate and supportive social and natural environments.

Two inspirational videos: