Home | About | Donate

Calling Out Drone War as a War Crime


#1

Calling Out Drone War as a War Crime

Dennis Bernstein, Ann Wright

Leading the charge against the U.S. “drone war” — now a key part of the Pentagon’s forward fighting strategy — is an unlikely individual, Colonel Ann Wright, who spent most of her adult life as a diplomat, working in the U.S. State Department.

Colonel Wright reopened the U.S. embassy in Kabul in 2001. But in 2003 she took an action that would transform her life. She resigned her position in opposition to the then-impending U.S. invasion of Iraq. Since then, she has become a full time global peace activist.


#2

Thank you, Ann Wright for your principled, conscientious work in bringing more public awareness to this travesty, truly, a Crime Against Humanity.


#4

Obama's legacy will be a criminal legacy on several fronts, but none more so than his elevating elevating drone warfare to the status of a major weapons system and using his knowledge of constitutional law not to defend the constitution, but to put his drone warfare beyond the reach of the law. This is what he hand to the next war monger in chief, either Clinton or Trump. Meanwhile the media and the Democrats continue to perpetuate the myth of Obama, the reluctant warrior.

I have said it many times, but it bears repeating. The line that separates a policy of government intervention outside this country versus the policy of government intervention inside this country is paper thin and growing thinner with each passing year. It is indeed a very small step for a government that can justify executing an American citizen outside our borders without due course of law, to justify doing so within our borders. Can't happen here? Think Patriot Act, NDAA and other measures used to bypass civil liberties.


#5

I can't understand how the American people can remain so silent about such an obvious horrendous WRONG that is perpetrated on the people of the world in their name.

In my mind there has never been an aggressive as cowardly as a drone strike. It bears the hallmark of someone who does not have the courage of their convictions, has more money than guts, is afraid to look at their adversary in the eye or announce their accusation before the execution of the victim and a group of defenseless innocents. In other words - the most repulsive cowardly act imaginable.

Two can play this game... Once this is established as a "legitimate" form of warfare and the adversaries of the western "alliance" get hold of this technology - it is going to be deployed in our own cities and back yards. Remember - the drones don't have to cross borders and they will be difficult to control and detect before the damage is done.

This opens the flood-gate to "dirty tactics" and we have no idea how "dirty" the tactics can get once people have lost everything including total respect for their "enemy" - read ALL Americans. Drone strikes are not the only means of cowardly action towards unsuspecting civilians - there are many other actions that can devastate a society and cannot be prevented by "border control" or airport baggage checks.

So before you choose to remain silent in the face of obvious and grossly unfair brutality perpetrated in YOUR NAME. you have to ask yourself "Do I feel lucky?"


#7

In general, I believe all the careless killing is based on a conscious, semisecret foreign policy based on (among others) these two principles
1 Fulfilling a perceived need to fully develop the drone program and work all the bugs out, to prepare for "the Big One", [WW3], and
2 Securing the U.S.'s energy future for the rest of this century and into the 22nd century. In this view, killing of innocents is unfortunate but necessary. The people of the countries the U.S. attacks are considered less than fully human*, are considered expendable, and in any case are seen as a renewable resource, unlike the oil and minerals above which they live.

*There is lots of evidence to back this up; but one word says it all: haji

In even more general:
In my daily life over the past few years, for every person who cares about the war, or about the drone part of it, or about the root event 15 years ago, there are fifty people who are either uninterested or hostile if the subject of U.S. wars is brought up.
I'm very glad that some people do care, even to the point of some sacrifice; these are heroes in my book (the author, among others). But so few! It really seems to me that the vast majority of Americans rarely even think about the ongoing war, nor do they factor the war into their voting choices (at least, so it seems)- except rarely.

The drone war: "Out of sight, out of mind."
I suppose this state of things was/is part of the overall "volunteer" military plan.


#8

Yes, all the more reason to outlaw the use of drones for attack before it is too late.

Films like "The Eye In The Sky" are already used as propaganda to legitimize their use by falsely presenting moral anguish, responsible consideration and restraining bureaucracy behind deployment. The secret surveillance technology is also on display.

The message is two-fold: "We know what we are doing". "If we come after you - you will be in trouble".


#10

Bernie Sanders is a big fan of the drones, FYI.

I hope he stays in the race, to prove to the naysayers that he is not a sheepdog, but instead a bona fide Trojan Horse.


#11

Yes, Bernie is a big fan of drones. Feeling the Bern will get you burned. Bernie's " A Future To Believe In" is a lot like Obama's "Change You Can Believe In".