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Cancer with Political Clout


#1

Cancer with Political Clout

Robert C. Koehler

A suicide bomber inflicts hell at a concert hall in Manchester, England that’s full of children, as though that was the point — to murder children.

The horror of war . . . well, terrorism . . . doesn’t get any worse.

And the media, as they focus on the spectacle of what happened, as they cover the particulars of the tragedy — the suspect’s name and ethnicity and apparent grievances, the anguish of the survivors, the names and ages of the victims — quietly tear the incident loose from most of its complexity and most of its context.


#2

Thank you Robert--as usual, perspicacious, trenchant and humane thoughts. You write from your intellect and heart, with values most progressives can defend. How do we live them? What can we do to stop the War-is-Our-Business that is American policy? We have it in our potential to be such a great people, so diverse, so many talents and aspirations. Just now, we can speak relatively freely, some can write (and be read) relatively freely, but action to change things is so much more complicated.
I see those bodies, that our news won't show us, in Yemen, Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, Paris, Manchester...and all those mostly young people form our military who have died, over 7,000 now, or whose bodies are broken--for what? And I feel so impotent, as many of us do. I appreciate your writing, and I want some inspired action plan to address this state of our nation, asap. (Foolish expectation, I agree).


#3

Why is it that what the Saudis (and by extension, we) are doing to the huddled masses in Yemen, not terrorism?


#4

Again another fine piece from Mr. Koehler. The moral (and practical) choices we face could not be made more clear. How can anyone, citizen or politician, read this and then justify the continued terrorism the west inflicts upon the world on behalf of the corporate warlords? I seriously believe that keeping this obvious choice of war or peace, death or life front and center of all political discourse is key to making it part of the thinking of everyone.


#5

Spot on Robert Koehler !

I was just thinking this morning - there is only one kind of leadership that I respect - example.

When we stop being colonial powers - stop the drone attacks, etc etc...

Then things will improve.

Just watched the new "Jason Bourne" movie.

What if Jason Bourne, representing "us" - were to single-handedly "win" over the vast corruption of the deep state?

Is this possible ?

Maybe ~

"Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people?
Is there any better or equal hope in the world ?"
- First Inaugural Address, Abraham Lincoln

"There are two very natural propensities which we may distinguish in the most virtuous and liberal dispositions - the love of pleasure and the love of action. If the former is refined by a just regard to economy, to health, and to reputation, it is productive of the greatest part of the happiness of private life. The love of action is a principle of a much stronger and more doubtful nature. It often leads to anger, to ambition, and to revenge; but when it is guided by the sense of propriety and benevolence, it becomes the parent of every virtue, and, if those virtues are accompanied with equal abilities, a family, a state, or an empire, may be indebted for their safety and prosperity to the undaunted courage of a single man."

  • Edward Gibbon, "The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire"

I am waxing optimistic - as clearly worldwide environmentalism is taking hold.

For a newly discovered upbeat movie with multiple layers of meaning to us in The Anthropocene, and Mexican music too, my favorite movie of all time, just discovered:

"The Milagro Beanfield War", produced by Robert Redford.


#6

Robert Koehler, as always, once again says the things that most journalists either will not or cannot say. It is always good to read his thoughts and feelings, and those of Chris Hedges.

My heartfelt thanks extend to both of these courageous gentlemen, for always telling the human side of these events, and how they are largely the product of policies that we, as a society, bear responsibility for.


#7
To my ongoing perplexity and despair, what is never part of the story is the concept of karma: what goes around comes around. A culture of violence isn’t the creation of a few lost, “radicalized” souls, nor is it simply the doing of the current “enemy.” Violence is part of our social foundation. It is institutionalized, well-funded, profitable — and ongoing.

sad but true: the united states has a long history of violence perpetrated by a culture of violence. what percentage of us are pacifists, i wonder? well, pretty sure we're outnumbered and i don't think we can turn the tide. all we can do is live as we believe and speak what we believe.

an hope someone hears.

:yin_yang:
~ :heart: ~ :heart: ~ :heart: ~


#8
A suicide bomber inflicts hell at a concert hall in Manchester, England that’s full of children, as though that was the point — to murder children.
The horror of war . . . well, terrorism . . . doesn’t get any worse.

And the media, as they focus on the spectacle of what happened, as they cover the particulars of the tragedy — the suspect’s name and ethnicity and apparent grievances, the anguish of the survivors, the names and ages of the victims — quietly tear the incident loose from most of its complexity and most of its context.

today i watched a democracy now! interview with glen greenwald and jeromy scahill. greenwald pointed out that when empire america bombs a wedding or funeral in the middle east we hear all about how many al qaeda or isis militant died, but very little attention to the numerous innocent victims. and i'm not sure at all that the so-called enemy count is accurate. glen believes that were u.s. viewers to see the humans---the elderly, the women and the children dismissed as collateral damage, our natural empathy could help. journalists do not ask "does american aggression bear responsibility for 'terrorism'?" karma!


#9

I saw that movie when it came out, because I KNEW Robert Redford was a good guy and has done some good work producing and directing movies:

Rebelião em Milagro (The Milagro Beanfield War)


#10

Just forget that Libya was not an Isis country until Clinton decided to kill Qaddafi to add to her resume that pleased the pro Israel pro war Neo cons in both parties. Qaddafi was an ally in the fight against the Jihadists. Connect the dots and put the blame where it belongs . On he foreign policy of the USA.


#11

yes, kathryn, it's difficult to understand how so many cannot feel empathy for people of another culture. i guess it stems from fear of "the other."--a form of dehumanizing the "enemy." like when lady macbeth said, "If Duncan hadn't reminded me of my father when I saw him sleeping, I would have killed him myself."

another example of american gullibility is how quickly the msm claims "isis took the credit," i always wonder just with whom from daesh our media or cia communicates. i don't remember where i read this, but had to copy the following quote. (my emphasis)

As of this writing, various news outlets—including the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post—are reporting that the Islamic State (ISIS), using official online channels, has claimed responsibility for the attack.