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Caribbean Looks to Paris Climate Summit for Its Very Survival


#1


#2

I think about the abominable history of the colonizing of the Caribbean region. The cheapened tourism kitch in comparison to lives of residents. Tourism - vacationing - which is an entire industry based on the "embarrassed millionaires" who are 'vacating' the realities of stress in lives of predatory capitalism.

There is a not-so-subtle appeal across the board in tourism for the 'exotic', truly an 'innocent slaver' - colonizer mindset, another way of dehumanizing both the traveler/vacationer in a vacuous voiding of reality. Cheap booze, 'gated community' resorts, gambling, where 'the locals' are virtually enslaved for the pleasure of ...

Can you imagine if this "industry" were to be harnessed for the benefit of actual well being? If the notion of 'eco-tourism' were to really come of age? Ecology is falsely separated from economics in tourism. What if legislation were passed that a percentage of each tourism ticket and some time of each visitor were to be dedicated to actual engagement with concerns of island residents - if vacuous tourism were harnessed for good?

Yes, I dream.


#3

I hope these concerned leaders do not suffer the same fate as Maldive Ex-President Mohamed Nasheed . Will they be considered terrorists as well ? Tho the Florida politicians are forbidden to talk about this , aren't they close to the Caribbean region ? Guess its time to look at my flat world map again .


#6

a possible solution is to only allow sailing or rowing as means of tourist transportation ?


#7

Adapt? Learn how to sneak past the Coast Guard migrant patrols?


#8

My advice to Caribbean leaders looking to the Paris talks or any climate talks for help is to start filling the sandbags, NOW.


#9

Agreed. The fossil fuel industry is not poised to stop and has many politicians in their pockets. The climate conferences are only a charade, a bit like our democracy, and as a hope, it is like trying to fly by grasping wind blown leaves and hoping to fly.


#11

Yes, I agree with you wholeheartedly. Mega-tourism, along with resource exploitation and imperialism, is greatly damaging the world and its indigenous peoples. It IS another form of colonization. My town was just named one of the ten best places to retire and I have also seen a big increase in tourism in the last three years. I moved here to get away from another town that has been overrun by traffic and tourism. The idea that people with free time have the right to go just about anywhere they want and expect excellent facilities and smiling people who welcome their money has always been odd to me and I can now see after many decades just how much damage it does, even so-called "eco-tourism". I have a photo on my computer. It shows a lone Emperor penguin standing to the left of the frame. In front of it are at least 30 "tourists" all pointing cameras and snapping away. I titled this photo the "New Antarctica".