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Celebrations as Baltimore Set to Become First Major American City to Outlaw Water Privatization


#1

Celebrations as Baltimore Set to Become First Major American City to Outlaw Water Privatization

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

Human rights advocates and union workers are celebrating as Baltimore is poised to become the first major American city to amend its charter to bar privatization of the public water system.


#2

Props to the organizers in Baltimore for pushing this city charter revision forward. This is great news but we all need to organize for much more comprehensive reform of ownership in the entire economy.

“Privatization” of basic resources is often not met with the broad, loud, public revulsion and resistance it deserves. We need a growing mass movement for comprehensive wealth reform, land reform, ownership reform, and democratization of wealth.

“Privatization” is the current term of obfuscation for the ongoing modern form of “colonization.” The legacy of colonialism – unjust, illegitimate theft and oppression on a mass scale, backed when needed by militarism and murder – remains woven into the fabric of the modern corporate capitalist economy, and must be seen, named, and rolled back. The entire structure of property and wealth that we inhabit is unjust and illegitimate.

A major city incorporating this rejection of water privatization is good news, but frankly represents the tiniest glimmer of the deep reform of property and wealth required for actual decolonization of the economy, and the realization of actual democracy, as well as an end to wars fought for the “right” to exploit natural resources.

Unless and until we accomplish comprehensive whole-system reform, victories such as this achievement in Baltimore will always remain threatened by the insatiable forces of greed and colonization and “privatization” embodied in the modern corporation.


#3

Does the tendency of revulsion to public ownership of water and utility companies stand in deep contrast to the belief that government should be run like a business? The real problem with voters ideas on public ownership is due to ignorance and the unwillingness to be educated. Many times I have independently tried to discuss public ownership of water companies with people and met with deafness and rolling of the eyes. Public interest and therefor public involvement in governance is dismal and the reason why we are in such a fix.

Therefore I believe that this statement is true and valuable “Baltimore will be a public water hero when this legislation passes—and should act as an example for other cities.” My reason is that Baltimore can be used for starting point for a discussion if and when a forum for discussion if available. And during that forum the reasons why it is unwise and unhealthy for the majority to have governments run as profit making businesses for the greedy corporations and the greedy politicians.

Voters do need to be educated that the country belongs to them but only if they are willing to participate.


#4

Kudos to B’more, my home town.


#5

Falling over asleep right now, but I think it will be a good
idea to send this article to our state legislatures, mayors and
town council and will look for it tomorrow – etal.


#6

web –

Thank you for repeating this – and notice it’s in quotes – but I didn’t find it in the article?

“Privatization” of basic resources is often not met with the broad, loud, public revulsion and resistance it deserves. We need a growing mass movement for comprehensive wealth reform, land reform, ownership reform, and democratization of wealth.

“Privatization” is the current term of obfuscation for the ongoing modern form of “colonization.” The legacy of colonialism – unjust, illegitimate theft and oppression on a mass scale, backed when needed by militarism and murder – remains woven into the fabric of the modern corporate capitalist economy, and must be seen, named, and rolled back. The entire structure of property and wealth that we inhabit is unjust and illegitimate.


#7

My quotes; the word privatization appears without quotes in the article, and the word colonization does not appear. The rest of the comment is my words.

i “quote” the words in order to try to call specific attention to the word privatization, and the fact that it might mean more than the limited concepts we are expected to entertain when the word appears in the media.


#8

web –

OK … then what I was originally going to say was that it is a brilliant insight by you –

I’ve saved it as I think it helps us move closer to truth.

“Privatization” is the current term of obfuscation for the ongoing modern form of “colonization.” The legacy of colonialism – unjust, illegitimate theft and oppression on a mass scale, backed when needed by militarism and murder – remains woven into the fabric of the modern corporate capitalist economy, and must be seen, named, and rolled back. The entire structure of property and wealth that we inhabit is unjust and illegitimate.


#9

Thanks so much Barbara. The more we see what actually is, the better our chances are to move in good directions. Blessings!


#10

And, I’m just about to use your quotes in sending this article onto my Westfield
Town Mayor and Town Council Members –

and later to the Governor and our town newspaper.

Keep on tellin’ it –