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Child-Killer Cop Gets Then Gives Up Second Chance His Victim Never Had


#1

Child-Killer Cop Gets Then Gives Up Second Chance His Victim Never Had

Having been declared grossly unfit in several earlier police jobs, the panicked cop who murdered Tamir Rice for being a 12-year-old black boy playing in a Cleveland park got hired Friday by a small-town Ohio police chief who felt he still deserved a 2nd/3rd/4th chance, being white and all. Today, after an outcry from residents who deemed the hire "a punch in the stomach," Tim Loehmann withdrew from his shiny new job, proving it's always worth it to make a stink.


#2

This nation’s effete “elite” claw their power from the legacy chains forged from the bludgeoning of society with puppets strung on forced impunity. Power in the US is pumping the opposite of anything sustainable, nurturing, balanced, equitable, educational, healthy - add anything of living integrity.
Parasitic models and institutional distortions are demonstrably killing the host on which they depend.

Tamir Rice was a child exercising the imagination of discovery essential to human life. He was murdered by a person who was assigned a power to kill by a system demonstrably incapable of preventing parasitic distortion and mental illness dependent on acquisition of that power through pathological lying.

This disease has an antidote of sustainable strength as demonstrated by the Tamir Rice Foundation and the courage, peaceful assertion of reality and dedication of uncounted human beings of health and integrity.

My deepest gratitude for the ongoing lessons and strength for all who can be touched and taught that love and beauty includes and calls for all of us.


#3

I’m suspicious of anybody who wants to be a cop, precisely because the job attracts, and frequently promotes, such people as Tim Loehmann


#4

It was murder and Loehman should be in a cage.


#5

You can thank the Police Benevolent Association and other police unions for these multiple chances at law enforcement. Records of misconduct in 23 states is confidential, has limited availability in 15 states, and are public in only 12. Moreover, 14 states recognize the Law Enforcement Bill of Rights and it is currently pending approval as a national law. It maintains that the due process we mere civilians are supposed to have is not enough for law enforcement:

  • If a department decides to pursue a complaint against an officer, the department must notify the officer and his union.
  • The officer must be informed of the complainants, and their testimony against him, before he is questioned.
  • During questioning, investigators may not harass, threaten, or promise rewards to the officer, as interrogators not infrequently do to civilian suspects.
  • Bathroom breaks are assured during questioning.
  • In Maryland, the officer may appeal his case to a “hearing board,” whose decision is binding, before a final decision has been made by his superiors about his discipline. The hearing board consists of three of the suspected offender’s fellow officers.
  • In some jurisdictions, the officer may not be disciplined if more than a certain number of days (often 100) have passed since his alleged misconduct, which limits the time for investigation.
  • Even if the officer is suspended, the department must continue to pay salary and benefits, as well as the cost of the officer’s attorney.

#6

the people who pay for them - the citizens - have no rights but they have a lot and when they screw up they seem to be held at lower standards than the rest of us. You would think they would have higher standards.


#7

My his evil act(s) haunt him all the rest of the days of his life until he comes to terms with the reality of what he did. But then, that would require a conscience - something so many police seem to be missing.


#8

Sam thing applies to anyone who wants to be a district attorney. After all, it is district attorneys who enable killer cops. Remember in the pats, lynchings were attended by district attorneys and judges. The retired district attorney in Portland Oregon once said he could get a grand jury to indite an orange for first degree murder but he never once indicted a cop for killing and unarmed black male. The violence begins at the top.


#9

The cop pulled the trigger and killed a man for no good reason. He should be in jail. Anyone else would be. The young man has lost all. The cop is still free to walk the earth. But still, this is a victory, however small, for what is right.


#10

It is not as if we have not been warned repeatedly for a few thousand years against power and the “people” it attracts
Plato may have been the first to get the ball rolling when he stated “Those who seek power are not worthy of that power”, but look up just about every great thinker throughout the ages and you will likely find a similar quote.
It should be widely understood by now that those who crave power are invariably unfit to wield it, but we still keep giving psychopaths taxes and titles.
We really do deserve our impending extinction.