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Children Caught In Sweep as Feds Kick Off Mass Deportations


#1

Children Caught In Sweep as Feds Kick Off Mass Deportations

Sarah Lazare, staff writer

The New Year was just hours old when the administration of President Barack Obama began rounding up and deporting at least 121 people, some reportedly as young as four years old, presumably back to the drug wars and violence they are fleeing in predominantly Central American countries.


#2

This deportation sweep is really f***ed up. I do not want to hear Obama lecture other countries on the plight of Syrian refugees. How can his admin not recognize that the people they deporting are refugees as well. And this certainly won't solve the problem...it will be getting worse as long as the US and others continue their current economic and drug policies.


#3

What are we talking about? One one thousandth of one percent? Why is this news?


#4

If the investor class were not draining billions of dollars out of these economies in order to line their own pockets and were the local Governments not made of individuals lining their own , there would be enough wealth in those economies to allow a viable livelihood.


#5

DHS/ICE talks like a fascist dictator- they were issued orders of removal etc as if this makes a morally bankrupt policy ok, as if now the children and families will not hurt- this is monstrous behavior- to be expected from a drone headed president, but no less horrible, orders or no orders.


#6

On the one hand, there is a push to allow Syrians to emigrate from Europe or Syria and on the other the powers-that-be are deporting purported undocumented emigres, mostly from Central American countries ravaged by drug cartels, internal strife, deplorable living conditions, and devoid of future possibilities for the people caught in the middle. I cannot imagine 15,000 people being uprooted, dehumanized, sent to detainment centers (women and children included), and then sent back to the hell they came from...no homes, no jobs, no life. Talk about a mindless, mean-spirited, number-crunching BS policy...and there have been more deportations with human families/lives disrupted and destroyed under the "leadership" of the former community organizer himself. Not a legacy to be proud of. American corporations have had a major role in the upheaval of rural economies with the likes of Monsanto coercing poblanos to plant corn (ethanol) or soybeans with promises of compensation and then pulling the rug out from under these farmers when it (Monsanto) does not like the figures on their balance sheets. People do not matter, only profits do.

How sad...very, very sad. The Statue of Liberty is weeping.


#8

So many of these people are Christians/Catholics, and the Christian churches, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, does nothing to protest. The bishops could stop this, but they don't dare oppose this bipartisan inquisition resulting in mass deportations.

They didn't oppose the war crimes of the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions either.

It is imperative to question what they mean by "pro-life"?


#9

And yet, people do not understand when I refer to this nation, no longer the Constitutional Republic of the United States of America, of which they were Citizens but instead to the Empire of the US Fourth Reich, of which they have become Subjects.
* Look at history! Look at what is going on around the world today. Endlessly expanding wars conducted by the most powerful Wehrmacht the world has ever seen. People killed in the thousands around the world, hundreds of thousands of refugees being created and the Reich has no place for them, as it continues to create more.
* Now, those that have escaped and reached this land are being mass deported, men, women, children, families, back into the cesspool that the Reich has created and from which they fled.
* The first thing to do is stop creating more refugees!
* This can be done by stopping the wars and reducing the Wehrmacht to a genuine defense force, closing the hundreds of bases that are occupying lands all over the world, and with the money saved there, begin rebuilding the world, helping the people of the world to recover. Help the refugees to begin to live again.
* The nation must be changed from a lawless Reich, back to the Constitutional Republic it used to be, but with even more checks and balances built into it, so wealth and power cannot again suborn and purchase the government.
* Then, if we are very careful to elect actual representatives of the people instead of Wall Street et al, perhaps we can assist in putting the world back together again, without bombs, bayonets and drones...
;-})


#13

At risk of being redundant I will re-post this - or if any missed this relevant Woodie Guthrie song also rendered beautifully by Joan Baez'
An LA Times story re the 1948 crash is linked at the bottom....

"Plane Wreck at Los Gatos"

The crops are all in and the peaches are rott'ning,
The oranges piled in their creosote dumps;
They're flying 'em back to the Mexican border
To pay all their money to wade back again

Goodbye to my Juan, goodbye, Rosalita,
Adios mis amigos, Jesus y Maria;
You won't have your names when you ride the big airplane,
All they will call you will be "deportees"

My father's own father, he waded that river,
They took all the money he made in his life;
My brothers and sisters come working the fruit trees,
And they rode the truck till they took down and died.

Some of us are illegal, and some are not wanted,
Our work contract's out and we have to move on;
Six hundred miles to that Mexican border,
They chase us like outlaws, like rustlers, like thieves.

We died in your hills, we died in your deserts,
We died in your valleys and died on your plains.
We died 'neath your trees and we died in your bushes,
Both sides of the river, we died just the same.

The sky plane caught fire over Los Gatos Canyon,
A fireball of lightning, and shook all our hills,
Who are all these friends, all scattered like dry leaves?
The radio says, "They are just deportees"

Is this the best way we can grow our big orchards?
Is this the best way we can grow our good fruit?
To fall like dry leaves to rot on my topsoil
And be called by no name except "deportees"?

Woodie Guthrie

http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-deportees-guthrie-20130710-dto-htmlstory.html


#15

This can never happen in a racially charged country. That is why the elites - the shadow government - chose and pushed Obama on the masses in the first place.

Everything in America has now become "racist". Obama still holds an approval rating of about roughly 45%. If he were white his approval rating would now be in the low thirties. He is also the master manipulator who knows how to fool the public consistently. He says one thing and does another but the media fools are still hanging on every word he utters. They are already speculating what he will say in his last "State of the Union" address. Then some will get tingles and goose bumps all over for a glorious speech.


#16

This is sickening, disheartening.

Tomorrow is Epiphany, the twelfth day of Christmas, the day the wise men came to Jesus. Next, warned in a dream, the three wise men didn't go home by way of Herod's palace so that they wouldn't have to testify about the baby Jesus's location. And then Joseph was warned to take Mary and Jesus away to Egypt so that Jesus wouldn't be killed by Herod's soldiers. Then Herod sent in his troops to murder every boy baby as a long-term preventative measure.

This nation ratified the 14th amendment to the Constitution so that we couldn't permanently label one set of people as slaves or throwaways and another set as citizens. Now we're sometimes watching Central American boys fleeing U.S.-sponsored death in their own villages, risking death in Mexico, winding up in our school systems, forgetting their childhood language and finally being deported back to death.


#17

Here recall our deceased friend, Comprehensive Immigration Reform.

Everything was in place for Comprehensive Immigration Reform to pass the US Senate in the summer of 2007, and Pres. Bush Jr was ready to sign it into law. The one decent act of 8 years of his presidency.

A month before its vote in the Senate, the rightwing noise machine got hold of it and blasted it. Limbaugh, Hannity, et al. It never had a chance, and it was a huge bipartisan defeat. Both of Iowa's senators, Grassley (R) and Harkin (D) voted against it.

Ironically, and hypocritically today, the biggest haters of Comprehensive Immigration Reform are Catholics: Steve King (R), John Boehner (R), Paul Ryan(R), along with Baptist Kevin McCarhty (R) and my congressman, Tea Partier Episcopalian Rod Blum (R).

Apparently I am the only one calling them out on their hypocrisy.

The whole anti-immigration effort appears to be bipartisan, as Steve King (R) makes outrageous nativist and hateful statements and raises a lot of money; and Democratic fundraisers cite these statements in their appeals and raise a lot of money.

There are some good statements in this thread. Best wishes. Si se suede!


#19

US Should Legalize Mexican and Central American Migrants Now!
By: Grahame Russell

Published 2 January 2016

It is important to understand why people are forced to flee Honduras, Guatemala and Mexico, year after year, decade after decade.

Legalize the 10 million, now. This is the only practical, fair and just solution to millions of Mexicans and Central Americans living and working in legal limbo in the United States.

As authorities prepare for ever more round-ups and deportations of “illegals” in early 2016, now is the time to continue pushing back across the country, demanding the government provide a legal path to permanent residency for millions of undocumented Mexicans and Central Americans living and working in the United States.

For practical purposes, this is necessary to enable people already living and working in the U.S. to begin to normalize their lives after being forced to flee their countries and then live in legal limbo and fear, even as they work hard just to get by, let alone support families back in their home countries.

Legalization will also provide increased tax revenues and decrease the unnecessary, wasteful burden on police and border security agents, attorney generals’ offices, and state and federal detention centers and jails.

But more than practical, this is the fair and just thing to do. The vast majority of the millions in the U.S., and the tens of thousands trying to cross Mexico into the U.S. now, are refugees in the clearest meaning of the word. Furthermore, the U.S. and Canada - both governments and private sectors - are contributing to and profiting from the very conditions that so many are forced to flee from, year after year, decade after decade.

It is time to put an end to the legal and political uncertainty of millions of families and it is long past time to put an end to the underlying causes of why they flee in the first place.

Underlying Causes

There are two dominant positions vis-à-vis the undocumented millions from Mexico and Central America, from “kick them all out, arm more border guards and build more jails and bigger walls,” to “treat them humanely, de-criminalize and provide due legal process.” As work and struggle continues to build on this latter position, we must keep in mind there are at least four significant and desperate phases of this forced migrant/refugee reality.

The phase that gets most of the (albeit narrowly focused) attention is the battle over what to do with people now in the U.S. As stated, the just, fair and practical position is to legalize them all, now.

Receiving less attention are the dangerous and deadly conditions people face when fleeing north across Mexico. Recently, there has been a small amount of reporting on the conditions of poverty and destitution, general and sexualized violence, drought and heat, and repression that people are victimized by as they cross Mexico into the U.S.

Receiving even less attention are the deadly situations refugees face when forcibly deported back to their home countries. There is documentation that many have being killed when deported back into the very situations they had desperately fled.

And then there are the two elephants in the room: the societal conditions in Honduras and Guatemala, and to varying degrees in Mexico – chronic exploitation and poverty, chronic violence and repression, weak democratic institutions, chronic impunity and corruption – that force tens of thousands to flee year after year, decade after decade; and the roles played by the governments of the U.S. and Canada, by the U.S. military and by North American corporations in helping cause and benefit from the unjust, violent conditions that force people to flee.

We are stuck in a mean-spirited, deadly cycle, wherein the U.S. (and to a lesser degree Canada) contribute to and benefit from the conditions that force so many to flee. Then, the refugees are criminalized, attacked and demonized if they can cross Mexico into the “safe haven” of the U.S.

Cold War Refugees

In the 1970s and 1980s, the U.S. received millions of refugees from Central America (Canada also received a significant number), even as the U.S. government was funding, training, and arming military regimes in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras that were carrying out systemic repression (including massacres, disappearance, torture, and, in Guatemala, genocide) against their own people; even as the U.S.-Contras paramilitary group was trying to overthrow the elected government of Nicaragua.

Central America was burning. Close to 500,000 civilians were killed or disappeared, millions displaced, many of whom fled to the U.S. and Canada - some as refugees, some as “illegals.” Over the years, many were able to legally normalize their situations.

Even as the U.S. and Canadian governments received a good number of people as legal refugees, there was no acknowledgement of how U.S. Cold War economic and military policies were – in partnership with military-backed oligarchies – the underlying cause of the repression, destruction and death, and the forced displacement of millions.

No Democracy To Return To

The 1990s were to usher in a “return to democracy.” This did not happen. Part of the charade is that there was no history of democracy to return to. Secondly, “the bad guys had won.” No one in the U.S. government had been held accountable for their role in decades of State repression and terrorism in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, let alone unleashing the Contras on the people of Nicaragua. Neither was anyone held accountable in El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.

With as little interest in democracy, human rights and the rule of law as they had exhibited during the previous decades, the Guatemalan, Salvadoran and Honduran governments – dominated by the same elites that had carried out decades of Cold War repression - spent the 1990s and early 2000s opening their countries to global corporations and investors, particularly in the areas of mining, African palm and sugarcane production, maquiladora sweatshops, tourism, and privatized hydroelectric dams.

Through the 2000s and currently, repression has spiked again, as police, soldiers and corporate private security guards regularly used violence (illegal evictions, burning villages to the ground, shootings, killings, rapes) against indigenous and non-indigenous communities on behalf of transnational corporations invested in the aforementioned industries.

By the late 2000s, any hope of respect for the “peace agreements” of the 1990s was gone. The majority populations in these three countries, particularly Honduras and Guatemala, were confronted with the fact that little had changed, that their governments and societies remained dominated by racist, repressive economic elites involved in repressive business activities, usually in partnership with the governments of the U.S. and Canada, the World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank, and North American companies.

When Honduras tried to implement minor reforms to address the chronic exploitation and poverty, landlessness, repression, corruption and impunity, the U.S. and Canadian governments back the June 2009 military coup that ousted the government of President Manuel Zelaya. The coup was carried out by the same elites the U.S. had supported during the years of Cold War repression.

War On Drugs

And just when it seemed things could not be worse, the U.S. “war on drugs” that had been devastating Mexico since 2006, resulting in the killing and disappearances of more than 100,000 people spilled into Central America, particularly Guatemala and Honduras (which, not coincidentally, are the strongest business and political partners of the U.S. and Canada).

By the late 2000s, Honduras and Guatemala had become major drug shipment places. Narco-trafficking cartels from South America and mainly from Mexico spread into Honduras and Guatemala and corrupted and infiltrated the executive and legislative branches of government, the judiciary, police and military.

Refugees Fleeing Abusive States

Today, Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador have the highest murder rates in the world; Honduras and Guatemala have the highest repression, impunity and corruption rates in the Americas. Mexico continues to be dominated by drug war repression and violence committed by the State and the drug cartels. Institutions of the State are corrupted by narco-trafficking money.

Central Americans and Mexicans are not fleeing “failed states.” They flee countries characterized by decades of violence and repression, impunity and corruption, exploitation and despair.

As U.S. authorities prepare for another year of roundups and deportations – amid shrill rhetoric about “what do to about the ‘illegals,’” we must push back and demand a legal path to permanent residency for all people in legal limbo in the U.S. now, and we must expose and change the historic and underlying causes of so much violence and death, desperation and flight.

Grahame Russell is a non-practicing Canadian lawyer, author, adjunct professor at the University of Northern British Columbia and, since 1995, director of Rights Action (info@rightsaction.org).

This content was originally published by teleSUR


#20

What you say is probably true, but we've got to keep fighting.
* You know, Hitler was almost stopped a couple of times, once by his own Wehrmacht high command. Even Hitler was prepared to stop his excursions to "reclaim" German lands, had the West stood up to him. They didn't. There was a plan to arrest Hitler during the Czech takeover as they didn't expect it to be approved and a war might be inevitable. They couldn't believe it when Chamberlain gave them Czechoslovakia, announcing "There will be peace in our time."
* They tore up the plan and the rest, as they say, is history.
;-})