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Citing 'Unprecedented' Power of Zuckerberg, Facebook Co-Founder Says: 'Time to Break It Up'

Citing 'Unprecedented' Power of Zuckerberg, Facebook Co-Founder Says: 'Time to Break It Up'

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes joined the growing group of tech experts, privacy advocates, and politicians publicly raising alarm about the "staggering" power of chief executive Mark Zuckerberg—and, in a lengthy New York Times op-ed published Thursday, called on the government to break up the social media behemoth.

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While waiting for the legislative process to grind its way to a resolution, we as individuals can vote with our eyeballs. BDS Facebook!

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After his stressed and lengthy appearance in testimony to Congress, Mark has been at great pains to please the PTB. I suggest that he is doing what centrists want now, and changing things may be difficult.

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Make of it what you will, but i believe he has now dropped these lawsuits:

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Mark grabs info from us and makes billions with it. Assange grabs info from the powerful and gives it to us for free. Look where one and the other are.

Splitting facebook up is not a bad idea, but it does not address our rotten system.

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Its not just the land assumptions that are neo-colonial - he is the juggernaut in neo-colonial distortion of the human mind accessing information. Insensate, tone deaf and insatiable - yup that sounds neo-colonial.

I opened a fb page when it first started up. It gave me the willies - I went back 2 times and then shut it down. Boycott

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Already sold out to homeland security

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right/ I’d be real surprised of HS and NSA weren’t DEEPLY embedded there

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Me too. But it took a long time till i was finally excluded.

The Raygun revolution accelerated the demise of New Deal era progressive politics that kept corporations under control. Three decades later 75% of US industries were on the fast track to monopoly and the Trump regime has exacerbated that problem.

In 2000 the too-big-to-fail (TBTF) banks controlled 10% of US bank assets. When they crashed the economy in 2008 they controlled 25%. When Trump was inaugurated they controlled 50% and are not slowing down on their march to monopoly.

The next time the TBTF banks crash the economy every other industry and all of us will be negatively impacted way beyond anything we saw shake out of 2008. If New Deal financial sector regulations are not restored (which would include breaking up the banks) it won’t matter what other industries including Facebook are broken up.

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Facebook does not need to be broken up. Facebook, and Google, and other network utilities, need to be taken into public ownership, and operated as public utilities, without profiteering and data-mining as their raison d’être.

Our personal and relational data and meta-data need to be constitutionally protected as ours, not available for corporate colonization and profiteering.

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this government does not regulate anything anymore. The giant polluters of the world as well as the giant secrecy/security systems are accountable to none. Even the FDA is hardly touched as there are not enough employees to inspect farming, restaurants and food factories

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“We are a nation with a tradition of reining in monopolies, no matter how well intentioned the leaders of these companies may be.”

That’s hard to believe. A bunch of greedheads deciding how to rip off the public.
What if all the people were equal shareholders in these monopolies? And turbocharge direct democracy.

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Breaking up Facebook along with all the Banks and other monopolies sounds like a great plan. How will we ever get politicians in power with the will to accomplish this? As it stands all the progressive folks are endlessly smeared by corporate media(MSM) and their lackeys in Congress. My fear is nothing will happen until after the BIG collapse, when everything tanks, when the current financial house of cards comes apart at the seams due to greed and hubris. I’m waiting…

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Hi webwak, yes, I do wonder what the 4th amendment is good for now, as so many companies seem to ignore that right to privacy and the right of people to be left alone. It really is odd that the spy people and all kinds of advertisers can track people everywhere, even when phones are off and TVs are not even on. Winston Smith had to go around the corner in his house so that the ever- spring camera would not track him all the time.

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oh geez, it’s the ever-SPYING camera. not 'spring."

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a fate i’m sure you’d support for every utility that’s been privatized.

we got a whole lot to take over.

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It’s not hard to defend the idea of facebook. or social media, for that matter.

the problem isn’t facebook’s size–it’s facebook’s activity. If there’s a principled opposition to gathering information from 3 billion users why should doing it from 30 million by any more acceptable?

Monopoly break ups haven’t empirically worked all that well, in case anyone hadn’t noticed. It dilutes the political power of a particular person or group of persons, but it does nothing to diminish the antisocial ideas the monopoly represented in the first place. Breaking up AT&T didn’t ultimately improve phone service or prices. At least not over what a public utility could deliver. Flight was way better when Pan Am and TWA ruled the skies almost alone in the US.

Zuckerberg’s personal power isn’t the problem. It’s the collective power of his class that is. And that doesn’t get solved with chopping FB into smaller segments that will eventually, like persistent amoeba, try to re-coalesce again down the road into a new, but similar, monster.

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Absolutely, and other sectors too. i thought briefly about expanding the scope of my comment, but didn’t want to dilute the specific point about the new network utilities.

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that’s what I’m here for! :slight_smile:

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