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Clinton Reminds Us That She's Part of the Problem

I wish the electorate could see the Hillary for what she is, as you do, raydelcamino.

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I agree with everything you say. The American People are the least informed on our history and what is going on. However, the corporate elites buying of Elections is Not Sustainable. America has nothing left to sell except weaponry and wars

You’re obviously working with Lrx to reinforce a narrative that turns Big Insurance into the HONEST broker when that is ANYTHING but the truth. Your Libertarian “conclusions” that spreading health care around would involve lots of other unpleasant (to workers) costs is standard industry pabulum.

Of course never mentioned are the kind of tax breaks given to all corporations… the ones that make the distinction between Medicare costing about 6% whereas Big Insurance takes 30% to run the same operations.

You leave out the clout of Big Pharma in demanding copyright extensions to drugs and then furthermore insisting that government not negotiate better prices for drugs purchased in large quantities.

Where Lrx tries to say “it’s those greedy doctors!” you’re adding another layer to a similar false argument.

Neither of you recognize that tax policy inside the U.S. is so skewed to favor the wealthy that any tweaking of said policy–in addition to removing subsidies for big corporations, and lessening the ridiculous waste on militarism, and adding minimum Wall St. stock transactions fees–could ALL finance Public Health where insurers got the boot! They are parasitical leashes and do NOTHING to facilitate health CARE.

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Then you are a fool! If all of Bernie’s followers are as narrow minded as you, then you might as well just hand the office to one of the Insane Clown Posse on the Teapublitard side. There is a lot more at stake here than just this one issue. The next President may have to fill 2 or 3 seats on the Supreme Court, for example, as well as other federal judgeships. There are many other issues here that aren’t mentioned also.

Because ending the Clinton “era” is the most important thing. Because it’s nobody’s “turn” to be President, and it wasn’t her “turn” to be President eight years ago, either. We don’t do “turns” in a democracy. I’m especially offended at entitled rich “public servants” who got that way by doing the bidding of their even richer patrons and try to win by bullying tactics and dirty tricks, stacking the deck with their people in the leadership of the party. The whole campaign is leaving a bitter taste in our mouths, and I think it will linger a long time.

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The same gravy train Obuma hopes to jump on.

Another to add to the very long list of things and reasons not to elect Clinton. Bernie is the only choice for the people.

As I’ve mentioned before on other articles related to Sanders, he is doing a poor job at explaining what he stands for. He gets a “D-” in my estimation. The issues he stands for, economically anyway, are win-win issues for the the American public, the economy, and the future, but all he does is sound like record in a scratch loop that keeps repeating the same thing over and over again. I don’t know who is advising him, or even if he has an advisor, but the more smooth and nimble (and completely corporate) Clinton is dancing circles around him, making him look like a befuddled crank. I hate to say that, but I was in DC years ago at a rally for single payer put together mostly by what was then the California Nurses Association (now National Nurses United), Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) and Labor Campaign for Single Payer, run by the great union organizer Mark Dudzic. In the context of a public, outdoor forum outside of the Senate Office where other speakers provided much information and nuance to single-payer, Sanders speech was great. But alone on the campaign trail, he seems unable to add anything to help potential voters understand single-payer, or the other issues he speaks about. He leaves himself too easily labelled a tax and spend radical, when his policies are actually better cost-wise for the economy. Clinton pounces on him and he does not rebutt with any punch, when in fact he should be throwing the punches and making her have to defend her policies. Last, as I said before after hearing him in Cleveland, what is he doing to engage those who come to his rallies to get involved in the many progressive organizations out there that have been battling these issues for years? Nothing. He should be plugging in those who attend, many of the youthful college age students who have dropped out of the system since they see it as rigged, and plugging them into the organizations that will help build the “revolution” he always mentions on the campaign stops. He cannot wait to do this. He must do it now since once he loses the nomination, which he will do, what will become of the disillusioned he has energized–they will become even more cynical.

As I’ve mentioned before on other articles related to Sanders, he is doing a poor job at explaining what he stands for. He gets a “D-” in my estimation. The issues he stands for, economically anyway, are win-win issues for the the American public, the economy, and the future, but all he does is sound like record in a scratch loop that keeps repeating the same thing over and over again. I don’t know who is advising him, or even if he has an advisor, but the more smooth and nimble (and completely corporate) Clinton is dancing circles around him, making him look like a befuddled crank. I hate to say that, but I was in DC years ago at a rally for single payer put together mostly by what was then the California Nurses Association (now National Nurses United), Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) and Labor Campaign for Single Payer, run by the great union organizer Mark Dudzic. In the context of a public, outdoor forum outside of the Senate Office where other speakers provided much information and nuance to single-payer, Sanders speech was great. But alone on the campaign trail, he seems unable to add anything to help potential voters understand single-payer, or the other issues he speaks about. He leaves himself too easily labelled a tax and spend radical, when his policies are actually better cost-wise for the economy. Clinton pounces on him and he does not rebutt with any punch, when in fact he should be throwing the punches and making her have to defend her policies. Last, as I said before after hearing him in Cleveland, what is he doing to engage those who come to his rallies to get involved in the many progressive organizations out there that have been battling these issues for years? Nothing. He should be plugging in those who attend, many of the youthful college age students who have dropped out of the system since they see it as rigged, and plugging them into the organizations that will help build the “revolution” he always mentions on the campaign stops. He cannot wait to do this. He must do it now since once he loses the nomination, which he will do, what will become of the disillusioned he has energized–they will become even more cynical.

He was unable. Simple as that.

The polls indicate that Hillary will lose to “The Donald” in the November 2016 election. On the other hand Bernie has a chance of winning against Trump. The voters rejected Hillary in favor of Obama in 2008. McCain and Sarah Palin also lost against Obama. Mainly because he offered “Hope & Change”. What does Hillary offer this time?

I will keep my eyes on the polls. If Bernie loses the nomination I may write him in. If the clown car is ahead, I will be faced with the decision of backing (ugh) Hillary like Bernie will, or living the rest of mylife under a fascist SCOTUS.

You are consistent, all right - consistently wrong …

As for me - haven’t changed …

This indirectly corroborates my post about the ineffectiveness of Sanders’ delivery of his platform. He should be all over Clinton and showing the electorate why he is right.

No. Paying for healthcare is the insurance companies’ product. Overhead is selling health insurance, processing claims and weeding out the fraudulent claims.
– Bernie Sanders and other Single Payer/Provider advocates say they can eliminate the overhead. Maybe*, note the asterisk. But it is well documented that Medicare and Medicaid have a lot of fraud. Expect the same from Single Payer.
– And worth reading Dr. Max Gammon’s study of the British National Health Service. He found that it progressively got more bloated with administrators, and came to resemble a black hole; the more money appropriated to it the worse the care and product became.

No, insurance policies are the insurance companies product - and they cut corners and spend as little as possible on them - paying out is overhead …

And there is no fraud in insurance companies? LOL!