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Coalition Marches on Washington to Demand Justice for People of Color


#1

Coalition Marches on Washington to Demand Justice for People of Color

protests in dc

Chanting "hey hey, ho ho, racist Trump has got to go!" protesters in D.C. condemn white supremacy and call for changes to the U.S. legal system


#2

I STAND WITH THOSE WHO KNEEL! Yes, this is all that needs to be said.


#3

Read the link highlighted in the article. Then remember William Faulkner’s words: “The past isn’t dead; it isn’t even past.”. They killed to protect their privilege. They will do it again. There must be no tolerance for white supremacists. Enough is enough!


#4

Well said Nighthawk. While we must accept the fact of white supremacists we must not tolerate it.


#5

Hitchcock vs Lone Wolf must be over-turned, it would remove the Plenary powers Congress has over native americans and set them free. There are none more discriminated against than the native americans. If this were to happen it would lay the foundation for all of those of color to be truly free. All of our shadows are the same color.


#6

The press presents the anthem/kneel protests as NFL/fans/players -
but it’s really about this liberal nation which wants justice for people of color
and who are sickened by our prison system, shooting of “blacks” in our streets,
lack of employment for AA’s males, and the continuing oppression of AA’s.

Oppression of women, of course, also continues on.

And if you spend any time on the internet, you will see what seems to be an
organized attempt at anti-Jewish propaganda, slurs demeaning AA’s, women –
and of course homosexuals.

We should also note that ALL of these oppressions have their origins within Christianity.

Organized patriarchal religions underpin Elite Patriarchy.

Christianity invented Capitalism when Feudalism was no longer sufficient to run the Papal States.


#7

We need to fully acknowledge the degree to which this culture and its institutions are immersed in racism.

https://utsa.influuent.utsystem.edu/en/publications/the-impact-of-light-skin-on-prison-time-for-black-female-offender


#8

Yes, I hope the teams in the NFL increasingly take on that challenge and stand with those that kneel. `I support those that kneel. I think that statement is needed when it has become obvious that Donald Trump, president of the United States, is a full blown racist. -


#9

Dit –

Thank you – had to look up Hitchcock vs Lone Wolf –

From their very weakness and helplessness. . . there arises the duty of protection, and with it the power

This assertion of paternal dominion over Native Americans reversed the Supreme Court’s acknowledgment of a certain measure of Indian autonomy in previous cases, such as Worcester v Georgia 31 U.S. (6 Pet.) 515 (1832). Shortly after the decision, the U.S. opened Kiowa lands to white settlers, and over 50,000 settled on the “surplus” lands that Kiowa and Comanche had possessed under the Medicine Lodge Treaty. The “plenary power” doctrine first affirmed in Lone Wolf v Hitchcock is still valid Indian policy today.
http://teachinghistory.org/history-content/ask-a-historian/24391

Only thing the US has ever done is attack the weak and helpless or to make vulnerable people weak and helpless!

And the only US use of power that I’ve seen has been not for good but for evil.

For a brief period, things were different - but as soon as possible the right wing used violence to regain ground.

Although officially repudiated in the judicial system since 1980 (United States v. Sioux Nation of Indians), the doctrine periodically has been resurrected in defense of denying Indian rights, such as in Indian religious freedom rights and those dealing with sacred sites. The Indian trust funds scandal at the end of the 1990s, involving Bureau of Indian Affairs mismanagement of Indian trust money, was also a long-postponed but direct outgrowth of the Lone Wolf decision and its attendant bureaucratic mind-set.
http://plainshumanities.unl.edu/encyclopedia/doc/egp.law.027


#10

Thank You so much for being interested, it means more to me than I can say and to cite what you’ve read to, wow…my Great Grandfather, Hampton L. Carson LLC, was the legal council for Lone Wolf Sr and Jr before the Supreme Court, this was his biggest loss and now my battle…people really don’t understand discrimination unless they understand this case, this is what it is legally to be sub-human…remember, all of our shadows are the same color and may you be forever young


#11

Ditton: Thank You so much for being interested, it means more to me than I can say and to cite what you’ve read to, wow…my Great Grandfather, Hampton L. Carson LLC, was the legal council for Lone Wolf Sr and Jr before the Supreme Court, this was his biggest loss and now my battle…people really don’t understand discrimination unless they understand this case, this is what it is legally to be sub-human…remember, all of our shadows are the same color and may you be forever young

It is always beneficial to understand and connect with the First People of this land.
It is still where much of the nation’s history is ready to be unraveled and freed from the
Elite propaganda and lies which made the continuing war on the Native American
credible to citizens who hadn’t directly witnessed that history.
It is the beginning in time and place of this nation’s grave misdeeds and violence
which sadly continue on and one – and from which I doubt we will ever recover.
My best wishes – and thank you.


#12

To the Choir:

Let’s not forget how the War on Drugs, and War on Terror both use people of color as fodder. (are we not now bombing people of color throughout the mid-east? and Afghanistan?)

  • 1 in 3- 4 Black males will spend time in prison. For white males, it is 1 in 23. Most will be imprisoned via basic drug possession laws

  • Unarmed black males are shot by police at a rate that is 19 times more than the rate of unarmed white males shot by cops.

  • Also at almost 19 times higher is the sentencing inequality that still exists between cocaine and crack. The original law was 100 times. In other words, if a white person was charged with possession of 1 g of coke, they would get sentenced on the Cocaine law. If you were an inner city AA and got caught with 1 g of crack, you got sentenced as if it were 100 grams of cocaine. But The Drug Policy Worked for years just to get it reduced to 18.1 with the Fair Sentencing Act times. Still a racist law, institutionalized. So much for fairness.

  • We have the highest prison rate in the world, with almost 25% of our total population in prison. Due to the racist War on Drugs, an inordinately high percentage are people of color, even though whites use illegal drugs at much the same rate.

  • A higher percentage of people of color is reflected in our military demographics. In general pop. AA is around 13%. In the military it is over 17%.

  • Due to the superhuman stereotypes of crazed meth and crack users as supermen who could not be stopped with a 32 caliber, the entire police forces of the South went from 32 cal to 38 cal. This is just one small example of the militarization of the police forces via WoD.

  • The 1033 program feeds free military gear to police, mainly to fight what? “Gangsters” who sell drugs and terrorists. See a theme, a pattern evolving here?

Looking at this graph, we can see the rate begin climbing precisely when 3 strikes and the coke laws were created. (around 1986)

And we know that through the 13th amendment, it is legal to have slave wages in prison for slave labor.

“Federal prisoners receive more generous wages (than state prisons) that range from $0.23 to $1.25 per hour, and are employed by Unicor, a wholly owned government corporation established by Congress in 1934. Its principal customer is the Department of Defense, from which Unicor derives approximately 53 percent of its sales.”

We talk about “feedback loops” with regard to the environment and global warming. Here is a feed back loop for ya’.

My rep, Mac Thornberry, receives the bulk of his donations from the defense industry. But he is not just a warhawk in step with djt, he is also an ardent drug prohibitionist, including cannabis and even medical cannabis. Why? Because current drug laws feed more people into prisons, so we can continue to grow the cancerous MIC, which feedbacks to the police forces (via 1033), who go out to find more prisoners, and people of color are easier targets, due to the level of institutionalized racism in the justice system.

Ending the drug war will create more trust between people and police, it will lessen drug abuse, save an untold number of people from prison, broken families, broken futures.

So one war feeds the other. We cannot stop the War on Terror until we end drug prohibition, the War on Drugs, and instead have regulation and legality. And now again to post this most infamous quote:

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”
—John Ehrlichman
https://harpers.org/archive/2016/04/legalize-it-all/