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Connecting Over Soil


#1

Connecting Over Soil

Helena Norberg-Hodge

It’s no secret that there’s a divide between the global North and South. Most people know about the huge wealth gap between the industrialized and so-called “developing” worlds, and that rates of pollution, resource use, greenhouse gas emissions – and much more – vary widely between them. But there’s another gap, one that’s rarely discussed in the media, or even by NGOs. It involves changing attitudes to farming, to the land and the soil – something worth considering in this UN-designated “International Year of Soils.’


#2

Working the soil to produce our foods is one the most wholesome acts we can perform in terms of realising our fundamental and essential connection to the rest of nature. And contrary to all the commercial and industrial policies that are promoted by the for-profit mentality, the only way to do it without unwanted consequences is small scale, local, manual and free of industrial chemicals.


#3

Thank you for your insight and perspective. We forget, all too often, that our reality is not the reality of the majority world.


#4

I'm putting in a backyard garden even if I am the only person working it/benefitting from it. We've lost our connection to Mother Earth in so many ways; here is one small step forward for our planet.


#6

From 1978 to just 5 years ago I lived a very rural life with my hands in the dirt all day long. Now due to poor health I have to live in Hell. Yes it's hard work, it ruined my spine but being in Hell is ruining my mind. I feel so disconnected watching people wander around with these phones all the time, the fancy cars, the fake smiles and "have a nice day"...geez, having a nice day was picking a bush bean from the bush for a snack while I weeded things away. Fresh healthy cow manure smells better than this "city" I'm in. Toes in the mud??? So much to miss but at least I got to live it for a while. If you're young, healthy and your BMI is right, get outta Dodge as fast as you can. You'll never regret it.


#7

After all....how could anyone not feel good about soils?;

Changes in Heart Rate Variability and Effects on POMS by Whether or Not Soil Observation Was Performed
http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=42273

Soil Cheers & Palpitations,
(some days however,... I must admit,... that all soil does for me is make my poms sweat)


#8

I have to agree with Helena. Plus, in retrospect, I've never felt more alive, more connected to my body/to living life fully than when I was an organic gardener for 19 years. It assisted in many ways all that I did in my family and in my outside the home experiences. There is so much richness in seeing the soil change over time to an improved, healthy state, and watching the abundance coming forth from that work. The flowers love a good rich soil, too. I had a circular garden that was amazing, filled with so many veggies and flowers. What joy it brought. Not only to me, but to my children and all that visited the garden. Wish that could be experienced by all. Not forced out of desperation but chosen out of the right thing to do thinking.


#9

Over years of gardening I have learned it is feeding the soil not the plants that brings me the bumper crops.