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'Creepy Violation of Constitutional Rights': TSA Uses Armed Undercover Air Marshals to Surveil Unsuspecting Travelers


#1

'Creepy Violation of Constitutional Rights': TSA Uses Armed Undercover Air Marshals to Surveil Unsuspecting Travelers

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

A domestic surveillance program called Quiet Skies—which is operated by the Transportation Security Administration, or TSA, and was revealed Saturday in a "blockbuster" Boston Globe exposé—is provoking strong criticism, with the ACLU asserting that "such surveillance not only makes no sense, it's a waste of taxpayer money and raises constitutional concerns."


#2

I honestly had no idea that this was not their stated purpose to begin with.
Aside from spying on citizens to ferret out “suspect behavior”, what other function was undercover air marshals supposed to serve?


#3

They were supposed to handle unruly passengers and stop in-flight terrorism, (not that we’ve had any).

The powers that be never stop ratcheting up the surveillance across the board, and wiping their ass with the constitution. Here’s another program we will lose more freedom with, this one will allow the cops to shut down the internet “in times of an emergency”.
https://theintercept.com/2018/07/29/firstnet-att-surveillance/


#4

What? You thought you had “rights”, wrong! All of that disappeared on 9-11. Get with the program.


#5

This is news? Armed TSA thugs have been riding planes since 9/11 and the “Patriot Act.” Are people so naive to think that they don’t check everybody out when they do that. That’s what cops do for chrissakes. To them, everybody is a potential enemy or “terrorist.” This is what a police state looks like folks. We’re not in Kansas any more (thank the goddesses on that one).

The good news is that these gun thugs haven’t taken down a plane yet or killed passengers in a shootout.


#6

Note to Air Marshals: There is a passenger on Air Force One who needs to be arrested and incarcerated. Easy to spot. Orange hair, stupid looking.


#7

You don’t even have to go to the airport. You could be put on a watchlist for reading or posting on Commondreams! You might be an “unruly” citizen.


#8

They may ask that all passengers and workers in the airport and on the plane do surveillance on a person, thru "emergency " phone messaging. It is indeed unsettling. They are not necessarily reserved. Phones have more features than taking videos, photos and recording.

The article suggests that the target may not have done anything wrong. Those on a list also may not have done anything wrong.


#9

What the cops have anymore is unlimited discretion, to which any trial judge will inevitably defer.

Actual reasons given for a traffic stop:
–vehicle was driving too fast
–vehicle was driving too slow
–vehicle was exactly matching the speed limit

Actual reasons given for an arrest:
–suspect appeared too nervous
–suspect appeared too calm
–suspect appeared too happy
–suspect appeared too serious

“Being the subject of baseless suspicion” isn’t mentioned in the Fourth Amendment, but here we are. Thanks, GWOT, and thanks to those who lacked the spine to resist.


#10

This is wierd. I don’t remember this being a part of the NSA,CIA, or FBI. Bush Jr would be proud though. I don’t think he would have imagined his little band of legal sex offenders would have grown like this. The real fun part of this is how the TSA will be our new KGB. Trump should be happy as a lark that we are so much like cold war Russia. Now Trump has a wonderful ice breaker for his favorite crush.


#11

If you believed that i have this shiny new bridge, etc.
On the subject of internet censorship Google, Facebook and Twitter have all joined the fascist bandwagon (not that they were ever actually off it).
https://www.wsws.org/en/topics/mediaCategory/google-censorship/#pk_campaign=sidebar&pk_kwd=imagelink-censorship


#12

I’m not sure what you think I believe, that I shouldn’t. I’m well aware that all of the internet co’s. are working against us. Hell AT&T has been on board since the 1990’s, according to employees who have left the company.
The link I provided is supposed to be a new program for first responders, if you haven’t read it yet, check it out.
I have never used FB or Twitter, but understand they can still vacuum up data.


#13

If that statement is true, that means all Americans that have flown, have been noted at one one time as suspicious.


#14

I ment that in a general sense. As in no one in their right mind should have taken it at face value that armed undercover agents watching you on a plane was not an imposition on your freedom, but were only there in case of an emergency.
Certainly did not mean to imply that you thought so.

Read the link you provided, and thank you for that. I added my own to show that corporations working with the government to attack internet freedom is a widespread and urgent threat.
If you have time you should read it. It is not about them collecting data (which is of course their whole business model) but actively censoring the internet.


#15

All true. But already electric signs coming into airports (and all over roadways) implore people to turn in others for “suspicious activity.” Also unending airport announcements talk about suspicious baggage, etc. It’s almost laughable, but nearly a whole generation has grown up amidst this crap and they have been “normalized” into the whole scheme, just as we were during the McCarthy Era. The only difference now, as you point out, is that technology is much more pervasive, invasive and ubiquitous. Long Live Big Brother!!!


#16

There’s no need to delude ourselves about Constitutional Rights. Those went out the window from the moment the Patriot Act and the NDAA were implemented. Our government is at war with its own people and this fascist shit is tough to fight. Hope alone won’t get us out of this if you know what I mean…


#17

Not long until “thoughtcrime” is officially listed as reason for being pulled off a flight (or prevented from getting on one) and taken away for interrogation?


#18

All countries do the TSA thing now.


#19

ACLU sez: “… such surveillance not only makes no sense, it’s a waste of taxpayer money…”

One person’s “waste of taxpayer money” is another person’s “return on investment”. From that perspective, the program makes total sense.

Double-plus bonus when those being surveilled are also paying for it.


#20

Another wonderful example of the United States’ “global leadership,” like Gitmo, the GWOT, and trillion dollar “defense” budgets. Leading the world into corporate feudalism.