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Critics Say France's Burkini Bans Employ Language of Human Rights to Limit Human Rights


#1

Critics Say France's Burkini Bans Employ Language of Human Rights to Limit Human Rights

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

The French government's so-called 'burkini ban' has come under fierce criticism after images surfaced this week of police in Nice surrounding and forcing a Muslim woman to remove some of her clothes.

A burkini, or burquini, is a full-body swimsuit "intended to accord with Islamic traditions of modest dress," as Wikipedia put it.


#3

I am as big of a supporter of secularism as it comes. However, this is an infringement on the freedom of expression. In true secular countries a woman should have the right to wear a burka or a bikini. We should not be policing how women dress in public.


#4

France does seem to be trying to outdo us the last few years. They were the lead bomber in the Libyan war and their right wing is even more xenophobic than our Republicans. Kinda disappointing.


#5

Does it really matter what style of clothing one wears to the beach? By the same token I rather doubt a French wonan would get very far dressed in just a Bikini in an Islamic country.

I was a child in the 50s and was brought up in a Christian environment, scarves were common attire for women in those days. On Sunday in church most women if not all, wore a hat, many with veils that covered the face.

Passage of these laws in France probably has more to do with stroking emotions for the purpose garnering votes for the legislators that enact them, than any rational reason for prohibiting them. That kind of behavior gave us a massive prison industrial complex, mandatory minimums, 3 strikes etc. Now most of us are shamed by the result.


#6

So no-one would get very far

So are we to compare modern Western countries with traditional societies or are you just trying to appear fairminded? Even wearing short shorts or a miniskirt in Papua New Guinea would get you in trouble.


#7

It could be dangerous to swim with a burkini. All the cloth could drag the woman down and drown her.


#8

I don't know what is modern about enforcing a dress code for the beach. It
seems like persecution to me.


#9

No; it would get you a 90% chance of being gang-raped. Simply being female in PNG is a difficult decision to take, but someone has to do it.


#10

AIn't it strange? 100 years ago any woman wearing a bikini on any European beach would have been called a slut and thoroughly discomfited socially; at that time near full coverage of the female body when bathing publicly was de rigeur, to be French about the matter.


#13

What if, like many people, she is sun-sensitive and must cover up on the beach? That happens all the time and isn't solved by an umbrella.

I've seen other pictures of this incident, and in some, the woman sitting to the reader's right in the picture seems to be scowling at her. I'm guessing she might be the one who called the police. I suppose there's no ban on witches at the beach . . .


#18

I see - so if a woman decided to dress modestly, it is because there must be a man, just out of sight, with a bludgeon, threatening to beat the woman if she dress that way?

Wouldn't a simpler explanation be that the woman for reason of her religion, or no reason at all, simply wants to dress modestly?

It is none of your fucking business as to how a woman wishes to dress! Take your racist intolerance and hate and go away.


#20

Iceland --
Strongly disagree --
The burka is a symbol of religious oppression of women.
Religious expression does not require that your religious symbols
(the burka) have to be on display in the public arena.

Also, I doubt you have any notion of the FEAR surrounding the burka
because as a male you have no FEAR of ever being forced to wear one.
In that regard, I also have to agree with government suggestions that such
garb can be used to hide ill intent/terrorism.

Obviously, there is no comfort for women in the wearing of these garments
which are intended to make them invisible in their societies. These
accessories -- reminiscent of fundamentalist Jewish sects which force women
to shave their heads and then to wear wigs or scarves -- are about putting the
symbols of religion on display.

We should consider this intervention by the French government actually as
a way to move these women into a free state of mind and body and out from
the religious mind control being exerted upon them.


#21

No I don't. I just view the irony of the whole situation.

And no, I am no idiot, but you are bloody rude and lack a sense of humour.


#22

Great post! Certainly gives a sense of perspective on the whole thing.


#23

But it would confuse the sharks and minimise the risk of being stung by jelly-fish. It would also lessen the risk of developing skin cancer from u/v light.


#24

So how does banning certain Islamic clothing in France improve the situation for women in Islamic countries?


#25

Good point. Maybe in 100 years the Middle East and Islam is gonna catch up and stop executing gay people and forcing women to wear burkas. I guess they'll get there eventually, hopefully a lot faster than that.


#26

I once saw a guy dressed as a hot dog on Coney Island beach. Talk about wild, phallic costuming in a public place.


#29

About right. When the Islamists started taking over...


#30

A strange comment but you probably don't understand life in PNG so let me explain. One of my enduring memories is of seeing a dead woman who had been raped the week before, lying in a ditch by the side of the main road about 11 miles out of Port Moresby where she had lain for a week, according to the policeman in the seat of the van next to me, and who had driven past every day of that week. He was there for security. He asked If I would like the driver to slow down so I could take a photograph. The woman had lain in the ditch for a week 200 yards from a local village and in clear view of everyone who had to use the road on foot or by vehicle. The policeman told me she had started to swell since he first saw her. I notified the local newspaper who published an article about her on the next day.The official police comment was that she had been dumped there the night before the article was published.

In PNG, one frequently reads of school-girls walking home from school being gang-raped. One statistic I recall, even after a good number of years, is that in three months an extremely large number, if I recall around 600, women had been gang-raped . That was in only one province in the PNG Highlands.Gang -rapes in PNG often involve 20 men and as often as not the woman is killed afterwards; a teacher from my son's school was ganged raped by around 20 men for 24 hours before being dropped off naked outside a police station in Port Moresby. She was lucky to be still alive.

Hence my comment. In PNG any woman who dresses in any way that may be deemed provocative or sexy is at serious risk, as are many women who dress very modestly.

That's just part of that real world in which I lived for many years.

I am not sure what a pro-choice heathen is; please explain.