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Crossing the Fossil Fuel Industry Could Now Get You Locked Up – For Decades


#1

Crossing the Fossil Fuel Industry Could Now Get You Locked Up – For Decades

Sabrina King

In the United States, people have the right to protest, and the press has the right to write about it. But over the past month, multiple journalists, documentary filmmakers, and activists have been arrested in three different states for engaging in and reporting on protests against fossil fuel infrastructure projects.


#2

Gee. Remember when blockading a nuclear power plant sent you to a huge warehouse for three days and they gave everyone as many winston cigarettes as anybody could possibly smoke.

In those days blockading Vandenberg airforce base to help indigenous pacific islanders and their deformed nuke test babies only got you three days in Terminal Island federal penitentiary.

Totalitarianism has blossomed and we're not even fully into regime changing Russia yet. Wait for inauguration day.


#3

There seems to be a limited number of individuals using the law to harass and intimidate, almost certainly at the behest of their lord and masters in the oil industry. I don't get why the Justice Dept hasn't stepped in...waiting for the behavior to become so egregious it's no longer politically safe to ignore it?


#4

With the mainstream media ignoring most of this activity, perhaps the DOJ has cover to say they didn't know about it ?


#6

They are taking protests at Vandenberg seriously these days. Ask me after Nov. 17 just how serious... this time.


#7

Yes, Obama, the great breakthrough. More like breakage. The lesser evil. The double down and keep on going evil. Nothing about this guy (buy?) has been good except for appearances. Fooled us again and again and again.


#8

Antics of the new ghetto police:

The fossil fuel industry is the war industry. What else do you fuel jets, helicopters, and tanks with?

The war industry is the fossil fuel industry. Who else bombs fuel-rich nations and sets up puppet governments?

Death begets death, to beget death,....

Chemical companies (including pharma), fuel companies, machine production, and banks = the war quadrangle; a vicious cycle of mass murder and ecological suicide.

Crimes against humanity? That, and crimes against reality.


#9

The prosecutors who are using criminal charges to intimidate are practising misfeasance. That is not their job. They are there to present the best case they can against an accused. It is u to the judge and jury to decide if their case proves the charges or not. Ramping up charges for political purposes is blatant obstruction of justice and corruption!


#10

What are you protesting at Vandenberg?


#11

'America the free!!!'

Maybe now you ar going to suffer what you have stood by and watched while the countries of others were destroyed.


#12

At this point, the equation is simple, if it benefits the Citizens it means money out of these Psychos' pockets, who happen to have the Power to see that That Doesn't Happen.

Chelsea, Snowden, Kiriakou, Amy, Dela....these are warnings to the rest of us to Stay the Hell Out of their Way.


#13

Very true, however, I think it's worth pointing out that we Citizens don't want to Regime Change Russia, the folks that Regime Changed US, in 1963, do.


#14

In today's Inverted Totalitarian Government, the term "Justice Department" has joined such inverted terms as "Patriot Act", "Clear Skies Initiative " and "No Child Left Behind", to mean just the opposite.


#15

Wow. That insight really clarified things for me.


#16

Well stated.

There has to be another way as well. It is difficult to see precisely a way forward, but it's going to involve a lot of informal passage of information. Charges were probably dropped against Goodman because she is relatively famous and might be a suitable trigger for a press-freedoms movement. Unfortunately, the other journalists involved are less recognizable, and their persecution does not seem to be sparking the same outrage. It seems likely that reporters will be held at least until the events that they would cover have terminated. It seems also clear that torture for at least some will be involved, since torture is done to intimidate, not to extract information. Here we might refer to the Chelsea Manning case.

Part of what is interesting here is that the peculiar sort of environment and persecution involved makes the position of a legitimate reporter very close to that of a whistleblower. The person who would pass on information has some initial advantage conferred by anonymity. That is, of course, what the NSA and confreres wish to eliminate by universal surveillance: with algorithms for metadata, persecution might be distributed effectively to not exactly silence dissent but distort it and distort its information.

Once information is disseminated successfully by that initial advantage--consider Manning again or Ed Snowden, though there are others--then the figure may or may not be sufficiently protected by fame to escape certain sorts of prosecution. So, for instance, Julian Assange has clearly been persecuted, but not to the full extent that the US government and particularly the bolus of mafiosi around the Bush-Obama-Clinton conglomerate would like to see. When Hillary Clinton asks why Assange cannot "just" be killed, she apparently receives a convincing answer involving a foreign embassy and publicity. However, the Clinton team has now threatened Ecuador at least enough to cut off Assange's Net connection. The thread here is really quite slender.


#17

War is peace, and so on............


#18

Obama's Dept of Justice has indeed stepped in on DAPL, along with the Depts of the Interior and the Army, and a direct response is due to more than 200,000 citizens who signed a petition at We the People. There's no call to be so disrespectful.


#19

I don't believe any of the "reporters" is "being held." Charged is not jailed, and since the inflated charges can't be proven (in fact would be disproved by the footage they shot), they will be dropped against the documentarians just (and as justly) as were the inflated charges against Goodman.


#20

I'm glad the ACLU is at least watching this. I hope they're busy defending, not only the reporters/documentarians who do have the power to rouse attention, but also those who are executing the actions.

Those who cut the chains and turned the valves on existing pipelines knew they were risking lengthy prison sentences. The Water Protectors at Standing Rock also know what they're risking by standing against the pipeline construction. Rather than railing against the arrest of Goodman and the documentarians, we should call on them and the ACLU to keep their lenses and microphones on the treatment of those who were arrested for their acts "crossing the fossil fuel industry" and rouse the public to rail on their behalf.