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Dealing with Emperor Trump: Field Notes from Ancient Rome


#1

Dealing with Emperor Trump: Field Notes from Ancient Rome

Kirk Freudenburg

The Roman poet, Virgil, wrote his classic epic, The Aeneid, in the aftermath of decades of political dysfunction and violence. Riots and bloody brawls, revenge killings, and periodic outbursts of civil war had turned Rome into a burnt out shell of its former self, as a rolling parade of demagogues, each posing as a uniquely gifted savior of a Rome that was once great, urged ‘real’ and ‘good’ Romans to hate and, when necessary, kill the ‘fake’ and ‘bad’ ones. And they did that, hating and killing their fellow Romans, in great numbers.


#2

Tell his lynch mob these things. Oh, right they aren't listening to us they're listening to the demons he's conjured up. If the last two weeks is any indication of what were up for the next four yrs. were going to need God or the Gods to help us because it's starting out ugly and I've got a really bad feeling it's only going to get worse.


#3

Change "chooses not to understand" to actively distorts.

Trump understands at least as well as anybody reading CD. He also knows that NEVER letting facts get in the way of a good story has been his key to being a successful entertainer and propagandist.


#4

I like to call him Imperator Caesar Trumpus Maximus.

The author makes an important point: Trump often speaks in hyperbole. His opponents should try to speak in real terms so that their arguments cannot be easily dismissed.


#5

" And yet ours is a grand, old, resilient democracy all the same. "

One that denied rights to Native people, African Americans, women, that sent Japanese-Americans to camps.


#6

Salve, Magister!


#7

I love it. " I am all men as I am no man, therefore I am a god.'


#8

I think it is also interesting and relevant that white men that didn't own property were also excluded from voting in most of the country before the Jackson administration.