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Decriminalization 'First and Urgent Step' to Fix Failed War on Drugs


#1

Decriminalization 'First and Urgent Step' to Fix Failed War on Drugs

Andrea Germanos, staff writer

A group of 22 experts on drug policy has added to the chorus denouncing the War on Drugs, calling for an evidence-based approach that decriminalizes minor drug offenses and supports human rights and public health.


#3

common sense rarely prevails, so it always takes me back for a minute when I actually witness such an event. twenty-two "experts," no less. does one dare hope this might actually gain some traction?
if they want to have a war on drugs, they should set their sights on the pharmaceutical industry. yeah, keep dreaming; I know--and I will.


#4

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#5

Yes, but 1st a mental health issue of a state that excludes not only significant segments of the population, but oppresses freedom of thought and expression through "educative" formation and the implementation of "security" measures such as the war on drugs.


#6

amen.


#7

The War on Drugs is not about life, liberty, nor the pursuit of happiness.


#8

The WOD is a war of oppression that criminalized one of the earths most beneficial plants to enhance police power, create "criminals", and provide corporate profits for certain industrial sectors, notably big-pharma, paper, cotton, oils, foods, and much more - a fraud from the very beginning!

The WOD has victimized millions to provide cops "perps" and reason to stop and frisk (mostly minority, young, and poor), search vehicles, build police personnel, funding and toys - not to mention billions in gov agency (CIA, etc) and cartel profits!
Some in law enforcement do work for truth & end the prohibition!. http://www.leap.cc/
http://www.drugsense.org/cms/wodclock How much money is wasted?

The WOD criminalized Industrial Hemp IH and cost our economy billions/trillions in lost manufacturing possibilities and jobs - while complicit sectors were given tax breaks and subsidies to make some very rich. Lets switch all those MICC war-toy jobs to cannabis/hemp jobs!!

The WOD intentionally keeps medicinal cannabis illegal or repressed nationally and in too many states - like NY! Cannabis is an effective, safe treatment for numerous conditions and diseases, unlike the expensive poison drugs pushed by Big-Pharma! Just google "cannabis safely effectively treats"!
Trillions for poison drugs and prison for cannabis continued by corrupt politicians like Andy Cuomo!! ENOUGH!

We have been oppressed, manipulated, denied our medicine, lied-to, imprisoned, homes and property confiscated, shot and killed, lives and families destroyed, and our republic reduced to a fascist police state intentionally using the BS WOD - especially on cannabis - as the vehicle for oppression!

SMASH THE WOD!

END THE PROHIBITION NOW! - HEMP FOR VICTORY!

http://www.hampapartiet.se/25.pdf - Highly recommended History of the Prohibition

https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/v5-284.html


#10

#11

In the 1970s I attended an international medical research conference in Sydney Australia. Peter Medawar, a Nobel laureate researcher there, said that opioids would be to contemporary western society what the introduction of European infectious diseases was to the Polynesians. Both the Polynesians and the American Indians had never experienced pneumococci ( that causes pneumonia) and streptococci (that causes strept throat) and thus were lethal before the development of antibiotics. Of course, our founding settlers also gave the Amerindians blankets used by people with small pox. That did not help matters, either. If I had my way, opioids would be sold in pharmacies without a prescription to adults and I would be very tough on adults caught transferring them to children. The enormous amount of money going into the prison industrial complex would be diverted to education and drug treatment facilities in every neighborhood, such that any addict who wanted to get that monkey off his or her back could get into therapy that day, not in six months when the window of desire for treatment closed. Money also needs to be spent on research to figure out why people seek drugs in the first place and to find better ways to treat addiction. Clearly, what we are doing is not working; it behooves us to try something else.


#13

Well said and thanks for all the links and info!


#14

The war on drugs: Is it a genuine public health crusade or an attempt to carry out what author Michelle Alexander characterizes as "the New Jim Crow"?

A new report by Dan Baum for Harper's Magazine suggests the latter. Specifically, Baum refers to a quote from John Ehrlichman, who served as domestic policy chief for President Richard Nixon when the administration declared its war on drugs in 1971. According to Baum, Ehrlichman said in 1994 that the drug war was a ploy to undermine Nixon's political opposition — meaning, black people and critics of the Vietnam War:

At the time, I was writing a book about the politics of drug prohibition. I started to ask Ehrlichman a series of earnest, wonky questions that he impatiently waved away. "You want to know what this was really all about?" he asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. "The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I'm saying? We knew we couldn't make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did."

http://www.vox.com/2016/3/22/11278760/war-on-drugs-racism-nixon


#15

I am sorry for your family's loss.

If decriminalized, would heroin users be able to freely use? Or would there be involuntary assignment to a detox/treatment center, if discovered? Just wondering.


#16

Your cousin's son probably had no idea how potent the heroin was that he was using. So, he wasn't able to measure his dosage correctly. That's why so many heroin addicts OD and have uncontrolled addictions. Its been proven the when heroin addicts can get regulated heroin in clean clinics, they can control their addictions and wean themselves off of it. But that can only happen in a legal, regulated market. I'm sorry for your loss.


#17

Drug prohibition has always been a proxy excuse to commence war on minority groups of people. The early propoganda used to support drug prohibition makes it abundantly clear. Plus they were already realizing alcohol prohibition was a failure and all those law enforcement officers were going to need a new boogey man to apprehend in order to continue having a job. I say the DEA should be reorganized to be an inspection and regulatory agency. Place them under the FDA and give them the job of regulating drugs, their identification, potency, and purity. Have them turn in their guns and flak jackets for chemistry sets.


#18