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Defenders of Open Internet Deliver 'Historic Win' as Senate Votes to Restore Net Neutrality


#1

Defenders of Open Internet Deliver 'Historic Win' as Senate Votes to Restore Net Neutrality

Jake Johnson, staff writer

The open internet scored a huge victory on Wednesday, but you wouldn't know it by watching America's major corporate television networks.

"Politicians see the light when they feel the heat! This victory was the result of the energy activists across the country brought. Let's keep it up and bring it home!"
—Rep. Keith Ellison


#2

Wow!!! clap clap clap


#3

Better get some penicillin for that!

(Hope we are still on the same team Apologies for the other day. I tend to hyperventilate through my brain.)


#4

Thank you to the people’s representatives who voted for this initial rebuke to the attempted censorship of free speech.


#5

Me too. I think from your posts that we are on the same team.


#6

Next it goes before the House? I’m not celebrating just yet. Anytime these buggers do something for citizens it makes me suspicious. Hopefully the continuance of net neutrality will come true.


#7

The chances that Trump will approve this are almost nil. I don’t get the celebrating.


#8

Score one for the slim glimmer of democracy by the Senate vote! Now’s time to pressure the House thuglicans that your vote still counts a little, well, just a sliver.


#9

No indeed not, Mr Trump seems loathe to veto any bill no matter how egregious and bad for his ‘loyal’ base may be.


#10

Me neither because unless they get a veto proof majority Trump will never sign it. I’m thinking that this is just one more “feel good” legislation that they can tell people that they tried, but they just didn’t have enough votes to make sure Trump signs it. I’d love to be proven wrong though.


#11

It’s still a long uphill battle. Getting Trump supporters to pressure him and the house thuglicans have to coincide.


#12

For anyone with a Republican representative in the House it is clear what to do. They aren’t all in safe districts and many are probably concerned about their employment prospects after November.


#13

For those interested: Republicans voting for the measure included Susan Collins of Maine, John Kennedy of Louisiana, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. Bloomberg


#14

I hope their constituents end up thanking them for this decision. As important as it is to criticize lawmakers for not serving the people’s wills it is also much appreciated to thank them when they do something right, especially as such actions seem to be getting more and more rare.


#15

Rhetorical question: V for Victory or Vengeance?
Rhetorical question: Heard any good self-driving car jokes lately?
Rhetoric conclusion: “I’m sorry Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.”
“I’m gonna get you for that, Dave.” Daisy Dayzee Givmeeyoransurdew…


#16

Rhetorical question: V for Victory or Vengeance?
“I’m gonna get you for that, Dave.” Daisy Dayzee Givmeeyoransurdew…
CNU Savannah this week working wonders.


#17

It has not always been thus. Read the Communications Act of 1934–seriously, the whole damn thing. If that’s too much for your 21st century brain, read the Wikipedia article, and compare it to the Telecommunications Act pf 1996 (signed into law by a president who was a member of the “Democratic” party but who had little truck with democracy).

Spoiler alert: Between 1934 and the present a silent coup has been unfolding in the American Republic in slow motion. The Telecom Act of 1996 was a major milestone, but it was an aspect of what Nixon’s soon-to-be Supreme Court “Justice” Lewis Powell urged to the US Chamber of Commerce (note the timing) in 1971, shortly before he took the oath of office. The coup, while silent (at least in the MSM), has not been bloodless even within the borders of this nation, but it has already resulted in far more deaths from other proximate causes, and millions of both types abroad. It continues today, despite the potential rescue of the internet.

If you have not already done so, read Yale Historian Timothy Snyder’s little book On Tyranny from last year, because it’s already here. Snyder offers 20 very brief “Lessons” on the nature of tyranny in the 20th century (his specialty) and on how to deal with it without becoming overwhelmed. It’s small, cheap ($8.99), and the author is not at all snide but eminently readable and deadly serious.


#18

This is what’s known as a “Pyrrhic victory”


#19

Something actually happened that went in favor of the American consumer! We should have an investigation. It must be a mistake!


#20

Many of these rump supporters are sadly misinformed and that can be played upon since their misinformation includes leading them to believe that the tech industry, aka Silicon Valley, is largely liberal. So, what to do? Inform them that the tech industry won’t let them see “conservative” websites on the internet if net-neutrality isn’t protected. They wouldn’t want that now would they?