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Democrats 'Fooling Themselves' to Think Wall Street Giveaway Will Bolster 2018 Chances, Progressives Warn


The youth vote and the Women’s vote are the last chance we have to save whatever is left of this being a democracy.


Don’t waste your time on democrats. Representative democracy simply doesn’t work. Reality is the proof, simply look at where the world’s representative democracies have governed to; the brink of extinction.


I’m right there with you. The Green party still appears to be the only way for a voter to vote with integrity AND speak against the duopoly. The seemingly intractable duopoly is one of the major obstacles that keeps us paralyzed. So to my calculation, either vote another dem - and maintain the current lethal status quo, or vote green and make the only sliver of difference that voting affords.

Also write letters, organize, attend events (we bring the kids, but only as long as there is hot cocoa available) etc.



Well said.


It was “progressives” here who argued that the Supreme Court was a bogus issue that the Democratic Party used against Trump. Now the same folks blame the Democrats for Supreme Court they didn’t care about.


I do not blame progressives for the election. I have said that often enough. Clinton lost it. However I do not forget the arguments that many made here, even if they do forget.


You mean you have been doing your Seth Rich investigation all by yourself?


The only problem with splitting the D voters is that half will vote for someone else and the other half will vote for the establishment democrat, the R will win by default since the D votes will be split between the D and in most cases a third party candidate. Bill Clinton won with less than 50% of the vote this way when Perot ran as an Independent–splitting the vote three ways. Our system is set up for two parties by design. Too bad they both suck.

1992 (below), had Perot pulled another 6 million votes from Clinton, Bush (the senior) would have been re-elected. There may come a time when one or either major party is overcome by a third party, but it will have to be a new one that enthuses the voters. The current ones are just not doing it. I don’t see this happening though for at least another couple of decades or in the case of a complete collapse Trump may fast forward us there. But think, w/Trump the stock market is at all-time highs, employment is higher than it’s been in 20 years, the wealthy have been gifted w/a whopping tax break and more.

Bill Clinton Democratic 44,909,889
George Bush Republican 39,104,545
Ross Perot Independent 19,742,267


So, Bernie did no wrong, it was all done to him. Got it.


So good to meet another Enlightened One.

Peace to you, Tshann.


I’ve been waiting for them to die of old age since 1980. Seriously, they won’t die! Most of it is the SAME PEOPLE.


I actually believed - and for a few months, that Bernie WAS a Manchurian candidate. I apologized for that man until there was no way possible to keep apologizing and I had to see what he was. I can’t believe there are people in the “draft Bernie” movement.


I was hyped on Bernie, but I also think he was and is a politician just like others. He made real mistakes and I find the unwillingness of some people to acknowledge this sort of amazing. He started late, his campaign was disorganized, and his ego turned a lot of people off, especially late in the election. The man ain’t sacrosanct.

I also find it amazing how progressives just seem to expect others to ignore that HRC got way more votes than him. She just beat him. It sucks, but it’s true.


He stood behind and backed Clinton as she was calling to attack Iran. He pushed the Russia hacked our election narrative on Democracy now for a year and said we needed to do something about it which came off as wanting to start WWIII. Oh he backed off for 4 weeks when he saw the unpopular position with the progressives and then went right back on it. He wouldn’t even return Stein’s call when she threw out a peace branch and said she would step aside and he could run on the Green ticket.

I really believe he would have been president had he taken Stein’s offer. I also believe he had no intention of being president but acted as a pied piper candidate to bring in the liberal base. He just told us what we wanted to hear too well in the Obama sociopath vein. What else do you call people who say the right things but don’t mean them but are still completely convincing? His no war stance went out the window with that Russia hacked our election mission he went on. I still thank him for waking me up completely to the Dems - and to people like him.


Living in red areas most of my life, which admittedly colors my thinking, I think a lot of angry white people liked Trump’s racial appeals, especially after having a black president. In that respect, I suspect Sanders would have had more difficulty than we think. It’s all counter-intuitive though and really, I know squat.


It is kinda like the party leadership is embracing the Republican’t mantra, “anything you say Sir.”. Oh, wait, it is precisely like that.


I thought Sanders ran a great campaign. I think the main reason he lost was he did so poorly with African Americans. I can’t explain why. Everyone knew he was a civil right activist in college and has certainly supported African American issues in Congress. Nobody knows for sure whether Sanders would have done better than Clinton in the general election. Progressives simply can’t move on. And I can’t explain that either. I would watch what is happening in the special election in Pennsylvania this evening. If Conor Lamb can wins this one it should get a lot of Democrats thinking about how to win elections.


Clinton chose Kaine and did not campaign in Wisconsin and some other rust belt states because she thought she would win easily. The lukewarm progressive stances she took after Sanders challenged her, such as opposition to the TPP and a $12 minimum wage, did not make her appear too progressive; in fact, many voters saw it as being very phony.


Indeed. Well. let me enlighten them: The purpose and function of the Democratic party (and the
Repubs if anybody’s interested) is to Preserve, Protect, Defend and Extend the power and prerogatives of Capital. Period. Now you know.


I too was bummed that Bernie ignored the green party’s offer. I was disappointed in Bernie for sure when he signed on with Clinton. But I came to different conclusions about him. I think he’s one of the best that we have now in congress - without a doubt. He has a good heart and the most courage of any of those bums. He’s also a bit of a curmudgeon too, but I think he’s the real deal.

I still respect Bernie, but can see that he has his limitations. Once he was out of the race, I was SO impressed with Jill Stein. I don’t have the same confidence that you do with who would have won if they’d worked together. I just thought if he’d have went in with the greens, maybe, just maybe it’d have opened up our country to the possibility of a third party.

Jill on her own just didn’t have a shot. She got some minor web coverage, but little else. As usual, the media sort of plays with the alternative candidates while lavishing the corporate candidates with coverage.

So yeah, is he a great guy that has integrity, courage, and bravery? Definitely in my book. When I look @ his actions, they are largely very positive. Sure, he’s done things I don’t like, and not been as strong a voice on everything. But on the whole, I respect/trust him … with reservation. Which is a great complement coming from me. I say that because for me these days, there are few I could say I trust/respect in government.

At this juncture in politics, Bernie is the best of what we’ve got in government. And he’s got the cajones to speak up - persistently & with clarity. And yes, for sure I don’t agree with all his actions - not at all. And yup, in my fantasy, he joins with the Greens and puts them on the map in a real way. But that’s not what happened. Bernie has his own vision. Now, I’m just glad we’ve got him on our side because ain’t really anyone else in congress consistently speaking up for the common good.