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Detroit Ready to Sue Banks, Private Companies for Unpaid Property Taxes


#1

Detroit Ready to Sue Banks, Private Companies for Unpaid Property Taxes

Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Detroit has finally set its sights on some of the real culprits of the city's financial crisis—the banks and for-profit companies that refuse to pay their share.

The city on Wednesday said it issued demand letters to 1,543 private entities, both residential and commercial, to recoup more than $12 million in unpaid property taxes, which piled up between 2010 and 2012 alone.


#2

I'm a bit stunned. I haven't heard this before. Too true that those who benefit from the american political/economic system should support it or give the land back to the Indians. The arrogance of the elites appalls me. They act so proud of the American Dream but also act like they are above reproach in regards to supporting the political/economic system that makes 'their' American Dream possible. Pay your freeking taxes you jackwipes!


#4

That's great, meanwhile the "centrism" and "pragmatism" that systematically allow hundreds of billions to be sheltered by a tiny percentage of the population in offshore money laundering operations, remains, and will remain, in tact.

I mean 12 Million USD is a lot of money not being paid to a city like Detroit that definitely needs it, but is just such a tiny drop in the bucket, relative to the big scam that has been going on now for decades.

That lovely neoliberal, and neoconservative economic game of cutting taxes at the top, redistributing income toward the top via programs for corporations paid for by the taxpayer including bailouts, US War Inc, emergence of the Security Industrial Complex, etc.

And the tide of this sick economic cult foisted on the world by these cultists continues to rise through privatization of schools, prisons, and soon a water utility near you.

This is called unassailable power at this point, and movements of the people will be crushed. We have entire cities in this country, where the one percenters play in their favorite restaurants, and the rest of the city is essentially locked down in poverty with the militarized police unwittingly servicing that powerful elite that keeps them busy cracking heads.

The screws are turned, and turned, and turned again.

Meanwhile, a kid sits on a bus in shock in Syria, and some kid is being enrolled into the school to prison pipeline.

Echoes of sappy NPR hosts, ignoring the horrors and injustice of it all, echo through this land.

I need to go out and scratch the dirt and peck some grains out of the dirt to cheer myself up.


#5

Here's my question, will it cost Detroit more then $12 million dollars to recoup the $12 million dollars that they are suing for?
If so then this is nothing more then a jobs program for lawyers.


#6

There damn well SHOULD be a tax on those bloodsuckers who attempt to profit on others' misery! Too bad in Detroit's case that the taxes involved are only on the property stolen, and not also on the act of stealing it. One of the best deals for a property owner in America is his/her taxes. Imagine what city services would cost if each person had to pay for his own street light, storm sewer, sidewalk, security patrol, school system, library, park, etc. Taxes don't cost us: they create SAVINGS!


#8

Maybe they are counting on Snyder to give them some relief like a smaller settlement....Just like Christie did for Trump.....Only the little people pay taxes...a quote from.(Leona Helmsley)..before she got busted for not paying taxes....Trump owed 25 mill Christy let him off with 5 mil......Republicans along with their rich sponsors dont hate taxes they just dont like to pay them....They rather we pay them after all they are the job creators eh....I herd that once.lol....Is it true?


#9

That's exactly the same point that I keep trying to remind people of in regards to things like single-payer health care. That is the benefits of having a healthy population out weighs the costs of social benefits. The return on the investment is the portion of the arguement that conservatives ignore when they choose to undermine and vote against providing social benefits. It is the return on the investment that proponents of social benefits must put to the forefront when arguing for government provision of social benefits. All to often both sides of the debate leave out the discussion of cost:benefit. For example: if we save $14 trillion by spending only $1 trillion, then every single dollar of that $1 trillion was worth spending because that's a whole extra $14 trillion that's going to be freed up for us to spend on other things like a new roof for the house. Right now, we are individually spending trillions when we could collectively manage those costs by investing much much less.


#10

They only want to create as few jobs as is absolutely necessary to run their businesses. They don't want to create enough jobs to make the job market favorable for job seekers. There's more than enough money out there for everyone to be well employed and well paid. Employers prefer to keep the unemployment rate high because that makes job seekers desperate for a job and so willing to work for lower wages under less favorable terms. Employers do not want to have to compete against each other to get employees hired up. That situation happened after the Bubonic Plague wiped out the populations in Europe. Suddenly, labor was in demand because all the previous labor died and so labor was able to demand higher wages and get it! The aristocracy didn't like that....