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Don’t Let the Trump Administration Corporatize Medicare


#1

Don’t Let the Trump Administration Corporatize Medicare

Diane Archer, Richard Eskow

The Trump administration is engaged in a massive deception about Medicare Advantage plans, those commercial insurance plans that contract with the government to offer Medicare benefits. These plans are offered as an alternative to traditional Medicare, the public plan administered by the government.


#2

Hopefully, the House will prevent even the possibility of such privatization for at least the next two years. However, the blue dogs are attuned to the corporate whistle, now, aren’t they. Vigilance, folks, vigilance. Always.


#3

No doubt, as the call for Medicare for All grows, so will the scams to trick and influence the population by the corporate health insurance and their bought congress critters. There is no limit to how low these vermin will sink to maintain their grip on the health care profits they feel they’re entitled to. We must remain vigilant to discredit their scams, and keep our eye on the goal to bring health care to everyone, and not settle for anything less.


#4

Thank goodness Nancy came along just in time to prevent those greedy selfish heartless Republicans from dismantling Medicare and Social Security.


#5

Is this headline a joke or just really really STOOPID?


#6

The scary thing is that there are a hell of a lot of seniors on “advantage” plans. The insurance companies bullshit them and they sign up in droves. I and my wife have TRADITIONAL Medicare with supplemental plans that cost us both $5,500 per year PLUS what they take out of S/S to cover what they charge monthly for the traditional plan I believe it’s $134.00 each per month. Now I believe there should be Medicare for all with NO deductibles or co-pays and cover dental, hearing etc. Remember the main difference between public & private is a very simple mathematical equation of:::: Basic cost of product PLUS the profit added equals total cost. It’s really easy to see why very popular social programs like Medicare, Post office and Social security are so fucking cost effective and work extremely well.


#7

It’s not just what’s left of the R/W “blue dogs”, it’s a hell of a lot of the “traditional” Dems that are into the “privatization” bullshit.


#8

Ok, so…usually I side with the Progressive agenda. But I have to weigh what I have experienced against what was said in this article.

I have been on a Medicare Advantage plan for 6 1/2 years now. It started out costing me $17 a month as a premium and slowly crept up to $47 per month. This year, I have the option of a $0 premium, so I signed up. My guaranteed out of pocket expense tops at $5600…but I also applied for “Extra Help,” since I live only on SS, and I applied for Financial Aid thru my health care system…which I receive. So, Extra Help pays for my Medicare, which is over $120 now–each month, and my meds. If I had a supplemental under regular Medicare, that would be an extra $200 or so, plus there is that donut hole issue with meds.

Granted, I’m not that sick. So far, knock on wood, I haven’t had a major problem. If I do, I’ll seek financial help to pay the $5600 and hope I come out relatively good.

As for doctors. My plan covers the doctor I chose anyway! Yay for me. And, the hospital that I must use, is basically the one everybody uses here. I think my care is good. I also get gift cards of $25 a pop for doing preventative care like mammogram, flu shot, yearly check-up, etc.

BTW…my neighbor, who was on Blue Cross, Blue Shield through a work related retirement plan, was paying over $600 a month for health care for her and her husband. When she heard of my plan she poo poo’d it at first, but then after analyzing where they go and what they pay, she switched to my plan. “$0” premium! She’s ecstatic! Her husband has lots of health issues but after talking to the insurance agent with her plan she realized the costs were covered as well as her BCBS plan! AND she saves the monthly premium.

So, in essence, I am saying BOTH plans could live side by side. For those who cannot afford regular Medicare (which actually is not cheap), the Advantage Plans could work. That way, the evil corporations could stay in health care and maybe not fight so hard to prevent Medicare for All. ???


#9

Blue dogs need to admit they are rethuglicans!


#10

Who’s paying your premium if you aren’t? Private insurance isn’t providing it for free so my guess is that it is being paid by our taxes. I know this was the case when I was on ACA before reaching 65. My premium was $17 per month. The government kicked in the other $696 per month. Being that I’m healthy, and hardly use the health care system, United Health Care ran away with over $7,000 per year with tax paid subsidies just from my account alone.

Private Ins and Medicare can not operate in the same arena. If we are to have universal health care, private insurance has to go.


#11

Alan,
As for who’s paying my premium. My ins. agent said that my plan had collected enough premium payments over the course of several years from all the subscribers, that it could offer the $0 premium plan to limited customers. Medicare pays for the “Extra Help” benefit. I’m sure Humana is making a huge profit though.

Universal health care with NO co-pays or premiums would be the miracle we all want. As it stands, I cannot actually afford regular Medicare at this point in my life–age 72.


#12

this post is totally wrong, and an example of letting political ideology overwhelm actual reality. I’ve been an enthusiastic member of Medicare Advantage plans for years and I’m very satisfied. It covers more than original medicare, (drugs for example) limits total possible costs, coordinates my care between primary care and specialists, emphasizes preventive medicine, healthy life style choices, and while it requires referrals from primary care providers to specialists, I believe in that too as that is essential to really control overall medical care costs. Yeah for medicare advantage plans!


#13

Premiums are an insurance concoction (and they pocket a good percentage to boot). That “$696 per month” the government “kicked in” to your insurance co was not just a gift it’s a bribe. A bribe by the Obama administration to get Big Insurance on board w/the Affordable Care Act (which is anything but). And yes, you are correct: “insurance has to go.”

Everyone needs health care, we don’t need insurance. Health care should be nonprofit and provided by the government through taxation. A small increase in the Medicare tax would cover it. Insurance’s first priority (by law) is to their shareholders, ie increasing stock value. This does nothing to set a child’s broken leg or a mum’s pacemaker implant, in fact, insurance makes all health care more costly.


#14

It’s true, seniors on Medicare Advantage plans usually prefer them. It’s easier to use and covers more. That said, however, the backroom dealings on these types of plans make them more expensive (to taxpayers) than just chucking seniors into (poverty and) regular 80/20 Medicare. There was some discussion by lawmakers a few years back to end all Medicare Advantage plans (over the cost to taxpayers) but seniors wouldn’t have any of it and of course lawmakers cowered.

Medicare Advantage plans force enrollees to gamble with their health and their savings” (and yet it beats the alternative)

I’m not saying Medicare Advantage should be done away with, it’s probably the best deal seniors w/out access to an extra $3,000-$5,000+/year for premiums, non-covered medical and/or GAP coverage will ever get. Medicare needs to be fixed.

In other words, Medicare Advantage plans cost seniors LESS out of pocket than anything else right now. Offer something better before tossing the only lifeboat seniors have in regard to medical care.


#15

Friends spent hours in the Medicare offices signing up for this shit. I was made to feel bad because I smelled a rat and would not sign us on.