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Don't Buy David Brock's Blame Game for Clinton Loss


#1

Don't Buy David Brock's Blame Game for Clinton Loss

Jeff Weaver

The knives are out on the Democratic side after the unexpected victory of Donald Trump. Not surprisingly, the first attacks have been launched by the experts on mudslinging against fellow Democrats: David Brock and those whose lease he holds like Peter Daou. Brock’s long history of character assassination and penchant for attacking those on the left continues.


#2

This article doesn't take a long winded reply. The Democratic Party, as a Party of the people, is dead. Why try revitalizing a dinosaur when we can renew ourselves with a new Party with fresh faces bringing forward a new understanding, skills and beliefs.


#3

Brock takes the art and science of blaming and punishing the victims while rewarding the perpetrators to a new height.


#4

After what he did to Anita Hill, is anyone surprised?


#6

Brock is a bug that should be squashed. He was behind numerous false accusations and tricks against Bernie Sanders and Jill Stein.

His methods are about negative campaigning which is more than likely not as effective as high priced political consultants claim. Brock pulled in half a million dollars this year to help lose the election for Clinton. He is a waste of money.


#7

For those of us who worked hard for Bernie and encountered Brock's CTR trolls everywhere across the Internet, we came to know that Brock is nothing more than a bully. He fed vicious anti-Bernie talking points to the trolls, which they regurgitated liked good little bots. I don't care what Brock has to say about anything or anyone. He's a lowlife scumbag.


#8

We can't possibly be surprised that establishment Dems are blaming Sanders - that's right out of their playbook. What is remarkable is their utter lack of attempts to understand what just happened to them and start adapting. It is almost as though they are committed to becoming irrelevant.

Hillary won more of the popular vote, maybe that's how they justify lack of introspection and continuing on a path that isn't working. But they should be more focused on the fact that Dems lost, and lost massively, when competing against one of the most obnoxious individuals on the planet.

The Dems are done. We need a new party. How we get from here to there is the issue. It won't be by sitting on our butts and complaining.


#10

Prior to November 8 the media couldn't stop telling us how fractured the GOP is. Post November 8 the GOP is anything but fractured while.the Democratic Party is as fractured as it has ever been.


#11

"Asking whether Sanders’ progressive message, and his authentic delivery of that message, is the path forward for the Democratic Party results in an answer that too many in the establishment cannot even begin to consider."

Same answer from all of them and if so,...your party is dead. Silly Hillary kept talking about bad trickle down economics while Obama kept pushing trade deals. So, thank you Ronald Reagan, Geo. H.W. Bush, Hillary and Bill Clinton, Geo. W. Bush, Barack Obama and all of your administrations for being good Neoliberals and opening the door to the Koch-funded fascists, who will be running our business/government (privatize everything) with the election of Donald Trump. The Neoliberal ideology of the EU opened the door for the rise of the right-wing groups all over Europe too. I know citizens will be fighting like hell to stop this takeover and I will be out in the street along with them.

The Corporate States of America


#12

"Now we’re witnessing the scapegoating of Sanders and his supporters" and those who decided not to sit on their hands and chose to vote Green. Be that as it may, it is past time to start coalition building with everyone willing to work together and, just in case it has gone unnoticed, the ecological crisis, the nuclear crisis will affect us all.


#13

"[A]nd millions funded his bid with over $230 million in contributions averaging less than $30 a piece.": This, probably more than anything, has scared the Wall Street Democrats and their cohorts on the Republican side.


#14

Who cares whether Ellison or Dean takes over the DNC, or someone else? Who cares who they blame? The Democratic Party is not dead, in the sense that it will run candidates in 2018 and 2020 (if the country survives that long).. It just has no chance of ever again being the party of the people, because it got married to Wall Street about fifteen years ago and this is a till-death-do-us-part marriage. They will not change, because their sugar daddies count for more than our votes. The people in power don't give a shit what we think; they don't even much care who we vote for. A new party is not the answer, either. This is a whole rigged SYSTEM, folks--a new party has just as much chance of winning as it is willing to compromise its ideals. We can still win and defeat fascism, perhaps even pull the planets out of the fire of climate change...but not in the voting booth. We can win in the streets, and we can win by withdrawing economically from the system. Get your money out of big banks, stop working for corporations, stop buying from corporations. Get your own independent solar panels or other power supply, see to it you control your water supply, grow some of your own food, or join a CSA, shop at farmers markets and mom & pop local businesses that are not chains, engage in barter.


#15

Perhaps with a founder that its rank and file can admire instead of Andrew Jackson.


#16

I don't think I've ever seen a campaign go so far out of its way to alienate potential support, especially by deciding--astonishingly--that bullying would be their most successful organizing tactic!

The only discussion worth having at this point for anyone determined to remain in electoral politics is whether or not this party can be taken over or if it requires a rank and file abandonment into a new form in order for ordinary people to be represented.

The Democrats have proved two things over the course of my lifetime. The first is that there is no better organization at co-opting popular passion than they are. The second, is that in this process of absorption, every good social impulse in America over the last 50 or so years has withered away after capture.

So which is easier? Trying to pry the wealthy masters fingers off the party's machinery? Or just leaving them to play alone and starting something new with entirely new leadership?

The record of people attempting to reform the Democratic party is dismal. Maybe try something different next time. Jump. Take a doggone leap. Sanders could have been that guy, but he doesn't have the imagination for the task. Find someone who does.

This ruling class of ours needs to go now.


#19

I’ve said it elsewhere and i’ll say it again. We don’t know who will lead (after all Bernie was an unlikely champion) but it is ESSENTIAL that the progressives maintain some momentum and move forward putting together a cohesive, highly visible opposition, with or without the Dem party. The party needs the progressives more than the progressives need the party. Soon enough Trump will make progressives of everyone.


#21

Thanks. The people of the United States need to turn their backs on this drowning Party and start fresh.


#22

While we must make sure that the Dems establishment don't resurrect themselves, we must also realize that the real devil which controls both parties is big money and more importantly, the dark government which has slimed it's way into real power beginning with WWII. Or situation, if we are to try to continue anything like democracy, is dire. I am now reading the book, "Mary's Mosaic" by Peter Janney, which is a must (along with "Devil's Chessboard", "Dark Money", "The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man" along with so many others). I believe though that "Mary's Mosiac" is the best attempt at allowing the average concerned citizen to begin to connect the dots of how the dark government has almost reached a point that it might be impossible to defeat. Read this book.


#23

And we'll call it the Labor Greens,


#24

You said it all in the last sentence. There is nothing to fear but fear itself.


#25

I think it's too early to say the Republicans won't fracture eventually; this is a honeymoon period for them but the fissures (on trade, tariffs) run deep.

I agree on the Democratic side; it must either move to the left under Bernie and become more progressive or we're facing a very long winter.