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"Don't Listen to Them": Insurance Industry Front Group to Run Ads Attacking Medicare for All During Democratic Debate

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/02/19/dont-listen-them-insurance-industry-front-group-run-ads-attacking-medicare-all

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What’s working for who, is the question.

My wife was advised by her doctor last year to go to the emergency room at the local hospital cause of some symptoms she was having.

After a slew of tests and 8 hours later, they released her cause nothing was found.

The insurance company was charged by the hospital over $10,000 of which my wife was told she was responsible for $2,600 which she paid.

Early this year, 9 months after she had paid the bill, the insurance company mailed her a bill for the difference of $7,400 claiming because she changed insurance companies she was responsible.

After she nearly had a heart attack, well actually a great deal of stress and anger at what she knew was basically a shakedown for more money, and a couple telephone calls to straighten things out, the insurance company admitted their error in billing her.

Nobody in this country needs insurance for their medical needs, we all need doctor-patient healthcare.

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Sanders will have to call out MSNBC and the other networks that broadcast the debates like he did CNN. It’s not like he has anything to lose as they are so biased against him anyway.

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Still waiting for someone to refute these points:

Switching to MFA merely changes who pays your medical bills. One has massive overhead, the other doesn’t. The former has ‘plans’, the other’s plan is this: You go to your doctor, settle on a treatment and then the provider submits a bill to ONE PLACE.

Private plans limit choice. If you seek help outside your network, you pay the cost. MFA allows you to pursue treatment anywhere you want.

Hundreds of thousands go bankrupt every year under private insurance. Nobody goes bankrupt under Bernie’s proposal. Countless more struggle to pay medical bills.

High deductibles with insurance companies discourage treatment for all but the more serious problems (nice way to raise a family).

No job lock with MFA.

With everyone under one roof, the government can negotiate the bloated prices big pharma currently charges for drugs.

In other words, why do we need insurance companies involved with healthcare? I’d hate to be forced to defend their side of the argument. I have no idea how I’d counter my listed points.

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There is no “doctor-patient” healthcare in America except for the very rich and the military that has Universal Health Care. Single payer has Medicare administration and some version of non-profit services.

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It’s a pretty easy concept to understand. You don’t get better healthcare, or lower cost from them. Insurance is an overweight middle man that provides no benefit.
If you know how to buy a stock you don’t need a broker, etc.

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That’s the reason we call it “The Protection Racket”: Pay us money and we won’t break your . . . bank.

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Insurance provides access for anyone that has medical needs that exceed their ability to pay. (with some exceptions) We have house insurance, and car insurance for the same reasons. Healthcare insurance is not regulated and directly responds to healthcare costs which are not regulated either. Medicare provides some regulation. One of the proposed changes is that some of these decisions would be made under a presidential appointed committee. How would you like Trump having direct access to your health care decisions?

There is a real difference in what insurance is suppose to do, and what it actually does.

You raise a good example fern. I wonder how we would act though if tomorrow our car, house, and life insurance all went up 30% due to administration costs.

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Well that is a good example too. I would start asking a lot of questions for one thing.

Using an example of infectious disease and illness that originate from being in a healthcare facility. This has been a big issue that probably no one ever heard about. There is the issue of who pays what. Medicare refused to pay for treatment of illness’ from nosocomial infections that are expensive to treat, insurance did. It forces healthcare to change their practices. Change protocols, more staff, better patient care. There are all sorts of these issues that most people haven’t a clue.

I have to go the merry-go-round ride at providers intake desk quite often.
I have VA, BC/BS, and Medicare one and two.
Providers hate me I think. They seldom know who to bill first second, etc.

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So does MFA - for MUCH cheaper and avoids all the misery Iisted in my earlier post - which I invite you to address.

Since we’d all be in this together, Trump tampering with our healthcare would be the easiest way to get rid of him - and doom his party. Just the same as the electorate will do once they find out he’s messing with SS.

Nice try with apples and oranges. Those are not critical needs. And they are much more competitive industries. For many reasons, healthcare is unique, not the least of which is that it requires large pools that include young people for it to work. It’s the reason why corporate folk don’t mind the public option. The government will be saddled with the riskiest sector - the poor. Not only that, providers will be encouraged to deny treatment to those on the government plan in an attempt to stanch and discredit any potential MFA in the future.

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Oh, you are lucky, you have a choice. Tri care use to be very good, not sure from what I hear now.

I think eventually one of them will have to be your primary provider.

“The Partnership for America’s Health Care Future”

Such a beautiful heathy supportive title.
A devil in disguise.

There are always downsides to any health program. But in general the benefits of an universal one payer health system far outweigh the ugly profit motive preying system in place now, for everyone.

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All mute points if we don’t have both the House AND Senate.

FYI My VA coverage is not through Tricare which is for retirees.
My disability is c&p, and there is no review. It is permanent.
That may have to be in writing with M4ALL so a president can’t mess with it.

'So does MFA - for MUCH cheaper and avoids all the misery Iisted in my earlier post - which I invite you to address."

Have any stats to back that up. It won’t be cheaper without cost controls. And yes, administrative cost would be less, over all costs? And probably not for at least 15 years.

“Since we’d all be in this together, Trump tampering with our healthcare would be the easiest way to get rid of him - and doom his party. Just the same as the electorate will do once they find out he’s messing with SS.”

I don’t think you understand what that means. Trump or any president could by executive appointment directly change your healthcare. It is more like privatization if you take a look at our current situation. No one can do that now and it is why Medicare still exists.

“Nice try with apples and oranges. Those are not critical needs. And they are much more competitive industries. For many reasons, healthcare is unique, not the least of which is that it requires large pools that include young people for it to work. It’s the reason why corporate folk don’t mind the public option. The government will be saddled with the riskiest sector - the poor. Not only that, providers will be encouraged to deny treatment to those on the government plan in an attempt to stanch and discredit any potential MFA in the future.”

Insurance is insurance and demonstrates that socialist policies can be corrupted the same as capitalistic policies are. Some might think having a place to live is a critical need as well but the finer point is there is a greater need for regulation because we are all at risk. MFA does have the ability to solve some of these issues if it isn’t corrupted in the process.
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Oh, exactly right. Military and some other types of care are not initially affected. At least in some bills.

I can appreciate your skepticism. The transition will be full of trip wires and negotiations as was/is Obamacare. It will be a topsy-turvy 5-10 years of dealing with cost sharing, insurance company employee retraining, and all of the intangibles that are dealt with daily.
My guess is that in the end we won’t be saving any money, but we will have M4ALL, whatever that turns out to be.

Thanks gandolf, I appreciate your concerns as well. This has great potential for good, I hope it goes that way.

That IS the plan put forth by Sanders and Jayapal.

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