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Downplaying Risks, Texas Sheriff Says Inhaling Chemical Plume Like 'Standing Over Campfire'


#1

Downplaying Risks, Texas Sheriff Says Inhaling Chemical Plume Like 'Standing Over Campfire'

Jake Johnson, staff writer

Following explosions Thursday morning at a Houston-area chemical plant, Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez persistently downplayed the severity of the situation during a press briefing, and likened inhaling the smoke leaking from the facility to "standing over a burning campfire."


#2

Every time one of these so called people give explanations like these, we must call them for what they truly are…evil.


#3

Ignorance and mediocrity are indeed evil in their deprivations.


#4

" Toxicity is a relative thing" Rennard said.

Maybe it is time for another book called: TOXIC, CHEMICAL, SLUDGE IS GOOD FOR YOU!


#5

These people that are downplaying the environmental, risks, need to be called what they really are: ENVIRONMENTAL TERRORISTS!


#6

Not “evil”, just capitalist.

The word “evil” is a problematic one - more associated with religion and superstition than hard-nosed scientific political-economic thinking. Marx analyzed and criticized capitalism endlessly. He described it, described the alienation and suffering of the great mass of working class humanity because of it, and proposed some revolutionary ways to end that suffering. But, he never used the word “evil”. I don’t any other luminary on the left - Rosa Luxemburg, Fidel, Che, Lumumba, Sankara, Debs, Red Emma, Big-Bill Haywood, Joe Hill…ever using the word "evil either.


#7

The most remarkable thing about these PR statements from this corporation is how, in the past, the corporate suits and their lawyers would at least give “we are taking this seriously and doing everything we can to prevent harm” lip service to the citizen’s concerns. Now, they are just bluntly saying “shut and go away - a little toxic vapor won’t hurt you”.

Capitalism is indeed reaching its “Atlas Shrugged” level of decadence…


#8

There is a simple solution to all this. Force these folks to live next door to all their chemical plants. And when there are leaks force them to be exposed to whatever chemicals are leaking for a good period of time. And finally force them to pay out of pocket for all damages done. And that goes double for all the government officials who run cover for these corporate a$$e$.


#9

What the hell, would a sheriff know?


#10

I imagine most of the readers here remember when Christie Whitman said the air in New York City was just fine to breathe after 911. Same shit, different decade.

Peace
Po


#11

But ‘evil’ is more readily understood by normal decent people.


#12

Sorry Sierra Club, there will be no change in the practices of the chemical industry. There’s no one on the side of the citizens, and our nation has gone completely around the bend. After a few more summers like this one, we’ll all be too busy looking for food to care about the air we breathe.


#13

As for “rebuilding” Houston, as someone mentioned in passing, time to, uh, pause. Floods are a given in Houston’s current location, not to mention ones of biblical proportion finding the area as attractive as a magnet.

Houstonians should be subsidized to move to a “New Houston” much further inland, paid for by the petroleum industry. As for the latter industry, the time for us all to start weening off it was yesterday.

Sorry, but courage for a major reality check is just what local conditions have called for repeatedly. Time to listen to the Great No.


#14

If you clicked the link in the article there is a CFO facility right in the middle of all that, but the Texas is pretty much a toxic mess.

https://iaspub.epa.gov/triexplorer/tri_factsheet.factsheet_forstate?pstate=TX&pYear=2015&pParent=NAT#pane-1


#15

He is just reading from the script that the PR folks at Arkema handed him. And the company headquarters are in Paris (Accord?), France. The chemicals they make are EXTREMELY TOXIC and LETHAL FOR ALL LIFE! It goes without saying that each and every one causes cancer. The list of their products appears on their website: http://www.arkema-americas.com/en/

There is no regulatory oversight and, in the rare event there is (usually after a disaster occurs) investigations of opns. and violations are found, they simply pay the fine(s) and continue BAU.

It is always about the money…


#16

That’s all good. But, you better explain to the populace what " time to move on and move away from the petrochemical production and products of fossil fuels, etc. " really entails. A comprehensive guide would be required. And, counselors for those who pass out from the shock and awe.:wink:
I’ve been in some of these S.Texas plants, too. I’ve worked developing and marketing products to replace even more hazardous and deadly previous generation materials.
The instructive picture we all should keep in mind here is the image of a normal human being arm wrestling an octopus, while under water.
This is a large part of the beating heart of the MIC, you understand?


#17

After the explosion, one Harris County deputy was taken to the hospital after inhaling fumes from the plant and nine others drove themselves to hospital as precaution, the Harris County Sheriff’s Office tweeted. The office later tweeted that company officials believed that the smoke inhaled by the 10 deputies near the plant was “a nontoxic irritant.”


#18

The plume of fumes from a flooded Texas chemical plant is “incredibly dangerous,” according to the head of the US Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).


#19

Anyway, standing right over a campfire would be deadly toxic. Numbskull sheriff.


#20

I wonder if the good Sheriff is warming his tiny hands by the “campfire”?