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Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Sentenced to Death


#1

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Sentenced to Death

Common Dreams staff

A federal jury sentenced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to death on Friday. The 21-year-old was convicted last month of 30 charges stemming from his role in the Boston Marathon bombing.


#2

So the kid gets to be a martyr. I hope it gratifies him. I know it'll gratify those who lust after his blood.

Ugh.


#3

Not to worry--given the interminable appeals process (google Mumia Abu Jamal for instance) Dzhokar will have three hots and a cot for a long, long time. Plus the appeals process will provide many income and publicity opportunities for the "legal team" of reptilian attorneys handling those appeals.
There will be books, a movie, maybe even a made for TV miniseries. Perhaps Fox or CNN will do an irregular miniseries "Countdown to Euthanize--Final Justice twisting in the Wind". We can only hope that the profits from such enterprises are required to go to a fund to give aid and comfort to the grieving, permanently maimed and wounded from the bombing.


#4

These reptiles, as you call them. are attempting to end all the things you listed that disgusts you. Those of us who live in states that haven't had a death penalty in over 5 decades find this verdict coarse and dehumanizing. It is archaic and caters to the worst aspects of our collective thinking about the inverted PIC & FCS ( Prison Industrial Complex & Federal Corrections System ). What a mess we continue to create in " one nation under god " . Since the 1950s this country has had a " mineshaft gap " when it comes to the world and the cracks continue to spread. Again, what a steaming p.o.s. we continue to dump in our only nest.


#6

you write: "...Those of us who live in states that haven't had a death penalty in over 5
decades find this verdict coarse and dehumanizing. It is archaic and
caters to the worst aspects of our collective thinking..."


It is federal law and if a jury in Mass (which does not execute anybody and thus matches your own state's approach) can sentence Dzhokar to death then they must have found his actions pretty coarse, dehumanizing, and archaic to do so.

As far as the motivation of the attorneys, they did their job (and will continue to do so through the appeals process) and deserve to recoup some of the considerable expense they incurred for doing so.

They gave Dzhokar the best defense possible under the circumstances and I am, sure they will continue to work every angle through appeals that they can to make sure that if he ever does actually die that it will only be after every possible effort was made to make it otherwise.


#10

There are currently 61 prisoners on federal death row, not counting DT. Since the federal death penalty was reinstated in 1988 there have been three executions, all in 2001-03. I think it's highly unlikely that DT will ever be executed, especially considering the troubled status of lethal injection as an execution method.


#11

Because, most likely, the truth will die with him.


#12

The Federal law overrules the state's rights of Massachusetts concerning the citizens wishes in this instance. It is called, among other things, abrogation. Here's something fiscal conservatives can chew on: it costs taxpayers about 33% more to execute someone like Tsarnaev than to incarcerate him until he's 70. Why are the Feds forcing Massachusetts taxpayers to pay for something they don't want when they'd rather invest in something like Pre-School for 20 poor kids? U.S. Atty Ortiz and " Sweet " Loretta Lynch know one thing for sure. Payday's on Friday and shxx rolls down hill. And, that's the natural sequence of events here, too.


#13

Can someone refresh my memory on this? Who was it that supplied the explosives to this bomber? Wasn't it agents at FBI? Wasn't it on the eve of Congress slashing FBI's terrorism budget?

Who trained him in the former Soviet Union? Wasn't it a CIA camp? Isn't his Uncle and another relative working for the CIA? (The uncle that condemned Tsarnaev publicly forgot to mention he was married to a high-level CIA operative who may have been involved in the rebel training?)

Since corporations are people, and there now is no difference between Wall Street and the government, can't we give these two federal agencies the death penalty and instead, just let locals under the 1776 system decide the trial and sentencing?

Since it doesn't represent our values at all, why don't we just get rid of this horrible oppressive Federal Government and transfer all power to the local level?


#15

The death penalty -- if applied justly and intelligently -- is an excellent way to get rid of people judged of no further value to society who have committed unpardonable acts. My main problem with the death penalty is that I've come to realize (finally) how screwed-up our justice system is, especially in regards to minorities (who in most jurisdictions have been funneled into the prison industrial system and are much more likely to get this sentence). So I'm much more weary of sentencing (especially death sentences) than I used to be.

In this young man's case, I don't think the system is treating him unfairly. He is someone we should get rid of.

I believe its Utah that is trying to bring back the firing squad? There is little reason that executing someone has to be more expensive than keeping them in jail until they are 70 (although I believe this statistic). Execution should save us money. Bullets are cheap.

-- Zagone


#18

The late lamented Stan Rogers, a Canadian singer/songwriter, wrote a song, Barratt's Privateers that has almost passed into the tradition already. It illuminates how a happy-go-lucky kid like Dzhokhar could get into a situation that costs him everything.

Oh, the year was 1778,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
A letter of marque come from the king,
To the scummiest vessel I'd ever seen,

Chorus:
God damn them all! I was told
we'd cruise the seas for American gold
We'd fire no guns, shed no tears
Now I'm a broken man on a Halifax pier
The last of Barrett's Privateers.

Oh, Elcid Barrett cried the town,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
For twenty brave men all fishermen who
Would make for him the Antelope's crew

ch.

The Antelope sloop was a sickening sight,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
She'd a list to the port and and her sails in rags
And the cook in scuppers with the staggers and the jags

ch.

On the King's birthday we put to sea,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
We were 91 days to Montego Bay
Pumping like madmen all the way

ch.

On the 96th day we sailed again,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
When a bloody great Yankee hove in sight
With our cracked four pounders we made to fight

ch.

The Yankee lay low down with gold,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
She was broad and fat and loose in stays
But to catch her took the Antelope two whole days

ch.

Then at length we stood two cables away,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
Our cracked four pounders made an awful din
But with one fat ball the Yank stove us in

ch.

The Antelope shook and pitched on her side,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
Barrett was smashed like a bowl of eggs
And the Main trunk carried off both me legs

ch.

So here I lay in my 23rd year,
(HOW I WISH I WAS IN SHERBROOKE NOW!)
It's been 6 years since we sailed away
And I just made Halifax yesterday

God damn them all! I was told
we'd cruise the seas for American gold
We'd fire no guns, shed no tears
Now I'm a broken man on a Halifax pier
The last of Barrett's Privateers


#21

".... a kangaroo court from beginning to end."

Without a doubt. Please read this article on the sentencing from World Socialist Website:
http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/05/16/tsar-m16.html
So many questions still unanswered, not even allowed to be addressed in this trial. It was
a travesty.


#22

By all accounts, yes. Up until then he was well liked by all, had a lot of attention from girls, and seemed to be a perfectly ordinary teenager. His brother radicalised him, but that kind of attitude change is normally shallow and mutable. It's just his bad luck that his brother, who pretty evidently saw him as a tool, didn't give him a chance to outgrow it.


#23

With a chance for a 'fair' trial, with an attorney that will accept and plead the accused claim of innocence.


#24

Thanks,

I'd forgotten about the actors and that this staged stunt resulted in the Boston-Lockdown.


#25

I have conflicting opinions about this case. On one hand Tsarnaev used a bomb to kill innocent people at the Boston Marathon (for God's sake) and he gravely injured many others. Some of the injured will be in wheelchairs for the rest of their lives. What he hoped to gain by this violent act seems to be insane in the extreme. He gained nothing. To keep him alive would cost American tax payers $50~70,000 a year. That could amount to 2 million dollars to keep this scumbag alive. Tsarnaev should never step foot in society again and should never be heard of again.
If ever a person deserved to be put to death, Dzhokkhar Tsarnaev is one such person. He is a baby faced monster. Prison for life or death penalty - I make no choice. Usually I am against the death penalty but this is a case of a mass murdering terrorist during a sporting event.


#27

What the hell are you talking about. He used a bomb to kill and terrorize people at the Boston Marathon. He was captured on film with his brother. He was in a shoot out trying to escape. Kangaroo court? Where?
Tsarnaev is a baby faced mass murdering terrorist. Shame on you.


#28

He is not a kid. Tsarnaev is a baby faced, mass murdering terrorists. No one is lusting after his blood. He was lusting after the blood of innocent Boston Marathon participants who are now dead or gravely injured - some in wheelchairs for the rest of their lives. How would you like to go from being an athletic, outdoors person to being parallelized in a wheelchair for the rest of your life. I have compassion for the victims. I think that Tsarnaev wishes this never happened - I know his victims do.


#30

Do you? Or do you just have to have a persuasive big brother? Or a uniform? Is there much difference between personally placing a nail bomb and firing a missile from a drone? We accept the latter without much protest. How do we manage to see one as utterly depraved criminality and the other as something ethically more akin to killing someone while driving drunk?


#31

He was a kid at the time, and he's not really much more today. US culture infantalises teenagers.

If you read about how people saw his personality before the event, he was very normal, outgoing, friendly, everything. He wasn't a psychopath slinking around setting fires and torturing small non-humans, he was just a normal kid as far as anyone could tell. Something happened. I think that something was his brother.